Electric tire pumps?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Kovie, Feb 2, 2004.

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  1. Kovie

    Kovie Guest

    Just wondering why there don't seem to be any commercially available electric air pumps for bike
    tires. The convenience is obvious and I imagine that even with a digital pressure guage and a way to
    cutoff the air after a given pressure is reached, it shouldn't be that expensive. Given that tires
    often lose pressure between rides, this seems like a product that a lot of people would appreciate
    and be willing to buy.

    --
    Kovie [email protected]
     
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  2. Q.

    Q. Guest

    "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s52...
    > Just wondering why there don't seem to be any commercially available electric air pumps for bike
    > tires. The convenience is obvious and I
    imagine
    > that even with a digital pressure guage and a way to cutoff the air after
    a
    > given pressure is reached, it shouldn't be that expensive. Given that
    tires
    > often lose pressure between rides, this seems like a product that a lot of people would appreciate
    > and be willing to buy.

    I've seen them and have had them in the past. My friend Sheila has a very nice little one, with
    digital gauge built in (you set it for the desired amount and it stops automatically) that works
    with a 12v cigarette lighter. It was pretty cheep if I remember correctly (Wal Mart probably). It's
    something like this:

    http://tinyurl.com/2xhgy

    It seems to me that they're not advertised heavily, since they like, everywhere. This one
    seems cool ...

    http://tinyurl.com/2q2x6

    I would get one except that I got a big ol' workshop air compressor that fills my tires in about 1
    second ... and would blow them apart in about 3 seconds I'm sure (c:

    C.Q.C.
     
  3. Kovie <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Just wondering why there don't seem to be any commercially available electric air pumps for bike
    >tires. The convenience is obvious

    It is? With a decent track pump the strokes needed to top up a tyre take less long than plugging
    something in...
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> Kill the tomato!
     
  4. "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]_s52>...
    > Just wondering why there don't seem to be any commercially available electric air pumps for
    > bike tires.

    Because they're noisy at high pressure, slower than a hand pump for the volume required, and don't
    work well when you're in the middle of nowhere and get a flat.

    This being the bike industry, there's a better question in why nobody has marketed 1 pound sized
    disposable compressed gas cylinders filled with genuine Alpine air or something.
     
  5. Neil_brooks

    Neil_brooks Guest

    I already had a US$30.00 12V air compressor around the house (for filling up car tires, inflatable
    rafts, etc.). For about US$50, I bought a 12V power supply (useful for jump starting your car if
    your battery is dead) at Costco.

    The power supply plugs into standard 110V household current and provides a 12V cigarette lighter
    outlet, allowing you to plug in 12V accessories (cell phone chargers and the like). I use the
    combination for filling the bike tires. The compressor has an analog gauge. It's accurate, but not
    very finely calibrated. Once you understand what it's trying to tell you, its pretty easy to
    consistently fill your tires properly.

    One word of caution: don't try this inside for the first time until your wife is awake ;-)

    Neil

    "Kovie" wrote
    > Just wondering why there don't seem to be any commercially available electric air pumps for bike
    > tires. The convenience is obvious and I imagine that even with a digital pressure guage and a way
    > to cutoff the air after a given pressure is reached, it shouldn't be that expensive. Given that
    > tires often lose pressure between rides, this seems like a product that a lot of people would
    > appreciate and be willing to buy.
     
  6. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 2 Feb 2004 06:57:56 -0800, [email protected] (Brian
    Huntley) may have said:

    >"Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]_s52>...
    >> Just wondering why there don't seem to be any commercially available electric air pumps for
    >> bike tires.
    >
    >Because they're noisy at high pressure, slower than a hand pump for the volume required, and don't
    >work well when you're in the middle of nowhere and get a flat.

    That said, there are tons of them available inexpensively with 12VDC plugs for the typical American
    car's cigarette lighter socket. Some are not terribly noisy, many will (eventually) produce as much
    as 150 to 200psi, none in my experience are as fast as a large hand pump, and many of them have a
    fairly short service life.

