electronic shifting, does anyone care?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Dave Silva, Jan 22, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Dave Silva

    Dave Silva Guest

    Greetings,

    I'd like some input from this group on the desireability of electronic shifting. From what I've read
    Mavic Zap was nearly dead on arrival with a propritary deraileur and a very high price tag.

    There seems to be a lot of chatter on Shimano and the Italians developing a completely automatic
    transmission that keeps cadence with sensors etc but I want to know if you think serious cyclists
    would be interested in a device that just electrifies shifting (but does not automate it) by placing
    something on the chain stay that pulls cable from an existing deraileur?

    It would probably not be any lighter than the cables and shifters it replaces but it would allow for
    multiple inputs on the handlebars. That being the biggest advantage.

    I may have a solution looking for a problem and I'd like some feedback on its potential value.

    Dave Silva

    Frustrated inventor
     
    Tags:


  2. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    "dave silva" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I may have a solution looking for a problem and I'd like some feedback on its potential value.

    I'm not entirely happy with the reliability and precision of current road bike brifters, and like
    the idea of something even easier to use, so I would be a potential customer come the day that
    electronic shifters are affordable and reliable. Don't _need_ them but they might be nice.

    I take it you're aware of Campagnolo's electronic developments?

    ~PB
     
  3. Rob Campbell

    Rob Campbell Guest

    I think electronic shifting will never catch on because it turns something cheap simple and reliable
    into something much more complicated and expensive with no clear advantages. What happens if you
    forgot to change the batteries? What if you ride under some powerlines and they trigger gear shifts?
    Faulty electronics can't be fixed by 99% of people, but mechanical shifters can easily be put right
    in most cases by almost anybody. The great thing about bikes is how simple they are. This makes it
    almost impossible to make a significant improvement which will have lasting value. Why substitute a
    gear cable with expensive electronics if both can do the same job?

    Rob
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (dave
    silva) wrote:

    > Greetings,
    >
    > I'd like some input from this group on the desireability of electronic shifting. From what I've
    > read Mavic Zap was nearly dead on arrival with a propritary deraileur and a very high price tag.

    Mavic's Zap and Mektronic has such bad reputations for unreliablity that they fell to the ground
    immediately.

    > There seems to be a lot of chatter on Shimano and the Italians developing a completely automatic
    > transmission that keeps cadence with sensors etc but I want to know if you think serious cyclists
    > would be interested in a device that just electrifies shifting (but does not automate it) by
    > placing something on the chain stay that pulls cable from an existing deraileur?
    >
    > It would probably not be any lighter than the cables and shifters it replaces but it would allow
    > for multiple inputs on the handlebars. That being the biggest advantage.
    >
    > I may have a solution looking for a problem and I'd like some feedback on its potential value.

    Dave: In my opinion, you would have to demonstrate that an electronic system was faster, lighter,
    more precise, or do something clever with auto-shifting or some such that took advantage of the
    electronics.

    Multiple inputs on the bars are nice, but proper brifteurs can already be reached from the hoods and
    the drops, so generally rider access isn't a problem. Maybe some tri-geeks would like it for their
    aerobar controls.

    electrifying shifting entails replacing a very sophisticated and pretty reliable mechanical system.
    In exchange for having to add batteries to my bicycle, I'd want some serious benefits.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  5. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Dave Silva writes:

    > I'd like some input from this group on the desirability of electronic shifting. From what I've
    > read Mavic Zap was nearly dead on arrival with a proprietary derailleur and a very high price tag.

    > I may have a solution looking for a problem and I'd like some feedback on its potential value.

    The same demand that gave us STI (brake grip shifting) could bring electronic shifting to the
    bicycle but it's a difficult nut to crack considering cost, reliability both mechanical and
    electrical, and interchangeability. The desire to give it mass appeal seems to hinge on race
    worthiness (aka UCI approval) which is the biggest hurdle to overcome because shifting must be
    accomplished with no external power. Apparently UCI was willing to allow electronic control but not
    battery power for shifting. It is this mechanism that repeatedly failed.

    http://groups.google.com/groups?q=mavic+zap&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&selm=6a5ei4%24o13%40hplntx.-
    hpl.hp.com&rnum=1

    Fear of riding with only one hand on the bars got us away from downtube shifters and the inability
    to let up on power while continuing to pedal promoted synchronized, ramped sprockets. By replies to
    the subject of shifting, it seems even these devices are not enough and that pushbutton shifting at
    several locations on the handlebars is still on the wish list.

    > Frustrated inventor

    Inventor is not a good place to be. Best work for a company that produces the mechanisms that
    interest you and find satisfaction and recognition for your ideas there. Manufacturers are famous
    for ignoring inventors, no matter how clever and useful their inventions are.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  6. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "dave silva" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I'd like some input from this group on the desireability of electronic shifting. From what I've
    > read Mavic Zap was nearly dead on arrival with a propritary deraileur and a very high price tag.

    That it didn't work and self-destructed probably had more to do with it.

