Eats

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Paul D, Aug 30, 2004.

  1. Paul D

    Paul D Guest

    Following on from the 'isotonic rip off' thread the other day, am i expected
    to pay nearly a quid for a few mouthfuls of energy bar?! They can't be that
    good, surely?

    So I was wondering what everybody uses instead? A while ago a runner friend
    explained to me in detail how jelly babies are full of energy, and every now
    and then i put a handful in a pocket for halfway round a ride, but i've
    never been completely convinced. A strategic mars bar when i'm suffering
    with 10 or 15 miles to get home always works wonders though.

    Paul
     
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  2. davek

    davek Guest

    Paul D wrote:
    > So I was wondering what everybody uses instead?


    Bananas, raisins, apples, dried apricots, peanut butter & strawberry jam
    sandwiches, the occasional chocolate bar.

    And lots and lots of CAKE. :)

    A while ago a runner friend
    > explained to me in detail how jelly babies are full of energy


    They're full of sugar, which is almost the same thing but not quite.
    Nice idea, though, and I do love jelly babies, so any excuse...

    d.
     
  3. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Paul D wrote:

    > Following on from the 'isotonic rip off' thread the other day, am i expected
    > to pay nearly a quid for a few mouthfuls of energy bar?! They can't be that
    > good, surely?
    >
    > So I was wondering what everybody uses instead? A while ago a runner friend
    > explained to me in detail how jelly babies are full of energy, and every now
    > and then i put a handful in a pocket for halfway round a ride, but i've
    > never been completely convinced. A strategic mars bar when i'm suffering
    > with 10 or 15 miles to get home always works wonders though.
    >


    You want stuff with complex sugars in. Sugar itself will just cause
    your insulin response to kick in and leave you worse off.

    Figgy biscuits are good (although too many can have side effects!)
    otherwise make your own -
    http://sportsmedicine.about.com/cs/nutrition/a/aa062403a.htm - and vary
    the recipe to suit your own tastes.

    Tony
     
  4. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Tony Raven wrote:

    > You want stuff with complex sugars in.


    i.e., unrefined sugar. Fruit good in this respect.

    > Sugar itself will just cause
    > your insulin response to kick in and leave you worse off.


    Usually, yes, but a bit like alcohol actually cooling you down it can
    still be nice as a warmer if it's actually your /spirits/ that need
    warming rather than your body, and same goes for chocolate. I like
    chocolate, and if it's morale that's really the low point then it does
    me some good. Another one of these is coffee, usually bad as it's a
    diuretic, but I /like/ coffee and it helps with the mind game, if not
    the actual body game.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  5. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Tony Raven wrote:


    >
    > You want stuff with complex sugars in. Sugar itself will just cause
    > your insulin response to kick in and leave you worse off.


    Whenever I have looked into this I have not found very consistent
    answers. The glycaemic index of things like white bread and boiled
    potatoes is higher than ordinary white sugar.

    James
    --
    If I have seen further than others, it is
    by treading on the toes of giants.
    http://www.ne.jp/asahi/julesandjames/home/
     
  6. Roos Eisma

    Roos Eisma Guest

    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> writes:

    >Usually, yes, but a bit like alcohol actually cooling you down it can
    >still be nice as a warmer if it's actually your /spirits/ that need
    >warming rather than your body, and same goes for chocolate. I like
    >chocolate, and if it's morale that's really the low point then it does
    >me some good. Another one of these is coffee, usually bad as it's a
    >diuretic, but I /like/ coffee and it helps with the mind game, if not
    >the actual body game.


    Chocolate has a fair amount of fat and protein in it as well, which
    supposedly brings down the GI value.

    The banoffie pie in North Queensferry yesterday was a very nice way of
    eating bananas :)

    (and I just saw Green&Blacks will do a butterscotch flavour from
    September... and a ginger one)

    Roos
     
  7. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:cgv30f$lr5one
    of these is coffee, usually bad as it's a
    > diuretic, but I /like/ coffee and it helps with the mind game, if not
    > the actual body game.


    That's right. On my century last month I kept a can of Red Bull in my
    pocket as a "get out of jail card". I didn't actually use it until 90 miles
    in, it had more of an effect just sitting there unopened!
    --
    Simon M.
     
  8. What do you *like*?

    I also like jelly babies, licorice allsorts, biscuits and CAKE.

    What do you crave or fancy?

    If you've been exercising for a long time, you probably don't need to
    worry about the insulin response anyway.

    So eat what you (or your budget) *like* and wash it down with something
    you *like* drinking. Mine's a diet fruit squash...

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
  9. James Annan <[email protected]>typed


    > Tony Raven wrote:



    > >
    > > You want stuff with complex sugars in. Sugar itself will just cause
    > > your insulin response to kick in and leave you worse off.


    > Whenever I have looked into this I have not found very consistent
    > answers. The glycaemic index of things like white bread and boiled
    > potatoes is higher than ordinary white sugar.


    and it's much easier to cram down 100g of sugar as jelly babies than
    500g of boiled spud...

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
  10. Jack Ouzzi

    Jack Ouzzi Guest

    On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 12:18:15 +0100, Tony Raven <[email protected]>
    wrote:



    >You want stuff with complex sugars in. Sugar itself will just cause
    >your insulin response to kick in and leave you worse off.



    Complex cakes for davek then !!
     
  11. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    davek wrote:

    > dried apricots,


    Be careful with these; for obvious reasons!
     
  12. Jack Ouzzi

    Jack Ouzzi Guest

    On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 12:07:37 +0100, davek <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Paul D wrote:
    >> So I was wondering what everybody uses instead?

