Eating Before Sleep

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by NYC XYZ, Mar 2, 2005.

  1. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    mjoann wrote:
    >
    >
    > And back to the original question, the only problem with eating

    before
    > bed is, as discovered, heartburn and acid. One effect of acid reflux

    is
    > it causes difficulty breathing as acid may irritate the airways. If I


    > lay down within 2-3 hours of eating, I wake up with horrific

    heartburn
    > and difficulty breathing that lasts for hours, other people may be

    more
    > lucky.
    >
    > mjoann



    Ah, thank you -- I too get heartburn from eating too close to bed,
    though not always; quite rarely, even. So there's nothing else "wrong"
    with eating before bed? I'm talking about a "real" meal, not just a
    "snack."

    Just curious, that's all. I don't typically eat close to bedtime, but
    sometimes the schedule does work out that way, and I was concerned.
    Nothing's wasted? It all gets digested, like normal? Like, after
    working out at the gym, getting home, and finally having ate...going to
    sleep isn't unhealthy, then?
     


  2. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    00doc wrote:
    >
    >
    > <SNIP>
    >
    >
    >
    > Nutritionally speaking I'm not sure we shouldn't get up at 3
    > am to eat. it would make sense. Personally, I like my sleep
    > too much to do that and I do have some doubts about whether
    > the decrease in sleep would be worth it.


    Actually, as a related side-note, the mid-night snack seems to have
    originated with a Medieval tradition of getting up in the middle of the
    night to visit neighbors and chit-chat. Just thought of it in the
    midst of all this.
     
  3. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    00doc wrote:
    >
    > <SNIP>
    >
    >
    > Sleep is not physically demanding in terms of work
    > output/calories burned. But it is a metabolically active
    > time and is when you do a lot of the recouperating rom your
    > day.


    Hmm! Is that why you hear all those trickling and grumbling noises at
    night!

    > That is why before and possibly durng the workout you should
    > be consuming light snacks that feature complex carbs


    You know, that's really interesting -- I've NEVER been bothered by
    strenuous exercise right after eating! Even in the Army, when that was
    like that norm...always wondered what was up with folks who had stomach
    cramps, etc., from strenous physical activity right after a meal.

    > but
    > then after the workout and before bed you shoul dbe
    > consuming protein. You need the carbs to burn during the
    > workout but the protein to repair the damage.


    I don't understand this bit about needing carbs to burn during the
    workout...doesn't the body just grab at the fat and burn that?? Why
    stick in more carbs?

    Boy, this shit's too much "rocket science" for me...I liked it better
    when I was 21 and just doing whatever the hell I wanted! If I wanted
    to eat it, I ate it! If I wanted to lift it, I lifted! If I felt like
    a siesta, I had one.

    Guess I'll just stick to trusting my genetics. ^_^
     
  4. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    I just want to know whatever happened to e-equals-m-c-squared. =d
     
  5. Larry Hodges

    Larry Hodges Guest

    drhowarddrfinedrhoward wrote:
    >> durng the workout you should
    >> be consuming light snacks

    >
    > This is the part I take issue with.


    At least he knows how to post in a newsgroup. Why don't you do us all a
    favor and try leaving the prior poster's name when you reply?
    --
    -Larry
     
  6. DZ

    DZ Guest

  7. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    "drhowarddrfinedrhoward" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Z%[email protected]
    > Do not eat right before bed time. It does not make you fatter but
    > the food will not digest until you wake in the morning. Then your
    > body tries to digest it along with breakfast. You may not eat as much
    > thus depriving yourself of nutrition for that day.


    And some people claim this board is devoid of humor. Dear Darwin awards,
    we have another candidate...
     
  8. 00doc

    00doc Guest

    Doug Freese wrote:
    > "drhowarddrfinedrhoward" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:Z%[email protected]
    >> Do not eat right before bed time. It does not make you
    >> fatter but
    >> the food will not digest until you wake in the morning.
    >> Then your
    >> body tries to digest it along with breakfast. You may
    >> not eat as
    >> much thus depriving yourself of nutrition for that day.

    >
    > And some people claim this board is devoid of humor. Dear
    > Darwin
    > awards, we have another candidate...


    Really. I mean - even if we assume for a second that this
    guy is right about not digesting food eaten before bed -
    then how is digesting it in the morning (and so not eating
    as much breakfast) worse than skipping the evening meal and
    just eating the breakfast?

    He is not only factually incorrect but logically
    inconsistent.

    --
    00doc
     
  9. 00doc

    00doc Guest

    drhowarddrfinedrhoward wrote:
    > My "buddy George" is a world class body builder. He's
    > written for
    > men's magazines since the 50s. Google for his name.


