El cheapo jersey

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Paul_MCMLIX, Oct 25, 2003.

  1. Rod Hunter

    Rod Hunter Guest

    If your in Melbourne there is a story on Sydeny road called
    Episode which stocks 2nd hand jerseys I got my three from there
    from about $15 each.
    ---------------------

    I was intrigued by the reference to the 2nd hand jerseys in Syndey Rd,
    Brunswick, so I phoned them.

    Episode is a 2nd-hand clothing store specialising in clothes from Europe
    and the US. The clothing range includes cycling jerseys and, to a lesser
    extent, jackets and sometimes shorts. The jerseys come in Lycra, wool
    and acrylic. The Lycra specials start at $5. The wool $20 - $40. Epsiode
    hrs are 9 -6 Mon - Wed & Sat; 9 - 8 Thu, Fri; & 11 - 6 Sat.

    (I have absolutely no vested interest in Episode)



    --
    >--------------------------<

    Posted via cyclingforums.com
    http://www.cyclingforums.com
     


  2. Rod Hunter

    Rod Hunter Guest

    If your in Melbourne there is a story on Sydeny road called
    Episode which stocks 2nd hand jerseys I got my three from there
    from about $15 each.
    ---------------------

    I was intrigued by the reference to the 2nd hand jerseys in Syndey Rd,
    Brunswick, so I phoned them.

    Episode is a 2nd-hand clothing store specialising in clothes from Europe
    and the US. The clothing range includes cycling jerseys and, to a lesser
    extent, jackets and sometimes shorts. The jerseys come in Lycra, wool
    and acrylic. The Lycra specials start at $5. The wool $20 - $40. Epsiode
    hrs are 9 -6 Mon - Wed & Sat; 9 - 8 Thu, Fri; & 11 - 6 Sat.

    Episode contact details: 175 Sydney Rd, Brunswick. 03 9380 1777.

    (I have absolutely no vested interest in Episode)



    --
    >--------------------------<

    Posted via cyclingforums.com
    http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  3. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    Fred Nieman <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Graeme, I respectfully differ on both points you make.
    >


    Fair enough (sorry to dredge up this old thread, I've not been online for a
    while). I think any problem with my previous statements probably stems from
    the fact that the original conversation I mentioned covered about 6
    different topics (all the best ones do). We had at one point been
    discussing the "fluoro" glow from watches etc. (i.e. glows once the
    stimulating light source is removed) and this may have been the type of
    colouring/dye that is difficult/impossible to produce in a commercially
    viable weaving process.

    I take your point about "day-glo" (or whatever) clothing being brighter
    than normal clothing, but the percentage of the original light given off
    again by the clothing is *very* low. On a dark night, if you are outwith
    the beam of a car headlights the clothing will be still be fairly
    unnoticable compared to even a cheapy LED light. You are far better off
    with some sort of reflective material, e.g Scotchlite. That also relies on
    being in the beam of another light source but it will make you more visible
    for a given amount of light.

    Cheers,

    Graeme
     
  4. Fred Nieman

    Fred Nieman Guest

    Graeme wrote:
    >
    > Fred Nieman <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > Graeme, I respectfully differ on both points you make.
    > >

    >
    > Fair enough (sorry to dredge up this old thread, I've not been online for a...

    <-- comments relocated to bottom for easy reading of -->

    > We had at one point been
    > discussing the "fluoro" glow from watches etc. (i.e. glows once the
    > stimulating light source is removed) and this may have been the type of
    > colouring/dye that is difficult/impossible to produce in a commercially
    > viable weaving process.


    1) Agreed. I think the distinction here is between
    - fluorescence, ("Day-Glo") where electrons in the active compounds in
    the pigments absorb UV light and jump to a higher energy state, and
    visible light is emitted when those electrons jump down to a lower
    energy state and emit a light of their own);
    and,
    - phosphorescence ("glow in the dark") where electrons in the pigments
    in effect soak up the energy of the light falling on them and then
    re-emit the stored energy later as a glow.
    (refs: year 12 physics, plus inter alia (to check the terminology)
    http://mineral.galleries.com/minerals/property/fluoresc.htm,
    http://mineral.galleries.com/minerals/property/pleochro.htm)

    2) Actually, I guess in lay terms, there are two kinds of
    "phosphorescence"
    - the "glow in the dark" effect, and then
    - stuff that glows without a prior external energy source (like
    radioisotopes, or freshly shaved anglo-celtic male legs).
    Phosphorescent fabrics? Well, there were those t-shirts around that
    changed colour depending on the heat of the bit of you they were
    touching, and I for a long time had blue shoelaces in my field hockey
    shoes that incorporated micro-balls of blueberry smelling stuff. I'm
    sure that since there's the kind of technology around today to perform
    feats that even 20 years ago might have just seemed like science fiction
    (nanotechnology, quantum computers, George W Bush as POTUS), "glow in
    the dark" phosphorescent fabrics, but there's just no demand for the
    supply. (I guess this goes a whole lot than just double for
    lycra-with-radioisotope-microthingies... but who knows whether the big
    hit of the next Summer Collections from Milan will be the new "ionising
    radiation chic"...)

    > I take your point about "day-glo" (or whatever) clothing being brighter
    > than normal clothing, but the percentage of the original light given off
    > again by the clothing is *very* low. On a dark night, if you are outwith
    > the beam of a car headlights the clothing will be still be fairly
    > unnoticable compared to even a cheapy LED light. You are far better off
    > with some sort of reflective material, e.g Scotchlite. That also relies on
    > being in the beam of another light source but it will make you more visible
    > for a given amount of light.


    3) Again, 100% agreed. Why can't I buy a (for example) Netti
    water-resistant jacket that,
    * instead of being (daytime very visible) with about 0.5 cmイ token
    Scotchlite (nighttime, looks like a dull grey, and I'd be better off
    wearing a plain white jacket)
    * is either;
    - made of a fabric with fluoro yellow and Scotchlite alternating
    stripes,
    or;
    - made of a fabric that is Scotchlite-like reflective, but dyed a fluoro
    yellow pigment?
    <curses, and shakes fist, at market forces>

    <-- relocated from top -->
    > Fair enough (sorry to dredge up this old thread, I've not been online for a
    > while). I think any problem with my previous statements probably stems from
    > the fact that the original conversation I mentioned covered about 6
    > different topics (all the best ones do).


    Umm, I was only going to mention 3 vaguely on-topic topics in this
    reply, but I'd like to make it one of the "best ones"... so here goes:
    4) why are "Bianchi" bikes traditionally a pastel blue-green (roughly R:
    129, G: 255, B: 215) when "bianchi" in Italian means "(the) white
    ones"?
    5) Philip Ruddock appears to be an intelligent and compassionate person,
    so how does he manage to sleep at night?
    6) If pneumatic tyres and the modern bicycle chain had been invented 100
    years earlier, would we all be riding bicycles instead of driving cars,
    or would we be riding motorcycles instead of driving cars?


    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Graeme


    xx

    p
     
Loading...
Loading...