Easy Homemade Mayonnaise

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Nancree, Jan 27, 2005.

  1. Nancree

    Nancree Guest

    I've posted this before, but this method is so simple compared to others that
    I've seen on RFC, I thought I'd post it again. I haven't bought mayo in years.
    An immersible stick blender (Braun) makes it simple.

    In a glass jar (I use a peanut butter jar) put, in this order:

    one room-temperature egg ( I put mind in a cup of warm water while I gather
    other ingredients)
    1 scant teaspoon of *fresh* lime juice
    1 scant teaspoon of dry mustard
    3/4 teaspoon salt
    1 scant cup canola oil
    *Without* turning it on, put stick blender all the way to the bottom of the
    jar. Then turn it on, rock is from side to side as you pull it to the top. You
    will have instant, delicious mayonnaise.
    You can also do this in a food processor but you will probably have more
    failures. (add the oil slowly as you blend). For me, it is so worth it to buy
    a stick blender (Braun brand is best).
    Refrigerate, of course, and it keeps for several days.
    Enjoy!
     
    Tags:


  2. notbob

    notbob Guest

    On 2005-01-28, Nancree <[email protected]> wrote:

    > one room-temperature egg ( I put mind in a cup of warm water while I gather
    > other ingredients)
    > 1 scant teaspoon of *fresh* lime juice
    > 1 scant teaspoon of dry mustard
    > 3/4 teaspoon salt
    > 1 scant cup canola oil


    I'll give it a try, Nan, but what's with all the "scants"? Scan't I just
    use regular measures? ;)

    nb
     
  3. Damsel

    Damsel Guest

    On Fri, 28 Jan 2005 01:36:57 -0600, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 2005-01-28, Nancree <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> one room-temperature egg ( I put mind in a cup of warm water while I gather
    >> other ingredients)
    >> 1 scant teaspoon of *fresh* lime juice
    >> 1 scant teaspoon of dry mustard
    >> 3/4 teaspoon salt
    >> 1 scant cup canola oil

    >
    >I'll give it a try, Nan, but what's with all the "scants"? Scan't I just
    >use regular measures? ;)


    A scant teaspoon of dry mustard means you don't mound the mustard in the
    measuring spoon. A scant teaspoon of lime juice means ..... wait, that's
    not right. Hmmm. At least the recipe doesn't call for a scant egg. ;)

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  4. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Nancree" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I've posted this before, but this method is so simple compared to others
    > that
    > I've seen on RFC, I thought I'd post it again. I haven't bought mayo in
    > years.
    > An immersible stick blender (Braun) makes it simple.
    >
    > In a glass jar (I use a peanut butter jar) put, in this order:
    >
    > one room-temperature egg ( I put mind in a cup of warm water while I
    > gather
    > other ingredients)
    > 1 scant teaspoon of *fresh* lime juice
    > 1 scant teaspoon of dry mustard
    > 3/4 teaspoon salt
    > 1 scant cup canola oil
    > *Without* turning it on, put stick blender all the way to the bottom of
    > the
    > jar. Then turn it on, rock is from side to side as you pull it to the top.
    > You
    > will have instant, delicious mayonnaise.
    > You can also do this in a food processor but you will probably have more
    > failures. (add the oil slowly as you blend). For me, it is so worth it to
    > buy
    > a stick blender (Braun brand is best).
    > Refrigerate, of course, and it keeps for several days.
    > Enjoy!


    Thanks for your mayo recipe. Eating an egg which is remotely uncooked
    makes my stomach unsettled just to think about it. I've always wanted to
    make my own mayo because it seems so simple to make. Has anyone used the
    "pasteurized eggs" to make mayonnaise. I've not even seen in in grocery
    stores, but on the food channels they talk about it as it is a common item.
    Thanks.
    Dee
     
  5. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Dee wrote:

    > Has anyone used the "pasteurized eggs" to make mayonnaise. I've not
    > even seen in in grocery stores, but on the food channels they talk
    > about it as it is a common item.