    >
    >Bananas, raisins, apples, dried apricots, peanut butter & strawberry jam
    >sandwiches, the occasional chocolate bar.
    >


    Yep about spot on! Maybe some honey butties as well .......

    >
    >They're full of sugar, which is almost the same thing but not quite.
    >Nice idea, though, and I do love jelly babies, so any excuse...
    >


    Ooh thats OK then I will run with this :)
     
  13. Paul D wrote:
    > Following on from the 'isotonic rip off' thread the other day, am i
    > expected to pay nearly a quid for a few mouthfuls of energy bar?!
    > They can't be that good, surely?
    >
    > So I was wondering what everybody uses instead? A while ago a runner
    > friend explained to me in detail how jelly babies are full of energy,
    > and every now and then i put a handful in a pocket for halfway round
    > a ride, but i've never been completely convinced. A strategic mars
    > bar when i'm suffering with 10 or 15 miles to get home always works
    > wonders though.
    >
    > Paul


    I use energy bars of the Maxim variety ATM. Ordinary food is just as good
    but usually less convenient to carry, unwrap and eat in motion.
    Confectionary will appear to work for a short while, your blood sugar will
    surge up, you'll feel good then it'll plumet again and you'l feel crap.

    Use whatever works for you - I do.
     
  14. davek

    davek Guest

    Helen Deborah Vecht wrote:
    > and it's much easier to cram down 100g of sugar as jelly babies than
    > 500g of boiled spud...


    ....especially when riding a bike.

    d.
     
  15. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    paul[email protected] says...
    > Following on from the 'isotonic rip off' thread the other day, am i expected
    > to pay nearly a quid for a few mouthfuls of energy bar?! They can't be that
    > good, surely?
    >
    > So I was wondering what everybody uses instead? A while ago a runner friend
    > explained to me in detail how jelly babies are full of energy, and every now
    > and then i put a handful in a pocket for halfway round a ride, but i've
    > never been completely convinced. A strategic mars bar when i'm suffering
    > with 10 or 15 miles to get home always works wonders though.


    Soreen Malt Load! It contains almost the same energy content as the
    energy bars, is vaguely natural (Not wholly processed sugar) and from
    the reports I've heard works very well. They also do a banana loaf which
    is slightly less energy rich, but still very good.

    The advantage of the Malt Loaf is that it will fit into one of the
    normal pockets on the back of a cycling jersey (And can be compressed if
    it doesn't). Just remember to keep drinking the water at the same time.

    Jon
     
  16. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > > Whenever I have looked into this I have not found very consistent
    > > answers. The glycaemic index of things like white bread and boiled
    > > potatoes is higher than ordinary white sugar.

    >
    > and it's much easier to cram down 100g of sugar as jelly babies than
    > 500g of boiled spud...


    The problem still remains that a sudden rise in glucose will result in a
    similar rise in insulin. When the glucose stops coming, you'll still
    have a stack of insulin floating around and you'll be merrily producing
    glycogen and running low on blood-sugar. This won't be as pronounced
    when exercising, but it is a risk. You could probably minimise the
    effects with adrenaline, but this would either involve scaring yourself
    on cue, or injections... neither of which is a brilliant idea.

    Jon
     
  17. Paul D wrote:
    > Following on from the 'isotonic rip off' thread the other day, am i expected
    > to pay nearly a quid for a few mouthfuls of energy bar?! They can't be that
    > good, surely?
    >
    > So I was wondering what everybody uses instead? A while ago a runner friend
    > explained to me in detail how jelly babies are full of energy, and every now
    > and then i put a handful in a pocket for halfway round a ride, but i've
    > never been completely convinced. A strategic mars bar when i'm suffering
    > with 10 or 15 miles to get home always works wonders though.


    Anything made of oats is good.
     
  18. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    davek wrote:
    > Paul D wrote:
    >
    >> So I was wondering what everybody uses instead?

    >
    >
    > Bananas, raisins, apples, dried apricots, peanut butter & strawberry jam
    > sandwiches, the occasional chocolate bar.
    >
    > And lots and lots of CAKE. :)
    >
    > A while ago a runner friend
    >
    >> explained to me in detail how jelly babies are full of energy

    >
    >
    > They're full of sugar, which is almost the same thing but not quite.
    > Nice idea, though, and I do love jelly babies, so any excuse...
    >
    > d.


    I recently saw chocolate (and yogurt) covered banana chips (dried).
    They looked like an excellent thing to snack on while out riding. Not
    managed to locate them at a decent price though (this was in a service
    station up the M1 somewhere).


    --


    Velvet
     
  19. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Velvet wrote:

    > I recently saw chocolate (and yogurt) covered banana chips (dried). They
    > looked like an excellent thing to snack on while out riding. Not
    > managed to locate them at a decent price though (this was in a service
    > station up the M1 somewhere).


    Not seen the choc covered ones, but yoghurt ones seem reasonably common
    in health food shops. The student union shop has recently started
    selling them here. They're not especially cheap, though not
    outrageously overpriced, and they are very nice and you can probably kid
    yourself that it's Very Healthy ;-)

    Also seen yog covered raisins, which are dead nice IMHO.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  20. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Velvet wrote:
    >
    >
    > I recently saw chocolate (and yogurt) covered banana chips (dried). They
    > looked like an excellent thing to snack on while out riding. Not
    > managed to locate them at a decent price though (this was in a service
    > station up the M1 somewhere).
    >
    >


    Chocolate covered coffee beans. Mmmmmmmmm.....

    Tony
     
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