    If you don't mind spending semi-serious bucks, there are 150psi compressors available which are
    *very* quiet; they are used to power dental drills, and their nose level is typically under 25db;
    some are so close to noiseless that they are difficult to hear at all.

    >This being the bike industry, there's a better question in why nobody has marketed 1 pound sized
    >disposable compressed gas cylinders filled with genuine Alpine air or something.

    A better question is why no one is marketing a custom gas with a large molecular size to minimize
    the normal leak-down speed. Of course, it would probably weigh a gram more than an equivalent volume
    of air per tire, so certain factions would never adopt it, and if there wasn't a supply of it
    available that was made in France, I doubt that it would be allowed on the Tour...

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Yes, I have a killfile. If I don't respond to something,
    it's also possible that I'm busy.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  7. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 2 Feb 2004 07:50:13 -0800, [email protected] (Neil_Brooks) may
    have said:

    >I already had a US$30.00 12V air compressor around the house (for filling up car tires, inflatable
    >rafts, etc.). For about US$50, I bought a 12V power supply (useful for jump starting your car if
    >your battery is dead) at Costco.

    Both in one name-brand package, cheaper:

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=8265

    Alternately, a cordless 145psi compressor is also available:

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=90879

    That one could be handy for a lot of people. I don't know how well it works or how long it runs on a
    charge, but Campbell-Hausfeld is a well-known name. I have one of their home shop units that's 25
    years old and still works just fine.

    >The power supply plugs into standard 110V household current and provides a 12V cigarette lighter
    >outlet, allowing you to plug in 12V accessories (cell phone chargers and the like). I use the
    >combination for filling the bike tires. The compressor has an analog gauge. It's accurate, but not
    >very finely calibrated. Once you understand what it's trying to tell you, its pretty easy to
    >consistently fill your tires properly.

    Maybe faster with a hand pump, though.

    >One word of caution: don't try this inside for the first time until your wife is awake ;-)

    I have no data on the noise level of the Coleman combo, but I would not expect it to be quiet by
    comparison to a toaster or digital clock...

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Yes, I have a killfile. If I don't respond to something,
    it's also possible that I'm busy.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  8. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Brian Huntley wrote:

    > This being the bike industry, there's a better question in why nobody has marketed 1 pound sized
    > disposable compressed gas cylinders filled with genuine Alpine air or something.

    Don't give 'em any ideas!

    Matt O.
     
  9. W K

    W K Guest

    "David Damerell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:RtE*[email protected]...
    > Kovie <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >Just wondering why there don't seem to be any commercially available electric air pumps for bike
    > >tires. The convenience is obvious
    >
    > It is? With a decent track pump the strokes needed to top up a tyre take less long than plugging
    > something in...

    Absolutely. The biggest effort is taking off the dust caps and fitting the nozzle.
     
  10. W. K. wrote:

    > "David Damerell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:RtE*[email protected]...
    >> Kovie <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> Just wondering why there don't seem to be any commercially available electric air pumps for bike
    >>> tires. The convenience is obvious
    >>
    >> It is? With a decent track pump the strokes needed to top up a tyre take less long than plugging
    >> something in...
    >
    > Absolutely. The biggest effort is taking off the dust caps and fitting the nozzle.

    I stopped using those dust caps about a year ago. It hasn't caused any problems yet. I don't bother
    with the presta retainer nut anymore (the one that holds the valve onto the rim) either, which
    makes changing a tube faster, and which isn't useful since my frame and my floor pumps both lock
    onto the valve.

    I don't see what an electric pump could do besides eliminating a minuscule amount of exercise -- it
    would basically be a version of leaf-blower syndrome.

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    Don't take life so serious, son, it ain't nohow permanent. -- Walt Kelly
     
  11. meb

    meb New Member

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    Probably more than 1g/tire-I determined a mountain bike at 60 psi could save 18 g/tire using the highly permeable He, an extra gram for H2
    .
    I suspect they wouldn't ban something that is heavier and hence slow than air just because it's less permeable and therefore more reliable. Would make even stronger sense for a portable repair or replensihment cylinder-if you already have a leak or add a patch, your seal is at least suspect.