    > There seems to be a lot of chatter on Shimano and the Italians developing a completely automatic
    > transmission that keeps cadence with sensors etc but I want to know if you think serious cyclists
    > would be interested in a device that just electrifies shifting (but does not automate it) by
    > placing something on the chain stay that pulls cable from an existing deraileur?
    >
    > It would probably not be any lighter than the cables and shifters it replaces but it would allow
    > for multiple inputs on the handlebars. That being the biggest advantage.

    Shimano already offers this with XTR -- auxiliary shifters that go on the barends. Even though it
    works well, no one seems to have a use for it.

    > I may have a solution looking for a problem

    Yup.

    > and I'd like some feedback on its potential value.

    Utility, not much for most riders, but that doesn't mean other people won't buy it. After all,
    Shimano still offers their "Airlines" for sale.

    Matt O.
     
  7. Spam Hater

    Spam Hater Guest

    Ryan Cousineau wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (dave
    > silva) wrote:
    >
    >> Greetings,
    >>
    >> I'd like some input from this group on the desireability of electronic shifting. From what I've
    >> read Mavic Zap was nearly dead on arrival with a propritary deraileur and a very high price tag.
    >
    > Mavic's Zap and Mektronic has such bad reputations for unreliablity that they fell to the ground
    > immediately.
    >
    >> There seems to be a lot of chatter on Shimano and the Italians developing a completely automatic
    >> transmission that keeps cadence with sensors etc but I want to know if you think serious cyclists
    >> would be interested in a device that just electrifies shifting (but does not automate it) by
    >> placing something on the chain stay that pulls cable from an existing deraileur?
    >>
    >> It would probably not be any lighter than the cables and shifters it replaces but it would allow
    >> for multiple inputs on the handlebars. That being the biggest advantage.
    >>
    >> I may have a solution looking for a problem and I'd like some feedback on its potential value.
    >
    > Dave: In my opinion, you would have to demonstrate that an electronic system was faster, lighter,
    > more precise, or do something clever with auto-shifting or some such that took advantage of the
    > electronics.
    >
    > Multiple inputs on the bars are nice, but proper brifteurs can already be reached from the hoods
    > and the drops, so generally rider access isn't a problem. Maybe some tri-geeks would like it for
    > their aerobar controls.
    >
    > electrifying shifting entails replacing a very sophisticated and pretty reliable mechanical
    > system. In exchange for having to add batteries to my bicycle, I'd want some serious benefits.
    >

    In all my years as not only an cycling enthusisat, but an an engineer (HW/SW). It is amazing to me
    that something so 'simple' as a mechanically-linked shifting scheme as exists with a bicycle is not
    only still in existence, but is also still functioning better than any electronic counterparts
    thathave been developed over time.

    This says a lot for the simplicty and eleagance of the mechanism, IMHO (Ocham's Razor and all that
    stuff). I truly doubt that there will any new device that will repelace the tried and true scheme.
    There may be more gears added, but the basic design will go unchanged.

    Then again, who knows what backyard mechanic is cooking up at this moment.

    Joe Cipale
    --

    Pursuant to U.S. code,title 47, Chapter 5, Subchapter II, Section 227, and consistent with Oregon
    State Law, any and all unsolicited commercial E-mail sent to this address is subject to a consulting
    fee of $500.00 U.S. E-Mailing denotes acceptance of these terms. Consult
    <http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/47/227.html> for details.
     
  8. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Rob Campbell" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I think electronic shifting will never catch on because it turns something cheap simple and
    > reliable into something much more complicated and
    expensive
    > with no clear advantages. What happens if you forgot to change the batteries? What if you ride
    > under some powerlines and they trigger gear shifts? Faulty electronics can't be fixed by 99% of
    > people, but mechanical shifters can easily be put right in most cases by almost anybody. The
    great
    > thing about bikes is how simple they are. This makes it almost impossible
    to
    > make a significant improvement which will have lasting value. Why
    substitute
    > a gear cable with expensive electronics if both can do the same job?

    That's a well-considered paragraph that summarizes my feelings as a rider.

    As someone in the business, however, I see manic demand for dysfunctional geegaws all day long. And
    I forego some revenue by not jumping on some of those bandwagons ( such as wheels with not enough
    spokes - which are silly, but sell very well, and for serious dollars, in serious volume). You
    write, "The great thing about bikes is how simple they are". Look around on your next club ride. Not
    everyone shares our appreciation for elegance of design.

    My take on the Campagnolo project is that someone else will definitely try this again. And when they
    do, Campagnolo has to be credibly competitive in the market. I bet the sting of their late arrival
    to index is a big factor in the decision to spend developmental lire on electronic shifting.

    I'm apprehensive about the day when Campagnolo actually delivers an e-shifter (shudder).

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  9. Allen Foster

    Allen Foster Guest

    It's the same with a manual transmission in a car. I'm not sure about in the states but in the UK at
    least manual transmissions (or gears as we like to them) are far more popular than automatics yet
    the shifting system has not changed dramatically since the dawn of cars. I'm an electronics engineer
    and love electronic control systems but I also understand the concept of appropriate technology and
    that it is possible to over complicate things.

