El cheapo jersey



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Paul_MCMLIX

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Sep 21, 2003
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Came across a dandy alternative to expensive cycling jerseys the other day. Places that specialise in work clothes have those fluro orange or yellow polo shirts that the council and roadwork blokes wear...for about a third of the price of a cycling jersey. Also available in larger sizes for cyclists who aren't quite within the average range. No pockets in the back, but a viable option I thought.
 
K

Kingsley

Guest
On Sat, 25 Oct 2003 18:10:12 +0950, Paul_MCMLIX wrote:

> Came across a dandy alternative to expensive cycling jerseys the other day. Places that specialise
> in work clothes have those fluro orange or yellow polo shirts that the council and roadwork blokes
> wear...for about a third of the price of a cycling jersey. Also available in larger sizes for
> cyclists who aren't quite within the average range. No pockets in the back, but a viable option I
> thought.

They come in long sleeves too.

-kt
 
H

Hippy

Guest
"Paul_MCMLIX" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Came across a dandy alternative to expensive cycling jerseys the other day. Places that specialise
> in work clothes have those fluro orange or yellow polo shirts that the council and roadwork blokes
> wear...for about a third of the price of a cycling jersey. Also available in larger sizes for
> cyclists who aren't quite within the average range. No pockets in the back, but a viable option I
> thought.

The only reason I wear a jersey is for the pockets on the back! :) That and promoting my LBS.

Any time I don't require the pockets, i.e. commuting, when I carry a backpack, I wear the dreaded
"T-SHIRT". Only
1/10th of the price of an average jersey too ;-)

Yes, yes I know all about their non-wicking properties and how everyone but me seems to think they
are evil for riding in, but tough! They are cheap and work fine when pockets aren't needed. Oh, I
wear white ones.. fluoro went out with the 80's...

hippy Not a retro-grouch, just a grouch ;-)
 
K

Kingsley

Guest
On Sun, 26 Oct 2003 01:01:38 +1000, hippy wrote:

> ... fluoro went out with the 80's...

So I guess my "Choose Life" t-shirt is out too then ;)
 
J

Joel Mayes

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Paul_MCMLIX wrote:
> Came across a dandy alternative to expensive cycling jerseys the other day. Places that specialise
> in work clothes have those fluro orange or yellow polo shirts that the council and roadwork blokes
> wear...for about a third of the price of a cycling jersey. Also available in larger sizes for
> cyclists who aren't quite within the average range. No pockets in the back, but a viable option I
> thought.
>

If your in Melbourne there is a story on Sydeny road called Episode which stocks 2nd hand jerseys I
got my three from there from about $15 each.

--
| Joel Mayes | Come and see me play! Accordionist | 2traverse Musician | Sept 25 - Oct 12 @ the
| Store Room Music Teacher | cos` co tworzy jakby mapy na mojej sko`rze
 
J

John Doe

Guest
> Yes, yes I know all about their non-wicking properties and how everyone but me seems to think they
> are evil for riding in, but tough! They are cheap and work fine when pockets aren't needed. Oh, I
> wear white ones.. fluoro went out with the 80's...
>

Same. I don't care what people say about the wicking properties. Most of the time I am going to wear
a t-shirt. Although I reckon you should not worry about style when it comes to visibility. I still
wear fluoro. :)

I reckon if I wore one of those multi coloured clown wigs over my helmet then I would be seen by
most people. :). Laughing and pointing does not bother me. Getting hit does.

Pete
 
H

Hippy

Guest
"John Doe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Same. I don't care what people say about the wicking properties.
Most of
> the time I am going to wear a t-shirt. Although I reckon you should
not
> worry about style when it comes to visibility. I still wear fluoro.
:)

Oh, I look just as daggy in my crusty whites.. I just don't have any fluoro - It's jealousy on my
part, pure and simple :)

Is fluoro really more visible than pure white? What about at night or in full daylight - which
is better?

hippy
 
J

John Doe

Guest
> Is fluoro really more visible than pure white? What about at night or in full daylight - which
> is better?
>
> hippy
>

Crikey, You going to blow my false sense of security here! :)

To tell you the truth I don't really know. I would have guessed that fluoro was going to be more
visible. I mean I notice when someone has a really bright shirt but not really white. Thats just
subjective though. I am sure someone might know a little more.

Pete
 
D

Damian Harvey

Guest
hippy wrote:
>
> :)
>
> Oh, I look just as daggy in my crusty whites.. I just don't have any fluoro - It's jealousy on my
> part, pure and simple :)
>
> Is fluoro really more visible than pure white? What about at night or in full daylight - which
> is better?
>
> hippy
>
>
I'm guessing pure white would reflect a greater amount of light, but fluoro is an unnatural/uncommon
colour that gets peoples attention.
 
B

Boooma

Guest
These fluro jobbies from the safety shop are about $25-30,they are also SPF 50+ and 100% Micromesh
Polyester,I believe its the same material stuff as the real deal jerseys.

I have a few left over from my postie days,very light material,have cut the arms off one long sleeve
to make 'back' pockets for the others.

Be safe,be seen thats what I say.................