    What large molecule gasses did you have in mind-organic halides or ethers?
    I could run some precise weight penalties.
     
  12. Richard Chan

    Richard Chan Guest

    > "Kovie" wrote
    > > Just wondering why there don't seem to be any commercially available electric air pumps for bike
    > > tires. The convenience is obvious and I imagine that even with a digital pressure guage and a
    > > way to cutoff the air after a given pressure is reached, it shouldn't be that expensive. Given
    > > that tires often lose pressure between rides, this seems like a product that a lot of people
    > > would appreciate and be willing to buy.

    I have two pumps that I bought from Target. One 12V (car) and one 120V AC. $10 normal retail, $5 on
    sale. Pumps my tubies to 130 in ~2 minutes. The built in pressure gauge is nice too. Save my energy
    for the rides.
     
  13. Richard Chan wrote:

    >> "Kovie" wrote
    >>> Just wondering why there don't seem to be any commercially available electric air pumps for bike
    >>> tires. The convenience is obvious and I imagine that even with a digital pressure guage and a
    >>> way to cutoff the air after a given pressure is reached, it shouldn't be that expensive. Given
    >>> that tires often lose pressure between rides, this seems like a product that a lot of people
    >>> would appreciate and be willing to buy.
    >
    > I have two pumps that I bought from Target. One 12V (car) and one 120V AC. $10 normal retail, $5
    > on sale. Pumps my tubies to 130 in ~2 minutes.

    That seems very slow, at least compared to a decent floor pump.

    > The built in pressure gauge is nice too. Save my energy for the rides.

    !!!!

    You should get a crew to carry you in a stretcher straight from your bed to the beginning of the
    ride. That would save much more energy. Make sure you don't do any warm-up before your ride, either
    -- it's bad for you ;)

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    Don't take life so serious, son, it ain't nohow permanent. -- Walt Kelly
     
  14. Kovie

    Kovie Guest

    I'm aware of 12V pumps designed for car tires and inflatable rafts and mattresses and such, but
    they're not designed for home bike use and tend to be slow and noisy. I guess I was asking why there
    aren't any bike-specific pumps designed for home use, and marketed as such. Some might view it as a
    useless vanity product, but the same can be said about expensive full-suspension mountain bikes
    bought by people who end up using them exclusively on paved roads, or 4WDs that never go off-road or
    see any snow or ice. For people who live alone and ride their bikes a couple of times a month, I
    suppose an electric pump is silly. But in multiple-bike households that ride nearly every day, it
    seems like a useful convenience product.

    --
    Kovie [email protected]

    "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]_s52...
    > Just wondering why there don't seem to be any commercially available electric air pumps for bike
    > tires. The convenience is obvious and I
    imagine
    > that even with a digital pressure guage and a way to cutoff the air after
    a
    > given pressure is reached, it shouldn't be that expensive. Given that
    tires
    > often lose pressure between rides, this seems like a product that a lot of people would appreciate
    > and be willing to buy.
    >
    > --
    > Kovie [email protected]
     
  15. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Mon, 02 Feb 2004 20:52:22 GMT, meb <[email protected]>
    may have said:

    >Werehatrack wrote:
    > > A better question is why no one is marketing a custom gas with a large molecular size to
    > > minimize the normal leak-down speed. Of course, it would probably weigh a gram more than an
    > > equivalent volume of air per tire, so certain factions would never adopt it, and if there
    > > wasn't a supply of it available that was made in France, I doubt that it would be allowed on
    > > the Tour...
    >
    >
    >
    >Probably more than 1g/tire-I determined a mountain bike at 60 psi could save 18 g/tire using the
    >highly permeable He, an extra gram for
    >H2 . I suspect they wouldn't ban something that is heavier and hence slow than air just because
    > it's less permeable and therefore more reliable. Would make even stronger sense for a portable
    > repair or replensihment cylinder-if you already have a leak or add a patch, your seal is at
    > least suspect.
    >
    >What large molecule gasses did you have in mind-organic halides or ethers? I could run some precise
    >weight penalties.

