egg poacher question

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Gabadab, Feb 27, 2004.

  1. Gabadab

    Gabadab Guest

    I have one of those itens that have little cups that you crack the egg into and the steam from the
    surrounding boiling water cooks it.

    What can I do to make this item serve a more exciting egg?
     
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  2. Notbob

    Notbob Guest

    On 2004-02-28, gabadab <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What can I do to make this item serve a more exciting egg?

    You might try using different flavored butters to oil the cups. The best use of a poached egg is
    eggs benedict. You can go crazy with this dish.

    nb
     
  3. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    gabadab wrote:

    > I have one of those itens that have little cups that you crack the egg into and the steam from the
    > surrounding boiling water cooks it.
    >
    > What can I do to make this item serve a more exciting egg?

    Throw out the little cups and do the eggs right in the water (with a little vinegar added).
     
  4. Zenit

    Zenit Guest

    On 27 Feb 2004 17:35:56 -0800,
    [email protected] (gabadab)
    had to open a new box of zerones to say:

    >I have one of those itens that have little cups that you crack the egg into and the steam from the
    >surrounding boiling water cooks it.
    >
    >What can I do to make this item serve a more exciting egg?

    The addition of lipstick and garter belts always works for me... Saving that, condiments or sauces
    might spiff things up...

    Note: The lipstick and garter belts are for the eggs...

    <! -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- > zenit
     
  5. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    >Dave Smith writes:
    >
    >gabadab wrote:
    >
    >> I have one of those items that have little cups that you crack the egg into and the steam from
    >> the surrounding boiling water cooks it.
    >>
    >> What can I do to make this item serve a more exciting egg?
    >
    >Throw out the little cups and do the eggs right in the water

    That doesn't answer/address the question, how does your method produce poached eggs as visually
    appetizing or tastey as those attractively formed ones do cooked in butter... only improvement is to
    be sure to get one with D cups.

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  6. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <K%S%[email protected]_s52>,
    notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2004-02-28, gabadab <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > What can I do to make this item serve a more exciting egg?
    >
    > You might try using different flavored butters to oil the cups. The best use of a poached egg is
    > eggs benedict. You can go crazy with this dish.
    >
    > nb

    Oh yeah!!! ;-)

    K.

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  7. Anthony

    Anthony Guest

    "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Throw out the little cups and do the eggs right in the water (with a little vinegar added).
    >
    Yes, the whites of your steamed eggs have a rubbery consistency unlike those of properly poached
    ones. Eggs Benedict made with smoked salmon instead of Canadian bacon is my favorite way to eat
    poached eggs.
     
  8. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Anthony" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > Throw out the little cups and do the eggs right in the water (with a little vinegar added).
    > >
    > Yes, the whites of your steamed eggs have a rubbery consistency unlike those of properly poached
    > ones. Eggs Benedict made with smoked salmon instead of Canadian bacon is my favorite way to eat
    > poached eggs.
    >
    >

    Oooh, damn that sounds good! :) We usually just use ham, but now I'm gonna have to try that!

    Lox "trimmings" are usually pretty cheap.

    K.

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  9. Puester

    Puester Guest

    gabadab wrote:
    >
    > I have one of those itens that have little cups that you crack the egg into and the steam from the
    > surrounding boiling water cooks it.
    >
    > What can I do to make this item serve a more exciting egg?

    Exciting egg??? Jeezum. I would never have though of the necessity to make an egg exciting.

    Serve the egg with hollandaise or bearnaise sauce or salsa or chutney or....whatever.

    gloria p
     
  10. Denise~*

    Denise~* Guest

    On Sat, 28 Feb 2004 07:17:01 -0500, "Anthony" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >> Throw out the little cups and do the eggs right in the water (with a little vinegar added).
    >>
    >Yes, the whites of your steamed eggs have a rubbery consistency unlike those of properly poached
    >ones. Eggs Benedict made with smoked salmon instead of Canadian bacon is my favorite way to eat
    >poached eggs.
    >

    I actually did 1 poached egg this morning in a little "cup" thingy. Turned out *perfect*

    Denise, Brian & Wyatt (May 31, 02)

    How much Healthy Choice ice cream can I eat before it's no longer a healthy choice?
     
  11. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Denise~* wrote:

    > >> Throw out the little cups and do the eggs right in the water (with a little vinegar added).
    > >>
    > >Yes, the whites of your steamed eggs have a rubbery consistency unlike those of properly poached
    > >ones. Eggs Benedict made with smoked salmon instead of Canadian bacon is my favorite way to eat
    > >poached eggs.
    > >
    >
    > I actually did 1 poached egg this morning in a little "cup" thingy. Turned out *perfect*

    I came across the perfect thingamajig for poaching eggs last year. It is a cup like affair with
    short legs, holes in the bottom for drainage and a vertical handle. You butter it, stick it in the
    simmering water (with vinegar) and crack an egg into it. It keeps the egg together, allows for easy
    removal and the eggs do not hold those little ponds of water that make your toast soggy.
     
