Electric tire pumps?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Kovie, Feb 2, 2004.

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  1. Kovie

    Kovie Guest

    Do you do a lot of riding with a broken shoulder? Sounds rather painful.

    --
    Kovie [email protected]

    "Colin Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    text.cableinet.net...
    > One of these compressors sunds loke just what i need so I can still keep
    my
    > tyres pumped up while I've got a broken shoulder. Getting the wife to pump up the tyre on the
    > trainer bike mekes me unpopular! Cheers Colin
    >
    > "Benjamin Lewis" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > [email protected] wrote:
    > >
    > > > I'm aware of 12V pumps designed for car tires and inflatable rafts and mattresses and such,
    > > > but they're not designed for home bike use and
    tend
    > > > to be slow and noisy. I guess I was asking why there aren't any bike-specific pumps designed
    > > > for home use, and marketed as such. Some might view it as a useless vanity product,
    > >
    > > Yes.
    > >
    > > > but the same can be said about expensive full-suspension mountain
    bikes
    > > > bought by people who end up using them exclusively on paved roads,
    > >
    > > Yes.
    > >
    > > > or 4WDs that never go off-road or see any snow or ice.
    > >
    > > Yes. These last two examples are also stupid ideas. How does that make electric bike pumps a
    > > good idea?
    > >
    > > > For people who live alone and ride their bikes a couple of times a
    > month,
    > > > I suppose an electric pump is silly.
    > >
    > > Yes.
    > >
    > > > But in multiple-bike households that ride nearly every day, it seems
    > like
    > > > a useful convenience product.
    > >
    > > What kind of hand pumps are you folks using, anyway? Pumping up a tire
    is
    > > easier than climbing a staircase. Do you have an elevator installed in your home? I'm
    > > reminded of the woman who went hungry during that big power outage since her electric can
    > > opener didn't work.
    > >
    > > "Convenience" isn't always something to strive for -- and in the case of electric bike pumps you
    > > would probably barely even get that.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Benjamin Lewis
    > >
    > > Don't take life so serious, son, it ain't nohow permanent. -- Walt Kelly
     


  2. Q.

    Q. Guest

    "Werehatrack" <[email protected]> wrote

    > Why, in my day, we had to carry our bikes a mile through the swamp just to get to the dirt path to
    > the general store where they had a hand-cranked compressor. One of us would have to get the
    > flywheel spinning and then the other would engage the clutch and inflate the tire. By the time the
    > bikes were ready to ride, we needed the wind in our faces just to cool off. You just don't find a
    > setup that good at getting you warmed up anymore.

    You had it easy ... in my day, bikes were cast iron with wooden rims, 7 foot tall, and didn't even
    have those cushy new fangled "pneumatic" tires (c:

    C.Q.C.
     
  3. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Mon, 2 Feb 2004 04:38:14 -0500, "Q." <LostVideos-AT-hotmail.com>
    wrote:
    >http://tinyurl.com/2xhgy http://tinyurl.com/2q2x6

    I have a couple similar (though less nice) pumps. The problem is that they don't do both types of
    valves. The solution is a Silca brass Presta chuck from Harris Cyclery; I bought two of them on
    Saturday. I'll try them and see how well they work soon.

    >I would get one except that I got a big ol' workshop air compressor that fills my tires in about 1
    >second ... and would blow them apart in about 3 seconds I'm sure (c:

    Again, the trouble is the valve; one of my new chucks is going on a hose with a quick connect
    coupler to fit my compressors.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  4. Q.

    Q. Guest

    <snip>
    > I have a couple similar (though less nice) pumps. The problem is that they don't do both types
    > of valves.

    Oh yeah ... the *other* kind (c: How does that saying go ... "the wonderful thing about standards is
    there are so many to pick from".

    I don't have a thing against Presta, except that Nashbar sent me the wrong tubes on a big Christmas
    order ... and it blew my $10 discount. I know I can send them back, but I probably wont. Well at
    least these days bikes are metric for the most part ... except the chain is still measured in inches
    (the overseas manufacturers must love that one).

    I have to agree with everyone else though ... I prefer floor pumps as well. Simpler and work better.

