Easy Meal Prep franchises?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by maxine in ri, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. maxine in ri

    maxine in ri Guest

    NYT magazine sunday had an article on the 6-year-old phenomonon of meal
    prep places, where you make an appointment, pick your recipes, and when
    you arrive, they have work stations set up with your raw ingredients, a
    recipe, and a container to put it all in.

    For 12 6-serving entree's, the cost is about $200usd, and time
    scheduled is about 2 hours.. It's geared towards the harried family
    that doesn't have time to cook during the week. Pop those 12 entrees
    into your (assumedly empty of all but icecream and ice cubes) freezer,
    and thaw one for one of those nights when you're not getting home til
    late. Cooking instructions included.

    Am I missing something here? For $200, you're getting raw materials, a
    prep area with people who chop all your ingredients to spec, and the
    privilege of putting it together yourself? Are people that fearful of
    a knife and the time it takes to chop a few ingredients, that they'll
    pay someone to do it for them?

    Oh, this is not geared towards the restaurant chef audience, but the
    harried family cook/chauffeur/breadwinner.

    maxine in ri
     
    Tags:


  2. Dean G.

    Dean G. Guest

    maxine in ri wrote:
    > NYT magazine sunday had an article on the 6-year-old phenomonon of meal
    > prep places, where you make an appointment, pick your recipes, and when
    > you arrive, they have work stations set up with your raw ingredients, a
    > recipe, and a container to put it all in.
    >
    > For 12 6-serving entree's, the cost is about $200usd, and time
    > scheduled is about 2 hours.. It's geared towards the harried family
    > that doesn't have time to cook during the week. Pop those 12 entrees
    > into your (assumedly empty of all but icecream and ice cubes) freezer,
    > and thaw one for one of those nights when you're not getting home til
    > late. Cooking instructions included.
    >
    > Am I missing something here? For $200, you're getting raw materials, a
    > prep area with people who chop all your ingredients to spec, and the
    > privilege of putting it together yourself? Are people that fearful of
    > a knife and the time it takes to chop a few ingredients, that they'll
    > pay someone to do it for them?


    Perhaps there are many people willing to pay to be in charge of
    things.... Also, from a business standpoint, the chopping could be a
    liability issue if the customer was doing the chopping. I wouldn't LET
    them chop anything, or go near anything even remotely sharp.

    Dean G.
     
  3. maxine in Rio wrote:

    >
    > Am I missing something here? For $200, you're getting raw materials, a
    > prep area with people who chop all your ingredients to spec, and the
    > privilege of putting it together yourself? Are people that fearful of
    > a knife and the time it takes to chop a few ingredients, that they'll
    > pay someone to do it for them?
    >
    > Oh, this is not geared towards the restaurant chef audience, but the
    > harried family cook/chauffeur/breadwinner.
    >
    > maxine in ri
    >


    Personally, I think this is "Disney Land" cooking

    Abby

    --
    The ChildFree Abby Archives - http://www.dismal-light.net/childfreeabby/
     
  4. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    maxine in ri wrote:

    > Am I missing something here? For $200, you're getting raw materials, a
    > prep area with people who chop all your ingredients to spec, and the
    > privilege of putting it together yourself? Are people that fearful of
    > a knife and the time it takes to chop a few ingredients, that they'll
    > pay someone to do it for them?


    Add to that 2 hours the drive time to and fro', thaw time for the frozen
    entree, cooking time as well as efforts to round out the meal with other
    dishes and well.... For me, it probably would be just as fast and
    certainly no more expensive to stay and make it from scratch in the
    first place?
    Of course you're also paying for someone else's (the franchise)
    imagination as to what is possible. I'm pretty handy that way on my own. :)
     
  5. On Wed, 29 Mar 2006 05:57:47 -0500, Goomba38 <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >maxine in ri wrote:
    >
    >> Am I missing something here? For $200, you're getting raw materials, a
    >> prep area with people who chop all your ingredients to spec, and the
    >> privilege of putting it together yourself? Are people that fearful of
    >> a knife and the time it takes to chop a few ingredients, that they'll
    >> pay someone to do it for them?