  12. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Denise~* wrote:
    >
    > > >> Throw out the little cups and do the eggs right in the water (with a little vinegar added).
    > > >>
    > > >Yes, the whites of your steamed eggs have a rubbery consistency unlike those of properly
    > > >poached ones. Eggs Benedict made with smoked salmon instead of Canadian bacon is my favorite
    > > >way to eat poached eggs.
    > > >
    > >
    > > I actually did 1 poached egg this morning in a little "cup" thingy. Turned out *perfect*
    >
    > I came across the perfect thingamajig for poaching eggs last year. It is a cup like affair with
    > short legs, holes in the bottom for drainage and a vertical handle. You butter it, stick it in the
    > simmering water (with vinegar) and crack an egg into it. It keeps the egg together, allows for
    > easy removal and the eggs do not hold those little ponds of water that make your toast soggy.
    >

    A steamer insert??? Man, I never even considered using one of those for water poaching eggs. What a
    great idea! :)

    Thanks! K

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  13. BillKirch

    BillKirch Guest

    >Throw out the little cups and do the eggs right in the water (with a little vinegar added).
    >

    #####################
    Yes ..and whirlpool the water with a spoon and that will also keep the eggs together. BG
     
  14. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Katra wrote:

    > > keeps the egg together, allows for easy removal and the eggs do not hold those little ponds of
    > > water that make your toast soggy.
    > >
    >
    > A steamer insert??? Man, I never even considered using one of those for water poaching eggs. What
    > a great idea! :)

    Not a steamer insert. It is immersed into the simmering water. It is more like a large draining
    spoon on short legs and a rod like handle that sticks straight up. It just helps to hold the egg
    together while it is poaching. It also keeps the egg from settling on the bottom of the pan, which
    sometimes causes the yolks to break , causing you to lose the best part of the poached egg. FWIW, it
    came from a local Home Hardware store, but I have never seen them at any of their other stores.

    I have tried poaching eggs in these trays that sit over the water, in rings directing in the water,
    and loose in the water (with a bit of vinegar of course), but these poaching "spoons" have been the
    best by far because they provide direct contact to the water, keep the eggs together, and they are
    easily drained. I like poached eggs on toast and I really had it when the eggs hold little pockets
    of water that break open and make the toast soggy.
     
  15. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Katra wrote:
    >
    > > > keeps the egg together, allows for easy removal and the eggs do not hold those little ponds of
    > > > water that make your toast soggy.
    > > >
    > >
    > > A steamer insert??? Man, I never even considered using one of those for water poaching eggs.
    > > What a great idea! :)
    >
    > Not a steamer insert. It is immersed into the simmering water. It is more like a large draining
    > spoon on short legs and a rod like handle that sticks straight up. It just helps to hold the egg
    > together while it is poaching. It also keeps the egg from settling on the bottom of the pan, which
    > sometimes causes the yolks to break , causing you to lose the best part of the poached egg. FWIW,
    > it came from a local Home Hardware store, but I have never seen them at any of their other stores.
    >
    > I have tried poaching eggs in these trays that sit over the water, in rings directing in the
    > water, and loose in the water (with a bit of vinegar of course), but these poaching "spoons" have
    > been the best by far because they provide direct contact to the water, keep the eggs together, and
    > they are easily drained. I like poached eggs on toast and I really had it when the eggs hold
    > little pockets of water that break open and make the toast soggy.
    >
    >

    Ok, but since I've never seen one, you've given me an idea... <G> Those steamer things are also on
    short legs with a rod handle in the center, but they have iris type "wings" around the sides making
    them adjustable to various pan sizes.

    Normally I just boil my water with a touch of salt, then swirl it so it makes a vortex before
    dropping the eggs in, wait until the white sets up and remove with a slotted pasta spoon, one of
    those big round ones.

    This idea sounds much easier. :)

    I do own a poacher tho, the one with the little metal dishes and have not used it in years. I may
    have to ressurect that tool as I like them that way also.

    Normally I'm lazy and just pan steam them in the cast iron skillet with a lid. <G>

    Heat a cast iron skillet and drop in a bit of EVOO, and break the eggs into a bowl. Drop them into
    the hot oil and cover with a SOLID cast iron lid, wait about 30 seconds and carefully and quickly
    add about 1/4 cup of cold water to the hot pan and re-cover immediately! This causes some very,
    very hot steam to form that rapidly cooks the egg. Usually 2 to 3 minutes depending on how well
    done you like it.

    Not really poaching, but close. :)

    K.

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  16. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    --------------7FF45B3F4F2618DFF0EE86E7
    Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

    Katra wrote:

    >
    > Normally I just boil my water with a touch of salt, then swirl it so it makes a vortex before
    > dropping the eggs in, wait until the white sets up and remove with a slotted pasta spoon, one of
    > those big round ones.

    That's a great way to do a single poached egg, but I have never mastered getting a second or third
    egg in the same pot.

    > I do own a poacher tho, the one with the little metal dishes and have not used it in years. I may
    > have to ressurect that tool as I like them that way also.