    C.Q.C.
     
  5. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    Kovie wrote:
    > Just wondering why there don't seem to be any commercially available electric air pumps for bike
    > tires. The convenience is obvious and I imagine that even with a digital pressure guage and a way
    > to cutoff the air after a given pressure is reached, it shouldn't be that expensive. Given that
    > tires often lose pressure between rides, this seems like a product that a lot of people would
    > appreciate and be willing to buy.
    >
    About $60 at any hardware store

    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  6. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Mon, 2 Feb 2004 19:19:59 -0500, "Q." <LostVideos-AT-hotmail.com>
    wrote:
    >You had it easy ... in my day, bikes were cast iron with wooden rims, 7 foot tall, and didn't even
    >have those cushy new fangled "pneumatic" tires (c:

    Slacker! When I was a young whippersnapper, bikes were made entirely of codfish. We had to pedal
    them by alternately blowing in the front fish or the back fish. If the scales came off, it was
    necessary to replace them with our own fingernails, which only grew on two fingers (the rest of the
    fingers having not evolved past nubs yet).
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  7. Kovie <[email protected]> wrote:
    >or ice. For people who live alone and ride their bikes a couple of times a month, I suppose an
    >electric pump is silly. But in multiple-bike households that ride nearly every day, it seems like a
    >useful convenience product.

    Not really, since it's (still) the case that the time taken actually taking strokes with a decent
    track pump (as opposed to chuck attachment, etc., which you can't avoid) is about nothing.
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> flcl?
     
  8. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s54...
    > I'm aware of 12V pumps designed for car tires and inflatable rafts and mattresses and such, but
    > they're not designed for home bike use and tend to be slow and noisy. I guess I was asking why
    > there aren't any bike-specific pumps designed for home use, and marketed as such. Some might view
    > it as a useless vanity product, but the same can be said about expensive full-suspension mountain
    > bikes bought by people who end up using them exclusively on paved roads, or 4WDs that never go off-
    > road or see any snow or ice. For people who live alone and ride their bikes a couple of times a
    > month, I suppose an electric pump is silly. But in multiple-bike households that ride nearly every
    > day, it seems like a useful convenience product.

    I have 12 bikes (4 riders) in the household and find a floor pump to be a pretty simple way to go. I
    use it to pump up the car's tires, too.
     
  9. Kovie

    Kovie Guest

    Then I guess that my brief venture into market analysis has been less than successful! ;-)

    --
    Kovie [email protected]

    "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s54...
    > "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]_s54...
    > > I'm aware of 12V pumps designed for car tires and inflatable rafts and mattresses and such, but
    > > they're not designed for home bike use and tend
    to
    > > be slow and noisy. I guess I was asking why there aren't any
    bike-specific
    > > pumps designed for home use, and marketed as such. Some might view it as
    a
    > > useless vanity product, but the same can be said about expensive full-suspension mountain bikes
    > > bought by people who end up using them exclusively on paved roads, or 4WDs that never go off-
    > > road or see any
    snow
    > > or ice. For people who live alone and ride their bikes a couple of times
    a
    > > month, I suppose an electric pump is silly. But in multiple-bike
    households
    > > that ride nearly every day, it seems like a useful convenience product.
    >
    > I have 12 bikes (4 riders) in the household and find a floor pump to be a pretty simple way to go.
    > I use it to pump up the car's tires, too.
     
  10. [email protected] wrote:

    > Then I guess that my brief venture into market analysis has been less than successful! ;-)

    Not necessarily. As you've pointed out, lots of people buy things they don't need -- you just need
    to crank out the hype. However, if it were me, I'd prefer to try to market something that I thought
    really made a difference.

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    A small, but vocal, contingent even argues that tin is superior, but they are held by most to be the
    lunatic fringe of Foil Deflector Beanie science.
     
  11. Q.

    Q. Guest

    "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s51...
    > Then I guess that my brief venture into market analysis has been less than successful! ;-)

    I suppose it depends on what you consider success ... I would consider this thread to be very
    successful. In other words, you successfully analyzed the market (c:

    C.Q.C.
     
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