    Yes, and it was FANTASTIC! Unfortunately, my grocery store stopped carrying
    pasteurized eggs back in September or October last year, so I haven't made
    mayonnaise since. Didn't make eggnog over the holidays, either. :-(

    I filled out one of those supermarket survey forms where you list items you
    WISH the store carried, and actually got a phone call from a regional
    representative for Safeway. In our conversation, she claimed that the store
    would start carrying the eggs again, but they never did. They've never been
    carried by any other stores in the area.

    Bob
     
  6. On Fri 28 Jan 2005 12:36:57a, notbob wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > On 2005-01-28, Nancree <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> one room-temperature egg ( I put mind in a cup of warm water while I
    >> gather other ingredients)
    >> 1 scant teaspoon of *fresh* lime juice
    >> 1 scant teaspoon of dry mustard
    >> 3/4 teaspoon salt
    >> 1 scant cup canola oil

    >
    > I'll give it a try, Nan, but what's with all the "scants"? Scan't I
    > just use regular measures? ;)
    >
    > nb


    Yeah, scants and I don't get along. I mean, what exactly constitutes a
    "scant" of anything? How much do ou leave out? :) Someone should
    manufacturer an additional set of measuring spoons and cups that are "scant",
    so there's no mistaking how much is needed.

    Wayne
     
  7. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Bob" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Dee wrote:
    >
    >> Has anyone used the "pasteurized eggs" to make mayonnaise. I've not
    >> even seen in in grocery stores, but on the food channels they talk
    >> about it as it is a common item.

    >
    > Yes, and it was FANTASTIC! Unfortunately, my grocery store stopped
    > carrying pasteurized eggs back in September or October last year, so I
    > haven't made mayonnaise since. Didn't make eggnog over the holidays,
    > either. :-(
    >
    > I filled out one of those supermarket survey forms where you list items
    > you WISH the store carried, and actually got a phone call from a regional
    > representative for Safeway. In our conversation, she claimed that the
    > store would start carrying the eggs again, but they never did. They've
    > never been carried by any other stores in the area.
    >
    > Bob


    I'm so sorry when this happens. Since you gave pasteurized eggs a good
    recommendation, I will have to ask Martin's (which is a subsidiary, I think)
    of the big Giants supermarket. I asked them to please put King Arthur flour
    back on the shelves, and they did!!! When I see the manager bagging
    groceries, I always thank him.

    Still, pasteurized eggs! After they are pasteurized, they are still runny,
    right? And they look just like a raw egg, right? I only tried the whites in
    a container once and I barely made it to the bathroom.

    To me, its like eating anchovies. I love the idea of it, will buy salted
    ones and leave them in the refr. I will buy sardines and then throw them
    out -- I don't know why I can't get past this.
    Dee
     
  8. On Fri 28 Jan 2005 06:50:38a, Dee Randall wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    >
    > "Bob" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Dee wrote:
    >>
    >>> Has anyone used the "pasteurized eggs" to make mayonnaise. I've not
    >>> even seen in in grocery stores, but on the food channels they talk
    >>> about it as it is a common item.

    >>
    >> Yes, and it was FANTASTIC! Unfortunately, my grocery store stopped
    >> carrying pasteurized eggs back in September or October last year, so I
    >> haven't made mayonnaise since. Didn't make eggnog over the holidays,
    >> either. :-(
    >>
    >> I filled out one of those supermarket survey forms where you list items
    >> you WISH the store carried, and actually got a phone call from a
    >> regional representative for Safeway. In our conversation, she claimed
    >> that the store would start carrying the eggs again, but they never did.
    >> They've never been carried by any other stores in the area.
    >>
    >> Bob

    >
    > I'm so sorry when this happens. Since you gave pasteurized eggs a good
    > recommendation, I will have to ask Martin's (which is a subsidiary, I
    > think) of the big Giants supermarket. I asked them to please put King
    > Arthur flour back on the shelves, and they did!!! When I see the manager
    > bagging groceries, I always thank him.
    >
    > Still, pasteurized eggs! After they are pasteurized, they are still
    > runny, right? And they look just like a raw egg, right? I only tried
    > the whites in a container once and I barely made it to the bathroom.
    >
    > To me, its like eating anchovies. I love the idea of it, will buy
    > salted ones and leave them in the refr. I will buy sardines and then
    > throw them out -- I don't know why I can't get past this.
    > Dee


    I understand that. Maybe it's the setting... When I was a kid I had a
    favorite aunt who had four children, and she and my uncle both worked full
    time. She had little spare time for me, but every so often she would set
    aside some "special" time for me, gather up some special foods, and we'd
    drive to the park or to the beach and sit and talk and eat. She would
    often buy a can of smoked clams or smoked oysters and I, the 11 y.o.,
    thought it was so exotic and scarfed them down along with good crakers and
    cheeses. Nowadays, if I occasional buy a can, most of them get tossed out.