    I hadn't actually given it serious thought, but it would have to be nontoxic, non-ozone-depleting,
    preferably non-greenhouse, and not reactive with anything in tires or tubes. I'm not enough of a
    chemist to be able to evaluate candidates which might meet that set of requirements.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Yes, I have a killfile. If I don't respond to something,
    it's also possible that I'm busy.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  16. [email protected] wrote:

    > I'm aware of 12V pumps designed for car tires and inflatable rafts and mattresses and such, but
    > they're not designed for home bike use and tend to be slow and noisy. I guess I was asking why
    > there aren't any bike-specific pumps designed for home use, and marketed as such. Some might view
    > it as a useless vanity product,

    Yes.

    > but the same can be said about expensive full-suspension mountain bikes bought by people who end
    > up using them exclusively on paved roads,

    Yes.

    > or 4WDs that never go off-road or see any snow or ice.

    Yes. These last two examples are also stupid ideas. How does that make electric bike pumps a
    good idea?

    > For people who live alone and ride their bikes a couple of times a month, I suppose an electric
    > pump is silly.

    Yes.

    > But in multiple-bike households that ride nearly every day, it seems like a useful convenience
    > product.

    What kind of hand pumps are you folks using, anyway? Pumping up a tire is easier than climbing a
    staircase. Do you have an elevator installed in your home? I'm reminded of the woman who went hungry
    during that big power outage since her electric can opener didn't work.

    "Convenience" isn't always something to strive for -- and in the case of electric bike pumps you
    would probably barely even get that.

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    Don't take life so serious, son, it ain't nohow permanent. -- Walt Kelly
     
  17. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Mon, 02 Feb 2004 12:32:31 -0800, Benjamin Lewis <[email protected]>
    may have said:

    >Richard Chan wrote:
    >
    >> The built in pressure gauge is nice too. Save my energy for the rides.
    >
    >!!!!
    >
    >You should get a crew to carry you in a stretcher straight from your bed to the beginning of the
    >ride. That would save much more energy. Make sure you don't do any warm-up before your ride, either
    >-- it's bad for you ;)

    Why, in my day, we had to carry our bikes a mile through the swamp just to get to the dirt path to
    the general store where they had a hand-cranked compressor. One of us would have to get the flywheel
    spinning and then the other would engage the clutch and inflate the tire. By the time the bikes were
    ready to ride, we needed the wind in our faces just to cool off. You just don't find a setup that
    good at getting you warmed up anymore.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Yes, I have a killfile. If I don't respond to something,
    it's also possible that I'm busy.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  18. Colin Anderson wrote:

    > One of these compressors sunds loke just what i need so I can still keep my tyres pumped up while
    > I've got a broken shoulder. Getting the wife to pump up the tyre on the trainer bike mekes me
    > unpopular! Cheers Colin

    Do you have a floor pump? That only requires one hand. In fact, with a little ingenuity, you could
    rig it to be usable with just your feet
    (e.g. attach the bottom to something, the wall for example, and put a strap on the handle you can
    slip your foot into. Presto, you can pump your tires with no hands, lying down.)

    Why does asking for help when you need it make you unpopular?