    I've known several state and national level body builders
    that knew not what they were doing. Often the best athletes
    make the worst coaches and vice versa.


    > George is in better shape than you are, I'm sure.


    He probably is - but not because of his indepth knowledge of
    physiology and nutrition.

    My advice - work out with him but leave the "book learn'in"
    to some other source.

    --
    00doc
     
  10. 00doc

    00doc Guest

    NYC XYZ wrote:
    > You know, that's really interesting -- I've NEVER been
    > bothered by
    > strenuous exercise right after eating! Even in the Army,
    > when that
    > was like that norm...always wondered what was up with
    > folks who had
    > stomach cramps, etc., from strenous physical activity
    > right after a
    > meal.


    If you work out hard about 45-60 minutes into it you will
    have burned though the muscle glycogen supplies and your
    body will be kicking into catabolism mode. Most people will
    feela let down in energy at that point.

    There are basically three wasy around this:
    1) Keep the strenuous part of the workout (heavy lifting -
    tough sets) to less than 45 minutes (which Simmons advocates
    anyway).

    2) Sip an energy drink during the workouts instead of water.

    3) Put something some complex carbs "in the tank" (i.e. the
    stomach) right before the workout so that they will digest
    and hit the blood streat during.


    Of course - I didn't list as reasonable what are probably
    the two most commonly done options:

    4) Lift like a high school girl.

    5) Go hungry and fight through the second half feeling like
    shit.


    > I don't understand this bit about needing carbs to burn
    > during the
    > workout...doesn't the body just grab at the fat and burn
    > that?? Why
    > stick in more carbs?


    You can burn fat but it is not that efficient. The body has
    trouble keeping up if it has the rely on fat metabolism.
    What usually happens is you feels sluggish during the
    workout and then afterwards the body will catch up and
    replete the glycogen stores from fat.



    > Boy, this shit's too much "rocket science" for me...I
    > liked it better
    > when I was 21 and just doing whatever the hell I wanted!
    > If I wanted
    > to eat it, I ate it! If I wanted to lift it, I lifted!
    > If I felt
    > like a siesta, I had one.


    When I was in college I used to be able to lie down on the
    mats outside the weight room that people were using for
    stretching and sit ups after my squat work-out, take a 15
    minute nap, and then get back up and finnish. It really
    freaked people out sometimes.

    --
    00doc
     
  11. 00doc

    00doc Guest

    NYC XYZ wrote:
    > 00doc wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> <SNIP>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Nutritionally speaking I'm not sure we shouldn't get up
    >> at 3
    >> am to eat. it would make sense. Personally, I like my
    >> sleep
    >> too much to do that and I do have some doubts about
    >> whether
    >> the decrease in sleep would be worth it.

    >
    > Actually, as a related side-note, the mid-night snack
    > seems to have
    > originated with a Medieval tradition of getting up in the
    > middle of
    > the night to visit neighbors and chit-chat. Just thought
    > of it in the
    > midst of all this.


    Good point - not all cultures go to bed at 10 and sleep 8
    hours. Many sleep more than once a day and so avoid the
    prolonged fasting. And it is not just hispanic cultures
    taking a siesta as a break from the mid-day heat. Many Asian
    cultures do it and many native cultures without electricity
    do a form of it. They go to sleep at sunset, wake up for a
    period in the middle of the night, then take another nap
    before dawn.

    Many experts argue that the western 8 hour fast (really 12
    for most people who do not eat before bed) and then
    breakfast is not a natural pattern for eating or sleeping.

    --
    00doc
     
  12. 00doc

    00doc Guest

    Blair P. Houghton wrote:

    >
    > You know what I don't get?
    >
    > I don't get why we have to store nitrogen when air is over
    > 70% it.


    We can't use the nitrogen in the air. In the air pairs of
    nitrogen atoms are tightly bound to each other and our
    bodies don't have a way to split them. That is usually done
    by bacteria living around the roots of plants. The nitrogen
    is then incorportated into plant amino acids/protiens and
    they work their way up the food chain until they end up in
    your powerbar.

    But really - it is not the nitrogen per se that is important
    anyway. Biochemists just use it as a marker for protien
    since carbohydrates and fats don't have it (or much if it).

    --
    00doc
     
  13. 00doc

    00doc Guest

    DZ wrote:
    >
    > They suggest that excess of protein may compromise
    > anabolic
    > environment over a training program.


    I'd be interested to know what they calssified as excess - 1
    gm/kg/day? 2? 3?