    Wayne
     
  9. Steve Calvin

    Steve Calvin Guest

    Nancree wrote:

    > *Without* turning it on, put stick blender all the way to the bottom of the
    > jar.


    Awwwww, that takes all of the fun out if it! Fire that sucker up on high
    before submerging it! ;-)
    --
    Steve

    Every job is a self-portrait of the person who did it.
    Autograph your work with excellence.
     
  10. Dee Randall wrote:

    > "Bob" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Dee wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Has anyone used the "pasteurized eggs" to make mayonnaise. I've not
    >>>even seen in in grocery stores, but on the food channels they talk
    >>>about it as it is a common item.

    >>
    >>Yes, and it was FANTASTIC! Unfortunately, my grocery store stopped
    >>carrying pasteurized eggs back in September or October last year, so I
    >>haven't made mayonnaise since. Didn't make eggnog over the holidays,
    >>either. :-(
    >>
    >>I filled out one of those supermarket survey forms where you list items
    >>you WISH the store carried, and actually got a phone call from a regional
    >>representative for Safeway. In our conversation, she claimed that the
    >>store would start carrying the eggs again, but they never did. They've
    >>never been carried by any other stores in the area.
    >>
    >>Bob

    >
    >
    > I'm so sorry when this happens. Since you gave pasteurized eggs a good
    > recommendation, I will have to ask Martin's (which is a subsidiary, I think)
    > of the big Giants supermarket. I asked them to please put King Arthur flour
    > back on the shelves, and they did!!! When I see the manager bagging
    > groceries, I always thank him.
    >
    > Still, pasteurized eggs! After they are pasteurized, they are still runny,
    > right? And they look just like a raw egg, right?


    You can pasteurize eggs at home if you want to. They have to be heated
    to 150° in the top of a double boiler, and the few times I did it, I
    added some lemon juice to help keep them liquid The tough part is that
    if you heat them to 160°, they begin to thicken. It's gotta be
    accurate. But it can be done. You'll want a thermometer with a tip
    probe (like the Polder Alton Brown uses on tv, about $23). Most
    quick-reads don't - they read along the probe over a couple inches and
    give you a sort of average reading.

    I wouldn't bother, though. Make the mayo and let it sit in the fridge
    for a couple days. The low Ph and extremely low water activity will
    likely kill any bacteria.

    Pastorio
     
  11. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    Dee Randall wrote:

    > "Bob" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Dee wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Has anyone used the "pasteurized eggs" to make mayonnaise. I've not
    >>>even seen in in grocery stores, but on the food channels they talk
    >>>about it as it is a common item.

    >>
    >>Yes, and it was FANTASTIC! Unfortunately, my grocery store stopped
    >>carrying pasteurized eggs back in September or October last year, so I
    >>haven't made mayonnaise since. Didn't make eggnog over the holidays,
    >>either. :-(
    >>
    >>I filled out one of those supermarket survey forms where you list items
    >>you WISH the store carried, and actually got a phone call from a regional
    >>representative for Safeway. In our conversation, she claimed that the
    >>store would start carrying the eggs again, but they never did. They've
    >>never been carried by any other stores in the area.
    >>
    >>Bob

    >
    >
    > I'm so sorry when this happens. Since you gave pasteurized eggs a good
    > recommendation, I will have to ask Martin's (which is a subsidiary, I
    > think) of the big Giants supermarket. I asked them to please put King
    > Arthur flour back on the shelves, and they did!!! When I see the manager
    > bagging groceries, I always thank him.
    >
    > Still, pasteurized eggs! After they are pasteurized, they are still runny,
    > right? And they look just like a raw egg, right?


