Electrolyte Loading?

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by mikesaif, Aug 25, 2010.

  1. mikesaif

    mikesaif New Member

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    I'm learning stuff all the time. I thought electrolytes were just something you drank during rides, especially long and hot rides. But then a friend told me they used to give their equestrian horses electrolytes for a week prior to the event. Then I learned from another cyclist, that he loads up with electrolytes 4 days prior to important races.

    I would be interested in hearing what others do with regard to taking electrolytes and loading up prior to races.
     
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  2. Funseeker

    Funseeker New Member

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    Before you start doing innovative things like you are contemplating you would be wise to spend some time researching the subject in medical literature(electronic or paper). You should NOT rely on anything you see in an anonymous venue like this.

    Understand that abnormal electrolyte levels, either more or less, can have fatal consequences.
     
  3. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm. My wife is still angry about the time that I tried loading her up on an IV push of KCl while she slept. Jeez. She really holds a grudge about that.
     
  4. Funseeker

    Funseeker New Member

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    You obviously didn't give her enough. Or, maybe she's expressing her grudges in a more ethereal manner?
     
  5. fergie

    fergie Member

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    Indeed. What do they use for lethal injections?
     
  6. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    One of the drugs would be the aforementioned KCl. Salt's a killer...well...at least some salts are.
     
  7. TKOS

    TKOS New Member

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    I think you are best off making sure your diet is top notch and that you stay well hydrated leading up to events. Then during events make sure to keep those electrolytes topped up and the hydration as well. A lot of that will depend on what type of event you are doing and what the environment is like.
     
  8. daveryanwyoming

    daveryanwyoming Well-Known Member

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    A lot of good information here: http://www.hammernutrition.com/downloads/fuelinghandbook.pdf

    Check out the sections 'Replacement vs. Replenishment' and the chapter on electrolytes. I'm not on board with all of Hammer's recommendations and they are pushing their products but they make a lot of good points about the trouble with trying to completely replace any nutritional component during hard exercise.

    -Dave
     
  9. Funseeker

    Funseeker New Member

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    Read the Hammer Nutrition article. They do make some good points. They also make some not so wise recommendations. Mostly, they are advertising and making arguments for using their products.

    There is just no substitute for personal research and for chasing down all the supporting documentation when any particular product or regimen is promoted. Nor, is blindly following a recommendation just because it is made by a medical professional any help. History is full of medical recommendations that with later knowledge turned out to be at best costly and no benefit and at worst harmful. At the same time, for example, I can remember the time the medical community spoke against the aspirin a day regimen that is very common and useful today.

    It is time consuming to wade through all the snake oil to get a few gems. But, it is your body and no one has a greater stake in its' health than you.
     
  10. fergie

    fergie Member

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    I would still consider professional help. A Registered Dietician is the appropriate professional to see. They have the appropriate training to give the correct advice.

    Another good resource is [ame="http://www.amazon.com/Clinical-Sports-Nutrition-Louise-Burke/dp/0070277206/ref=dp_ob_title_bk"]Clinical Sports Nutrition[/ame] which offers a good mix of science based information and each section includes some excellent practical tips. It's the 2010 edition so includes the most current research on antioxidants and the 2009 AIS Supplement Guidelines.
     
  11. Funseeker

    Funseeker New Member

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    I didn't mean to imply that one shouldn't include professionals in the research. Every source of information should be examined and analyzed for its' veracity and appropriateness. Supporting references should never be ignored. It has always amazed me that hollow or downright fake references are used by otherwise reputable people because they were too lazy to check them out.

    This is my body and both from a selfish point of view and legally I am the final decision maker regarding its' care.
     
  12. fergie

    fergie Member

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    You are dead right to be cautious. There are a lot of "Nutrition Professionals" out there and a lot of well qualified people (Doctors and Exercise Physiologists) may not be the best people to listen to. Also a lot of commercial influences. The supplement market is a huge one and notable that two of the biggest players are Pepsi (Gatorade) and Coca Cola (Powerade) who fund a lot of research and sponsor various journals and seminars.

    Positive selfishness I call it. I try to develop it in all the riders I work with.
     
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