"kingsley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:p[email protected]...
> On Sat, 25 Oct 2003 18:10:12 +0950, Paul_MCMLIX wrote:
>
> > Came across a dandy alternative to expensive cycling jerseys the other day. Places that
> > specialise in work clothes have those fluro orange or yellow polo shirts that the council and
> > roadwork blokes wear...for about a third of the price of a cycling jersey. Also available in
> > larger sizes for cyclists who aren't quite within the average range. No pockets in the back, but
> > a viable option I thought.
>
> They come in long sleeves too.
>
> -kt

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Spider1977

New Member
Jul 19, 2003
446
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Originally posted by Paul_MCMLIX
Came across a dandy alternative to expensive cycling jerseys the other day. Places that specialise in work clothes have those fluro orange or yellow polo shirts that the council and roadwork blokes wear...for about a third of the price of a cycling jersey. Also available in larger sizes for cyclists who aren't quite within the average range. No pockets in the back, but a viable option I thought.

I have trouble finding a place to put the shovel
 
A

Arpit

Guest
fluoro works by converting ultra violet light into visible light (fluorescing) its MUCH more visible
in twilight and when its cloudy, compared to white stuff, because the ratio of uv to visible light
is much higher then.

On Mon, 27 Oct 2003 04:31:48 GMT, "hippy" <[email protected]> wrote:

>"John Doe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]...
>> Same. I don't care what people say about the wicking properties.
>Most of
>> the time I am going to wear a t-shirt. Although I reckon you should
>not
>> worry about style when it comes to visibility. I still wear fluoro.
>:)
>
>Oh, I look just as daggy in my crusty whites.. I just don't have any fluoro - It's jealousy on my
>part, pure and simple :)
>
>Is fluoro really more visible than pure white? What about at night or in full daylight - which
>is better?
>
>hippy
 
R

Rob Woozle

Guest
Spider1977 <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> Paul_MCMLIX wrote:
> > Came across a dandy alternative to expensive cycling jerseys the other day. Places that
> > specialise in work clothes have those fluro orange or yellow polo shirts that the council and
> > roadwork blokes wear...for about a third of the price of a cycling jersey. Also available in
> > larger sizes for cyclists who aren't quite within the average range. No pockets in the back,
> > but a viable option I thought.
>
>
>
> I have trouble finding a place to put the shovel

You are meant to lean on it ;-)

Rob
 
G

Graeme

Guest
Arpit <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

> luoro works by converting ultra violet light into visible light (fluorescing) its MUCH more
> visible in twilight and when its cloudy, compared to white stuff, because the ratio of uv to
> visible light is much higher then.
>

It sounds like much of the stuff this thread has mentioned isn't really fluoro, but "day-glow"
i.e. eye pokingly bright colours. Apparently it is incredibly difficult (impossible?) to get true
fluoro into the fibres they make the cloth from and even if they could the effective life span is
pretty short.

Don't take my word for it though, this is from discussions with a friend who runs a business making
outdoor/industrial clothing including hi-vis jackets.

Cheers,

Graeme
 

Paul_MCMLIX

New Member
Sep 21, 2003
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I stand corrected...whatever the stuff is called, I just meant 'really bright stick-out-like-dogbally stuff' that decreases the chance of you getting skittled by a semi...
 
H

Hippy

Guest
"Paul_MCMLIX" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I stand corrected...whatever the stuff is called, I just meant 'really bright
> stick-out-like-dogbally stuff' that decreases the chance of you getting skittled by a semi...

But insects are attracted to bright things...

hippy ;-)
 
F

Fred Nieman

Guest
Graeme wrote:
>
> Arpit <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
>
> > luoro works by converting ultra violet light into visible light (fluorescing) its MUCH more
> > visible in twilight and when its cloudy, compared to white stuff, because the ratio of uv to
> > visible light is much higher then.
> >
>
> It sounds like much of the stuff this thread has mentioned isn't really fluoro, but "day-glow"
> i.e. eye pokingly bright colours. Apparently it is incredibly difficult (impossible?) to get true
> fluoro into the fibres they make the cloth from and even if they could the effective life span is
> pretty short.

Graeme, I respectfully differ on both points you make.

* As far as I know, "day-glow", aka "dae-glo" (or something similar) coloured pigments are the same
as what are now called fluoro colours. They were called "day-glow" because, as arpit wrote, the
pigments picked up UV but reflected it in the visible spectrum, hence "glowed" in "daylight".
Bright pigment colour dyed clothes, like my dear old bright red wool jumper that has kept me so
on-bike warm for so many years (mostly under fluoro gear, tho) are very visible compared to more
subdued pigment colour dyed clothes like your Japara or black Levis, but they are simply not as
visible as fluoro colours. Consider a rainbow tie-dyed t-shirt v your standard fluoro yellow Netti
shower-resistent zip-up top. The Grateful Dead fan's t-shirt's pigment's yellow (whew! s'o man'y
a'postrophe's!) would reflect back the (less whatever amount that isn't reflected but absorbed,
and changed from light energy to heat, or (umm.. guessing here) entropy in the form of fading or
denaturing the pigment and/or fabric in technical formulas that we just ain't concerned with here)
R:254, G:254, B:0 and similar wavelengths of the sunlight that falls on it. The Netti top,
however, reflects back the R:254, G:254, B:0 spectrum light and similar wavelengths, PLUS the UV
converted to visible light from similar wavelengths. What I mean is, a garment dyed with bright
yellow pigments is not as visible as a garment dyed with bright yellow pigments that also take UV
light and reflect them yellow wavelength light.