    >
    >Add to that 2 hours the drive time to and fro', thaw time for the frozen
    >entree, cooking time as well as efforts to round out the meal with other
    >dishes and well.... For me, it probably would be just as fast and
    >certainly no more expensive to stay and make it from scratch in the
    >first place?
    >Of course you're also paying for someone else's (the franchise)
    >imagination as to what is possible. I'm pretty handy that way on my own. :)


    I know somebody who loves it. Her husband works night shift and she
    works days and they have a 12yo son, and she's always running around
    like a chook with it's head chopped off trying to get everything done.
    Plus they're trying to sell their house so they need to keep things
    show-room ready as much as possible because somebody might want to
    come and see it.
    So now she goes to the meal place once a month and makes her dozen
    meals (which she pays a little extra to split into half-dishes) and
    gets a few extra pre-frozen ones while she's at it, then brings them
    home and bungs them in the freezer and the 12yo can put dinner on at
    the appropriate time without messing up the kitchen. (apparantly he
    likes to cook but makes the most godawful mess while he's at it, and
    he doesn't clean up...)
    It wouldn't work for me because I actually like cooking and I have
    plenty of time for it most days, but I'm sure there are lots of women
    out there like her...
     
  6. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    Karen AKA Kajikit wrote:

    > I know somebody who loves it. Her husband works night shift and she
    > works days and they have a 12yo son, and she's always running around
    > like a chook with it's head chopped off trying to get everything done.
    > Plus they're trying to sell their house so they need to keep things
    > show-room ready as much as possible because somebody might want to
    > come and see it.
    > So now she goes to the meal place once a month and makes her dozen
    > meals (which she pays a little extra to split into half-dishes) and
    > gets a few extra pre-frozen ones while she's at it, then brings them
    > home and bungs them in the freezer and the 12yo can put dinner on at
    > the appropriate time without messing up the kitchen. (apparantly he
    > likes to cook but makes the most godawful mess while he's at it, and
    > he doesn't clean up...)
    > It wouldn't work for me because I actually like cooking and I have
    > plenty of time for it most days, but I'm sure there are lots of women
    > out there like her...


    But as also has been pointed out in the recent discussions about these
    places, they're only giving you an entree. No side dishes, no dessert.
    So if one wants a real dinner they still have to dirty up the kitchen a bit?
    Your friends are in a hard spot, especially trying to sell their house.
    I feel for them. Having to keep a home in order for showing is
    exhausting. :(
     
  7. Karen AKA Kajikit <[email protected]> hitched up their panties and
    posted news:[email protected]:

    >
    >
    > I know somebody who loves it. Her husband works night shift and she
    > works days and they have a 12yo son, and she's always running around
    > like a chook with it's head chopped off trying to get everything done.
    > Plus they're trying to sell their house so they need to keep things
    > show-room ready as much as possible because somebody might want to
    > come and see it.
    > So now she goes to the meal place once a month and makes her dozen
    > meals (which she pays a little extra to split into half-dishes) and
    > gets a few extra pre-frozen ones while she's at it, then brings them
    > home and bungs them in the freezer and the 12yo can put dinner on at
    > the appropriate time without messing up the kitchen. (apparantly he
    > likes to cook but makes the most godawful mess while he's at it, and
    > he doesn't clean up...)
    > It wouldn't work for me because I actually like cooking and I have
    > plenty of time for it most days, but I'm sure there are lots of women
    > out there like her...



    I can see where this would work. It may have worked long ago in this
    household. No longer would it work here. I find it a better alternative to
    fast food.

    Michael



    --
    "The most remarkable thing about my mother is that for thirty years she
    served the family nothing but leftovers. The original meal has never been
    found."

    --Calvin Trillin
     
Loading...