    I'd have no trouble imagining that at some point protien
    further supplementation becomes couterproductive but wonder
    where that point is.



    > They also looked at fat total and
    > relative intake since one criticism might be that diets
    > with more
    > protein could have reduced fat. However, they
    > statistically controlled
    > fat total and relative intake and still found negative
    > correlation
    > between the testosterone levels and protein intake.


    Exersize reduces testosterone levels as well so I'm not
    really sure I would waste too much time looking at that and
    trying to figure out what it means.

    --
    00doc
     
  14. dwacon

    dwacon Guest

    "NYC XYZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Hi, All:
    >
    > I've heard different things about eating before bed...it makes you fat,
    > food simply passes through without real benefit, interferes with a good
    > night's sleep...does anyone know (and/or have links/refs) regarding
    > this matter?




    I take that Nitrovarin (sp?) protein drink before bed with no problems, but
    eating a meal or even drinking before bed can cause heartburn and will give
    you scary dreams.


    --
    Paris Hilton uses one of these...
    http://tinyurl.com/z6uc
     
  15. Piezo Guru

    Piezo Guru Guest

    Not a good thing to hype your metabolism up before bed. As far as fat is
    concerned, I would be worried about developing a hiatal hernia problem after
    years of it.

    "NYC XYZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Hi, All:
    >
    > I've heard different things about eating before bed...it makes you fat,
    > food simply passes through without real benefit, interferes with a good
    > night's sleep...does anyone know (and/or have links/refs) regarding
    > this matter?
    >
    > I mean, is it a bad thing? (Unhealthy?) Why?
    >
    >
    > TIA!
    >
     
  16. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    00doc wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > Good point - not all cultures go to bed at 10 and sleep 8
    > hours. Many sleep more than once a day and so avoid the
    > prolonged fasting. And it is not just hispanic cultures
    > taking a siesta as a break from the mid-day heat. Many Asian
    > cultures do it and many native cultures without electricity
    > do a form of it. They go to sleep at sunset, wake up for a
    > period in the middle of the night, then take another nap
    > before dawn.
    >
    > Many experts argue that the western 8 hour fast (really 12
    > for most people who do not eat before bed) and then
    > breakfast is not a natural pattern for eating or sleeping.
    >
    > --
    > 00doc



    Indeed, there've been psychological experiments where folks are
    deprived of a clock and any other sign of time (windows to the outside
    world, etc.) to gauge what the human body's "natural rhythm" might be:
    turns out that we'd wake up around nine or ten in the morning if left
    to ourselves....
     
  17. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    00doc wrote:
    >
    >
    > If you work out hard about 45-60 minutes into it you will
    > have burned though the muscle glycogen supplies and your
    > body will be kicking into catabolism mode. Most people will
    > feela let down in energy at that point.


    Ah, hm...I guess it wasn't that strenuous, and not so prolonged either,
    then....

    > There are basically three wasy around this:
    > 1) Keep the strenuous part of the workout (heavy lifting -
    > tough sets) to less than 45 minutes (which Simmons advocates
    > anyway).
    >
    > 2) Sip an energy drink during the workouts instead of water.


    Energy drink?! Do you really believe in that stuff?? Why? What do
    you recommend??

    > 3) Put something some complex carbs "in the tank" (i.e. the
    > stomach) right before the workout so that they will digest
    > and hit the blood streat during.


    Again, I've never had problems (that I notice, anyway) from eating a
    real meal right before a workout, though I can't imagine, really, how
    it might be beneficial, either, to have something "in the tank"....

    > Of course - I didn't list as reasonable what are probably
    > the two most commonly done options:
    >
    > 4) Lift like a high school girl.
    >
    > 5) Go hungry and fight through the second half feeling like
    > shit.


    I have to admit, I rather enjoy that many times, pushing myself
    especially when I feel like crap...feels empowering in an "existential"
    way...it's only that just recently have I (noticeably, anyway) hurt
    myself by pushing myself...that's why I'm asking all these questions
    now, 'cause I've now hurt myself twice and I'm running a bit scared at
    what the hell else can go wrong...and it was the simplest thing, too:
    jogging! Pushed myself to keep sprinting...finally pulled a muscle --
    not debilitating, but serious enough to warrant a slight limp in my
    gait for a few weeks!

    > You can burn fat but it is not that efficient. The body has
    > trouble keeping up if it has the rely on fat metabolism.
    > What usually happens is you feels sluggish during the
    > workout and then afterwards the body will catch up and
    > replete the glycogen stores from fat.


