Easy job? Spokes

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Stephen Clark, Jul 10, 2005.

  1. I have lost three spokes on the non-freewheel side of my road/tourer bike.
    Is it a trivial task to replace them? I can do simple stuff like punctures,
    chain removal/cleaning and brake block replacement but for anything beyond
    this I usually go to the LBS. I have a "nipple spanner" since I sometimes
    need to re-tension the spokes.
     
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  2. Call me Bob

    Call me Bob Guest

    On Sun, 10 Jul 2005 13:47:28 +0100, "Stephen Clark"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have lost three spokes on the non-freewheel side of my road/tourer bike.
    >Is it a trivial task to replace them? I can do simple stuff like punctures,
    >chain removal/cleaning and brake block replacement but for anything beyond
    >this I usually go to the LBS. I have a "nipple spanner" since I sometimes
    >need to re-tension the spokes.


    Not trivial, but reasonably straightforward, particularly if you
    already have some experience with a spoke key.

    You'll need replacement spokes of the correct length (LBS can help
    with that), and also matching nipples.

    Strip the tube and tyre from the wheel, thread the new spokes into the
    correct position and screw them into the new nipples. Bring them all
    up to proper tension, referring to other spokes as a guide, true the
    wheel and stress relieve the new spokes.

    It's not quite that simple, it takes a little care and some time to do
    properly if you aren't an experienced wheelbuilder, but I can manage
    it so I think most people will too.

    Read Sheldon's excellent guide to wheelbuilding, and apply that to the
    installation of just those new spokes that you need:

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html


    "Bob"
    --

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  3. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Stephen Clark
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > I have lost three spokes on the non-freewheel side of my road/tourer
    > bike. Is it a trivial task to replace them? I can do simple stuff like
    > punctures, chain removal/cleaning and brake block replacement but for
    > anything beyond this I usually go to the LBS. I have a "nipple spanner"
    > since I sometimes need to re-tension the spokes.


    If they're non-drive-side, and you're confident enough to true your
    wheels, replacing spokes will be a breeze. Make sure you get the right
    length is all.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    Morning had broken. I found a rather battered tube of Araldite
    resin in the bottom of the toolbag.
     
  4. At Sun, 10 Jul 2005 13:47:28 +0100, message
    <[email protected]> was posted by "Stephen Clark"
    <[email protected]>, including some, all or none of the following:

    >I have lost three spokes on the non-freewheel side of my road/tourer bike.
    >Is it a trivial task to replace them? I can do simple stuff like punctures,
    >chain removal/cleaning and brake block replacement but for anything beyond
    >this I usually go to the LBS. I have a "nipple spanner" since I sometimes
    >need to re-tension the spokes.


    Tolerably so, yes, but three breakages probably means there is a more
    serious problem with the wheel, so you should also make sure that all
    the spokes are correctly tensioned and stress-relieved. My
    wheelbuilder is so cheap that I have never bothered to learn the
    necessary skills (Bob Bristow, Reading's premier blind bike mechanic,
    trivia fans); I send all machine-built wheels off to Bob to be
    retensioned by hand, and have only ever broken one spoke, on the
    'bent, where the angles are very tight and the tension unusually high.


    Guy
    --
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    "To every complex problem there is a solution which is
    simple, neat and wrong" - HL Mencken
     
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