    You can pasteurize eggs at home if you want to. They have to be heated
    to 150° in the top of a double boiler, and the few times I did it, I
    added some lemon juice to help keep them liquid The tough part is that
    if you heat them to 160°, they begin to thicken. It's gotta be
    accurate. But it can be done. You'll want a thermometer with a tip
    probe (like the Polder Alton Brown uses on tv, about $23). Most
    quick-reads don't - they read along the probe over a couple inches and
    give you a sort of average reading.

    I wouldn't bother, though. Make the mayo and let it sit in the fridge
    for a couple days. The low Ph and extremely low water activity will
    likely kill any bacteria.

    Pastorio

    Thanks, Pastorio,
    I've looked at many sites after Googling "Alton Brown"+Polder. I've not
    been able to decide which of the few thermometers that you are speaking
    about. I'm interested. Just this morning after baking some bread, I kept 3
    pocket thermometers out to measure the temperature of some dough. The lines
    between each were so thin I could hardly tell what the temperature was, and
    besides I DROPPED 2 out of 3 of them. Just sick of those stick
    thermometers. Can you help look for the one you might be speaking of and
    post the link. The ones I saw were "you stick into the roast," or you kept
    it outside of the oven, or --- I just couldn't find one that would be
    appropriate for measuring water, dough, baked bread, and the egg @ 150 you
    were speaking about, that you might be talking about. Surely Alton Brown
    uses it as an all-purpose probe?
    Hoping you can help -- don't rush.
    Thanks,
    Dee
     
  12. Vox Humana

    Vox Humana Guest

    "Dee Randall" <deedoveyatshenteldotnet> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I've looked at many sites after Googling "Alton Brown"+Polder. I've not
    > been able to decide which of the few thermometers that you are speaking
    > about. I'm interested. Just this morning after baking some bread, I kept

    3
    > pocket thermometers out to measure the temperature of some dough. The

    lines
    > between each were so thin I could hardly tell what the temperature was,

    and
    > besides I DROPPED 2 out of 3 of them. Just sick of those stick
    > thermometers. Can you help look for the one you might be speaking of and
    > post the link. The ones I saw were "you stick into the roast," or you

    kept
    > it outside of the oven, or --- I just couldn't find one that would be
    > appropriate for measuring water, dough, baked bread, and the egg @ 150 you
    > were speaking about, that you might be talking about. Surely Alton Brown
    > uses it as an all-purpose probe?
    > Hoping you can help -- don't rush.
    > Thanks,
    > Dee



    I picked up an electronic probe thermometer like the Polder that AB uses.
    It was labeled "Accurite" and sold for $9.99 at my local Meijer store. It
    measures from about 35F to 399F and seems to be accurate when I tested it
    against two other thermometers and in boiling water. It is a no frills unit
    without any timers or clock, but I don't need another clock or timer. It
    has adjustable, pre-set temperature for most meat and a custom setting of
    your choice. It has an alarm to alert you when the set temperature is
    reached. Here is a link:
    http://www.partshelf.com/acurite-00724.html

    I have seen mentioned in Google searches that this product is available at
    Wal-Mart for $10.00
     
  13. Scott

    Scott Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected]onono (Nancree) wrote:

    > You can also do this in a food processor but you will probably have more
    > failures. (add the oil slowly as you blend). For me, it is so worth it to buy
    > a stick blender (Braun brand is best).



    Not meaning to be contradictory, but my first try was with a stick
    blender, and it failed. Ever since, I've used the food processor with no
    problems. Many FPs (including my Cuisinart) have a hollow pusher with a
    very small hole at the bottom. If you just pour the oil into the pusher
    after you power it up (with all the other ingredients in the bowl), it
    drizzles out at a perfect rate.

    --
    to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

    <http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/>
     
  14. Scott

    Scott Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Dee Randall" <deedoveyatshenteldotnet> wrote:

    > Has anyone used the "pasteurized eggs" to make mayonnaise. I've not
    > even seen in in grocery stores, but on the food channels they talk
    > about it as it is a common item. Thanks.


    Yep, I've used it. Worked just fine.

    --
    to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

    <http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/>
     
  15. Scott

    Scott Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Dee Randall" <deedoveyatshenteldotnet> wrote:

    > I'm so sorry when this happens. Since you gave pasteurized eggs a good
    > recommendation, I will have to ask Martin's (which is a subsidiary, I think)
    > of the big Giants supermarket. I asked them to please put King Arthur flour
    > back on the shelves, and they did!!! When I see the manager bagging
    > groceries, I always thank him.