* I forgot to take my yellow sunnies to lawlib today... now, how the feck does that work? How does
blocking out a whole lot of the spectrum with yellow lenses make things more visible at night or
in low light conditions? OK, so yellow lenses make things look more sunny (even tho fine day
daylight peaks on the blue end of the spectrum) on rainy days, but at night, too? What is the deal
with that?

Ahem.

I forgot to take my yellow sunnies to lawlib today, and (as I would have, anyway) took the long way
back home in growing twilight. As the sun set, I noticed that my:
- 8 years old fluoro yellow socks;
- 5 years old Netti rain-jacket; and,
- 11 years old, fabric-wise, and home-made, fluoro thermafleece jacket were fluorescing their little
hearts, if garments have hearts, out. Most of above-mentioned garments are very faded. But they
still seemed to catch the sunset UV, and do their dayglo thing. Moreover, whenever I'm wearing my
bike gear and take a / in inner city public toilets lit with UV lights (so that... well, y'all
know why there lit like that), my ancient kit nevertheless lights up like a Christmas Tree.

>
> "Paul_MCMLIX" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > I stand corrected...whatever the stuff is called, I just meant 'really bright
> > stick-out-like-dogbally stuff' that decreases the chance of you getting skittled by a semi...

I think that
>
> But insects are attracted to bright things...
>
> hippy ;-)

And to hippy: Yeep! Do you have scary moments when you walk your bike out the door to ride to work,
and all the bees in the front garden decide that you are far more interesting than the petals they
bin bzzzing at? Apparently, many flowers have UV-light-only pigmentation, because bees' vision is in
a shifted spectrum to us vertebrates. Or something.

p
 
E

Eug K

Guest
Fred Nieman <[email protected]> wrote:
> Graeme wrote:

[chopped entertaining read]

> Moreover, whenever I'm wearing my bike gear and take a / in inner city public toilets lit with UV
> lights (so that... well, y'all know why there lit like that), my ancient kit nevertheless lights
> up like a Christmas Tree.

actually, why are some public toilets lit like that? I've heard that it's so that it's harder to
shoot up, but is it really?

>
>>
>> "Paul_MCMLIX" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]...
>> > I stand corrected...whatever the stuff is called, I just meant 'really bright
>> > stick-out-like-dogbally stuff' that decreases the chance of you getting skittled by a semi...
>
> I think that
>>
>> But insects are attracted to bright things...
>>
>> hippy ;-)
>
> And to hippy: Yeep! Do you have scary moments when you walk your bike out the door to ride to
> work, and all the bees in the front garden decide that you are far more interesting than the
> petals they bin bzzzing at? Apparently, many flowers have UV-light-only pigmentation, because
> bees' vision is in a shifted spectrum to us vertebrates. Or something.
>

>
> p

--
[email protected] is a valid email address. Don't remove anything!
 
F

Fred Nieman

Guest
eug k wrote:
>
> Fred Nieman <[email protected]> wrote:
> > Graeme wrote:
>
> [chopped entertaining read]

Thanks from both of us (probably]!
>
> > Moreover, whenever I'm wearing my bike gear and take a / in inner city public toilets lit with
> > UV lights (so that... well, y'all know why there lit like that), my ancient kit nevertheless
> > lights up like a Christmas Tree.
>
> actually, why are some public toilets lit like that? I've heard that it's so that it's harder to
> shoot up, but is it really?

Yep, 's why, AFAIK. It think it got a wee flurry in the media (oops - no pun intended) a while ago.
Just means you have to draw where to hit up in biro before you go in - tho I notice some of the UV
tubes at in the loo on the west of Flinders St have been replaced with conventional ones. (I'll bet
that it was a nice idea at the time, but now it's too expensive top replace them.) Either that or
it's designed to validate us "be loud, be proud" types.
>
> >
[more interesting stuff]
 

Rod Hunter

New Member
Aug 28, 2003
9
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If your in Melbourne there is a story on Sydeny road called Episode which stocks 2nd hand jerseys I
got my three from there from about $15 each.
---------------------

I was intrigued by the reference to the 2nd hand jerseys in Syndey Rd, Brunswick, so I phoned them.

Episode is a 2nd-hand clothing store specialising in clothes from Europe and the US. The clothing range includes cycling jerseys and, to a lesser extent, jackets and sometimes shorts.
The jerseys come in Lycra, wool and acrylic. The Lycra specials start at $5. The wool $20 - $40. Epsiode hrs are 9 -6 Mon - Wed & Sat; 9 - 8 Thu, Fri; & 11 - 6 Sat.

(I have absolutely no vested interest in Episode)
 
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