    I have two poachers. One of them has a tray with 4 "cups" for eggs. It is a non-stick material that
    always sticks unless well buttered. The other is one with four removable egg cups that my wife had
    bought for her father, but he didn't like it and gave it back to her. I don't like it either. We
    have found other used for the pan minus the poacher parts.

    > Normally I'm lazy and just pan steam them in the cast iron skillet with a lid. <G>
    >
    > Heat a cast iron skillet and drop in a bit of EVOO, and break the eggs into a bowl. Drop them into
    > the hot oil and cover with a SOLID cast iron lid, wait about 30 seconds and carefully and quickly
    > add about 1/4 cup of cold water to the hot pan and re-cover immediately! This causes some very,
    > very hot steam to form that rapidly cooks the egg. Usually 2 to 3 minutes depending on how well
    > done you like it.

    I like them like that too. I use s a small cast iron pan and any available lit. I only use about a
    Tbsp. of water. Sure, it escapes through the pouring lip on the pan, but it works fast enough that
    it does the job before all the steam escapes. This method allows me to do an egg sunny side up
    without charring the bottom.

    >
    >
    > Not really poaching, but close. :)
    >
    > K.
    >
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    <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> Katra wrote: <blockquote
    TYPE=CITE> <br>Normally I just boil my water with a touch of salt, then swirl it so it
    <br>makes a vortex before dropping the eggs in, wait until the white sets up <br>and remove with a
    slotted pasta spoon, one of those big round ones.</blockquote> That's a great way to do a single
    poached egg, but I have never mastered getting a second or third egg in the same pot. <blockquote
    TYPE=CITE>I do own a poacher tho, the one with the little metal dishes and have <br>not used it in
    years. I may have to ressurect that tool as I like them <br>that way also.</blockquote> I have two
    poachers. One of them has a tray with 4 "cups" for eggs. It is a non-stick material that always
    sticks unless well buttered. The other is one with four removable egg cups that my wife had bought
    for her father, but he didn't like it and gave it back to her. I don't like it either.
    We have found other used for the pan minus the poacher parts. <blockquote TYPE=CITE>Normally I'm
    lazy and just pan steam them in the cast iron skillet with <br>a lid. <G>
    <p>Heat a cast iron skillet and drop in a bit of EVOO, and break the eggs <br>into a bowl. Drop them
    into the hot oil and cover with a SOLID cast iron <br>lid, wait about 30 seconds and carefully
    and quickly add about 1/4 cup <br>of cold water to the hot pan and re-cover immediately! This
    causes some <br>very, very hot steam to form that rapidly cooks the egg. Usually 2 to 3
    <br>minutes depending on how well done you like it.</blockquote> I like them like that too. I use
    s a small cast iron pan and any available
    lit. I only use about a Tbsp. of water. Sure, it escapes through the pouring lip on the pan,
    but it works fast enough that it does the job before all the steam escapes. This method
    allows me to do an egg sunny side up without charring the bottom. <br> <blockquote
    TYPE=CITE>
    <p>Not really poaching, but close. :)
    <p>A.
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  17. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Katra wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Normally I just boil my water with a touch of salt, then swirl it so it makes a vortex before
    > > dropping the eggs in, wait until the white sets up and remove with a slotted pasta spoon, one of
    > > those big round ones.
    >
    > That's a great way to do a single poached egg, but I have never mastered getting a second or third
    > egg in the same pot.
    >
    > > I do own a poacher tho, the one with the little metal dishes and have not used it in years. I
    > > may have to ressurect that tool as I like them that way also.
    >
    > I have two poachers. One of them has a tray with 4 "cups" for eggs. It is a non-stick material
    > that always sticks unless well buttered. The other is one with four removable egg cups that my
    > wife had bought for her father, but he didn't like it and gave it back to her. I don't like it
    > either. We have found other used for the pan minus the poacher parts.

    One can never have too many pans. <G> My poacher is just plain SS and I buttered the cups well by
    hand back when I did use it. Turned out pretty good, but I still had to scrub them.

    >
    > > Normally I'm lazy and just pan steam them in the cast iron skillet with a lid. <G>
    > >
    > > Heat a cast iron skillet and drop in a bit of EVOO, and break the eggs into a bowl. Drop them
    > > into the hot oil and cover with a SOLID cast iron lid, wait about 30 seconds and carefully and
    > > quickly add about 1/4 cup of cold water to the hot pan and re-cover immediately! This causes
    > > some very, very hot steam to form that rapidly cooks the egg. Usually 2 to 3 minutes depending
    > > on how well done you like it.
    >
    > I like them like that too. I use s a small cast iron pan and any available
    > lit. I only use about a Tbsp. of water. Sure, it escapes through the pouring lip on the pan, but
    > it works fast enough that it does the job before all the steam escapes. This method allows
    > me to do an egg sunny side up without charring the bottom.
    >
    >

    Sunny side up, but with a slight film and I don't mind that. :) No charring on the bottom unless I
    got the oil too hot. <G>

    Bacon grease can be phun too...

    K.

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