    The things can be damn hard to find, depending upon where you live. Go
    here to find a local retailer (maybe):

    <http://www.safeeggs.com/markets/pavailability.html>

    You can also order them straight from the company; unfortunately, the
    shipping is the real dealbreaker:
    5 dozen - $13.95 ($2.79/doz); shipping and handling $15


    > Still, pasteurized eggs! After they are pasteurized, they are still runny,
    > right? And they look just like a raw egg, right? I only tried the whites in
    > a container once and I barely made it to the bathroom.


    The whites are a bit thicker and have turned somewhat more opaque. I
    think the yolks are a bit different, too, but I can't recall how. I used
    a half dozen to make a chocolate mousse, and it was perfect. The eggs
    were creamed with sugar, and the whites whipped to soft peaks.

    --
    to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

    <http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/>
     
  16. Mrmiss2

    Mrmiss2 Guest

    >Mayonnaise
    >From: Steve Calvin


    >Nancree wrote:
    >
    >> *Without* turning it on, put stick blender all the way to the bottom of

    >the
    >> jar.

    >
    >Awwwww, that takes all of the fun out if it! Fire that sucker up on high
    >before submerging it! ;-)
    >--
    >Steve
    >

    --------------------------
    Well, that would be good for the complexion, and maybe rub a little in your
    hair, too. <G>
    Nancree
     
  17. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Scott wrote:

    > The things can be damn hard to find, depending upon where you live. Go
    > here to find a local retailer (maybe):
    >
    > <http://www.safeeggs.com/markets/pavailability.html>


    I'm sad to say that the web site is wrong. It says that both Safeway and
    Trader Joe's carry pasteurized eggs. I got all excited seeing that, and
    called the number given for Safeway, only to be told that their line of
    pasteurized eggs was discontinued last year. So then I drove to Trader
    Joe's, only to find that they don't carry pasteurized eggs.

    The search continues...

    Bob
     
  18. Scott

    Scott Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Bob" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > I'm sad to say that the web site is wrong. It says that both Safeway and
    > Trader Joe's carry pasteurized eggs. I got all excited seeing that, and
    > called the number given for Safeway, only to be told that their line of
    > pasteurized eggs was discontinued last year. So then I drove to Trader
    > Joe's, only to find that they don't carry pasteurized eggs.


    Where do you live? Apparently, Trader Joe's buying setup is divided into
    (approximately) East and West Coasts:

    West Coast (AZ, CA, NM, NV, OR, WA)
    PO Box 5049
    Monrovia, CA 91017

    East Coast & Midwest
    (CT, DE, IL, IN, MA, MD, MI, MO, NJ, NY, OH, PA, VA)
    117 Kendrick Street, Suite 700
    Needham, MA 02494

    I called TJ's up a year or so ago, and at the time they said the West
    Coast division was buying it, but the East Coast/Midwest wasn't.

    I don't know what the situation with Safeway is.

    --
    to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

    <http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/>
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>, "Dee Randall"
    <deedoveyatshenteldotnet> wrote:
    (snip)
    > Still, pasteurized eggs! After they are pasteurized, they are still
    > runny, right? And they look just like a raw egg, right? I only tried
    > the whites in a container once and I barely made it to the bathroom.


    It's a very exacting process to pasteurize them in the shell. A local
    company does it (or did) -- Michael's Foods, I think. I've not heard
    anything about the yolks, but the whites are more difficult to beat to
    peaks -- takes quite a bit longer. Yes, they look like a raw egg. Yes,
    they are still runny.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Homemade mayonnaise pics added 1-29-05.
    "I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
    say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
    performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>, "Bob (this one)"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I wouldn't bother, though. Make the mayo and let it sit in the fridge
    > for a couple days. The low Ph and extremely low water activity will
    > likely kill any bacteria.
    >
    > Pastorio


    I'm counting on you, Pasto. . . gack. . . .choke. . . gasp
    (Made some an hour ago - pictures are posted.)
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Homemade mayonnaise pics added 1-29-05.
    "I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
    say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
    performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
     
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