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    Don't take life so serious, son, it ain't nohow permanent. -- Walt Kelly
     
  19. One of these compressors sunds loke just what i need so I can still keep my tyres pumped up while
    I've got a broken shoulder. Getting the wife to pump up the tyre on the trainer bike mekes me
    unpopular! Cheers Colin

    "Benjamin Lewis" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > I'm aware of 12V pumps designed for car tires and inflatable rafts and mattresses and such, but
    > > they're not designed for home bike use and tend to be slow and noisy. I guess I was asking why
    > > there aren't any bike-specific pumps designed for home use, and marketed as such. Some might
    > > view it as a useless vanity product,
    >
    > Yes.
    >
    > > but the same can be said about expensive full-suspension mountain bikes bought by people who end
    > > up using them exclusively on paved roads,
    >
    > Yes.
    >
    > > or 4WDs that never go off-road or see any snow or ice.
    >
    > Yes. These last two examples are also stupid ideas. How does that make electric bike pumps a
    > good idea?
    >
    > > For people who live alone and ride their bikes a couple of times a
    month,
    > > I suppose an electric pump is silly.
    >
    > Yes.
    >
    > > But in multiple-bike households that ride nearly every day, it seems
    like
    > > a useful convenience product.
    >
    > What kind of hand pumps are you folks using, anyway? Pumping up a tire is easier than climbing a
    > staircase. Do you have an elevator installed in your home? I'm reminded of the woman who went
    > hungry during that big power outage since her electric can opener didn't work.
    >
    > "Convenience" isn't always something to strive for -- and in the case of electric bike pumps you
    > would probably barely even get that.
    >
    > --
    > Benjamin Lewis
    >
    > Don't take life so serious, son, it ain't nohow permanent. -- Walt Kelly
     
  20. Kovie

    Kovie Guest

    My point was that people buy things even though they don't really need them and won't use them for
    their intended purposes. We could argue whether or not there is a genuine need for electric bike
    pumps, but that wasn't the point I tried to make with these examples. They were simply meant to
    demonstrate that there is often a market for certain kinds of products that goes well beyond that
    segment of the market where they're really needed. It may be vanity that mainly drives this, but
    that doesn't seem to bother the companies that make them or their shareholders. As for whether there
    is a legitimate market for such a pump, if it were well-made, quiet, fast, reliable, accurate, safe,
    relatively affordable, etc., I'd say yes. I pump my tires before each ride, and this is just one
    more pre-ride ritual I wouldn't mind making easier. No, I don't "need" such a pump, nor do most
    people "need" electric can openers, but if it makes life easier, I don't see a problem. (Just make
    sure to have manual versions handy, especially if you live off of canned tuna!)

    Other examples of bike technology most people don't really "need", but have come to appreciate,
    because they allow you to focus on riding, not maintenance, or simply make riding more enjoyable:

    STI shifting Glueless patches and Slime Quick-release levers Computers Wireless computers Easier to
    adjust helmet straps Greater gear selection CO2 cartridges Lightweight multitools

    --
    Kovie [email protected]

    "Benjamin Lewis" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > I'm aware of 12V pumps designed for car tires and inflatable rafts and mattresses and such, but
    > > they're not designed for home bike use and tend to be slow and noisy. I guess I was asking why
    > > there aren't any bike-specific pumps designed for home use, and marketed as such. Some might
    > > view it as a useless vanity product,
    >
    > Yes.
    >
    > > but the same can be said about expensive full-suspension mountain bikes bought by people who end
    > > up using them exclusively on paved roads,
    >
    > Yes.
    >
    > > or 4WDs that never go off-road or see any snow or ice.
    >
    > Yes. These last two examples are also stupid ideas. How does that make electric bike pumps a
    > good idea?
    >
    > > For people who live alone and ride their bikes a couple of times a
    month,
    > > I suppose an electric pump is silly.
    >
    > Yes.
    >
    > > But in multiple-bike households that ride nearly every day, it seems
    like
    > > a useful convenience product.
    >
    > What kind of hand pumps are you folks using, anyway? Pumping up a tire is easier than climbing a
    > staircase. Do you have an elevator installed in your home? I'm reminded of the woman who went
    > hungry during that big power outage since her electric can opener didn't work.
    >
    > "Convenience" isn't always something to strive for -- and in the case of electric bike pumps you
    > would probably barely even get that.
    >
    > --
    > Benjamin Lewis
    >
    > Don't take life so serious, son, it ain't nohow permanent. -- Walt Kelly
     
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