    Ah, yes, I did read something about fat taking longer to get to and all
    that...but then again, I've also read in one of Arnold's books that
    working out too soon after eating means that blood cells are too busy
    with digestion and therefore not as many are devoted to delivering
    supplies to the muscles exercised....

    > When I was in college I used to be able to lie down on the
    > mats outside the weight room that people were using for
    > stretching and sit ups after my squat work-out, take a 15
    > minute nap, and then get back up and finnish. It really
    > freaked people out sometimes.
    >
    > --
    > 00doc


    LOL -- I'm still doing that in the locker room at the gym! I just go
    to sleep on the bench, probably all of ten minutes, and feel very
    refreshed afterwards. Problem is, though, too much trash talk in the
    locker rooms wake me up!
     
  18. 00doc

    00doc Guest

    NYC XYZ wrote:
    >>
    >> 2) Sip an energy drink during the workouts instead of
    >> water.

    >
    > Energy drink?! Do you really believe in that stuff??
    > Why? What do
    > you recommend??


    No - I think they are a waste of money. I prefer to eat a
    light snack a little before the workouts.



    >
    >> You can burn fat but it is not that efficient. The body
    >> has
    >> trouble keeping up if it has the rely on fat metabolism.
    >> What usually happens is you feels sluggish during the
    >> workout and then afterwards the body will catch up and
    >> replete the glycogen stores from fat.

    >
    > Ah, yes, I did read something about fat taking longer to
    > get to and
    > all that...but then again, I've also read in one of
    > Arnold's books
    > that working out too soon after eating means that blood
    > cells are too
    > busy with digestion and therefore not as many are devoted
    > to
    > delivering supplies to the muscles exercised....


    The "blood cells" don't so the digesting. They also don't do
    the lifting. So there you have it.



    That just goes back to my point about the best athletes not
    always being the best coaches.


    > LOL -- I'm still doing that in the locker room at the gym!
    > I just go
    > to sleep on the bench, probably all of ten minutes, and
    > feel very
    > refreshed afterwards. Problem is, though, too much trash
    > talk in the
    > locker rooms wake me up!


    I don't know why some people find that so weird.

    --
    00doc
     
  19. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    00doc wrote:
    >
    >
    > No - I think they are a waste of money. I prefer to eat a
    > light snack a little before the workouts.


    Ah, well, I'm surprised you offered it as an option, then.

    > The "blood cells" don't so the digesting. They also don't do
    > the lifting. So there you have it.


    Well, it was something along the lines of blood cells having to
    distribute nutrients -- or whatever aspect of digestion they're
    involved in -- and therefore, I dunno, not having time to do
    oxygen/carbon dioxide work, I guess, IIRC...!

    > That just goes back to my point about the best athletes not
    > always being the best coaches.


    Yeah, it's true -- hard to know whom to trust!

    > I don't know why some people find that so weird.


    I used to have lunch in the locker rooms too when my schedule was
    different! It just seemed like the thing to do when spending so much
    time at the gym...the eat in the office/sleep over at the office kind
    of thing!

    > --
    > 00doc
     
  20. Peter Allen

    Peter Allen Guest

    "NYC XYZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > 00doc wrote:
    >>
    >> 2) Sip an energy drink during the workouts instead of water.

    >
    > Energy drink?! Do you really believe in that stuff?? Why? What do
    > you recommend??


    Don't know quite whether you mean energy drink as in
    carbs+electrolytes+water or as in red bull type stuff, but...

    In the first case, there's not much that needs 'belief'. The carbs,
    whichever form they're in (cheap = sugar, less cheap = mix of sugars and
    more complex carbs that are supposed to be better), provide you with a bit
    more energy. Not really any different to drinking water and eating a bit,
    just more convenient, if you're lifting. If you're doing hard cardio stuff
    and sweating a lot, then the electrolytes bit is good; it replaces the salt
    you lose sweating; if you're sweating out more than a litre in your workout
    you should replace the salt you lose.

    In the second case, you have more sugar, usually no electrolytes, some
    caffeine and a few other enhance-marketing things. Won't hydrate you all
    that well, but you can always get some water at the gym, and it won't make
    much difference if you're lifting. More sugar might help if you starved
    yourself before lifting, otherwise makes little difference. Caffeine is a
    stimulant and will probably have some minor positive effect on your lifts.
    But they tend to be overpriced. If you want caffeine, caffeine pills are
    much cheaper, coffee is a lot nicer and (if you make it) also cheaper. You
    don't want to drink these if you're doing long cardio work - you'll get
    dehydrated, low on salt, high on caffeine (which will damage performance and
    isn't really much fun), and light on wallet.

    Peter
     
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