    K.I.S.S. is a good strategy to design with.

    Allen

    On Wed, 08 Jan 2003 09:54:48 -0800, spam hater <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Ryan Cousineau wrote:
    >
    >> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (dave
    >> silva) wrote:
    >>
    >>> Greetings,
    >>>
    >>> I'd like some input from this group on the desireability of electronic shifting. From what I've
    >>> read Mavic Zap was nearly dead on arrival with a propritary deraileur and a very high price tag.
    >>
    >> Mavic's Zap and Mektronic has such bad reputations for unreliablity that they fell to the ground
    >> immediately.
    >>
    >>> There seems to be a lot of chatter on Shimano and the Italians developing a completely automatic
    >>> transmission that keeps cadence with sensors etc but I want to know if you think serious
    >>> cyclists would be interested in a device that just electrifies shifting (but does not automate
    >>> it) by placing something on the chain stay that pulls cable from an existing deraileur?
    >>>
    >>> It would probably not be any lighter than the cables and shifters it replaces but it would allow
    >>> for multiple inputs on the handlebars. That being the biggest advantage.
    >>>
    >>> I may have a solution looking for a problem and I'd like some feedback on its potential value.
    >>
    >> Dave: In my opinion, you would have to demonstrate that an electronic system was faster, lighter,
    >> more precise, or do something clever with auto-shifting or some such that took advantage of the
    >> electronics.
    >>
    >> Multiple inputs on the bars are nice, but proper brifteurs can already be reached from the hoods
    >> and the drops, so generally rider access isn't a problem. Maybe some tri-geeks would like it for
    >> their aerobar controls.
    >>
    >> electrifying shifting entails replacing a very sophisticated and pretty reliable mechanical
    >> system. In exchange for having to add batteries to my bicycle, I'd want some serious benefits.
    >>
    >
    >In all my years as not only an cycling enthusisat, but an an engineer (HW/SW). It is amazing to me
    >that something so 'simple' as a mechanically-linked shifting scheme as exists with a bicycle is not
    >only still in existence, but is also still functioning better than any electronic counterparts
    >thathave been developed over time.
    >
    >This says a lot for the simplicty and eleagance of the mechanism, IMHO (Ocham's Razor and all that
    >stuff). I truly doubt that there will any new device that will repelace the tried and true scheme.
    >There may be more gears added, but the basic design will go unchanged.
    >
    >Then again, who knows what backyard mechanic is cooking up at this moment.
    >
    >Joe Cipale
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected]_THISnewtownbreda.demANDTHISon.co.uk says...
    >It's the same with a manual transmission in a car. I'm not sure about in the states but in the UK
    >at least manual transmissions (or gears as we like to them) are far more popular than automatics
    >yet the shifting system has not changed dramatically since the dawn of cars. I'm an electronics
    >engineer and love electronic control systems but I also understand the concept of appropriate
    >technology and that it is possible to over complicate things.
    >K.I.S.S. is a good strategy to design with.

    There are a limited number of cars currently available with electronic manual transmissions. That
    is, manual transmissions with an eletronic brain controlling the mechanical linkage that activates
    the clutch and changes the gears whenever you hit the up-shift or down-shift buttons. The same thing
    is done in formula 1.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  11. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    I watch the WRC on Speedvision. I WANT one of those shifter setups that they use! Then again, having
    the 300hp engine wouldn't be a bad thing either...

    Mike "Alex Rodriguez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected]_THISnewtownbreda.demANDTHISon.co.uk says...
    > >It's the same with a manual transmission in a car. I'm not sure about in the states but in the UK
    > >at least manual transmissions (or gears as we like to them) are far more popular than automatics
    > >yet the shifting system has not changed dramatically since the dawn of cars. I'm an electronics
    > >engineer and love electronic control systems but I also understand the concept of appropriate
    > >technology and that it is possible to over complicate things.
    > >K.I.S.S. is a good strategy to design with.
    >
    > There are a limited number of cars currently available with electronic manual transmissions. That
    > is, manual transmissions with an eletronic brain controlling the mechanical linkage that activates
    > the clutch and changes the gears whenever you hit the up-shift or down-shift buttons. The same
    > thing is done in formula 1.
    > -----------------
    > Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  12. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Alex Rodriguez wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected]_THISnewtownbreda.demANDTHISon.co.uk says...
    >
    >>It's the same with a manual transmission in a car. I'm not sure about in the states but in the UK
    >>at least manual transmissions (or gears as we like to them) are far more popular than automatics
    >>yet the shifting system has not changed dramatically since the dawn of cars. I'm an electronics
    >>engineer and love electronic control systems but I also understand the concept of appropriate
    >>technology and that it is possible to over complicate things.
    >>K.I.S.S. is a good strategy to design with.
    >
    >
    > There are a limited number of cars currently available with electronic manual transmissions. That
    > is, manual transmissions with an eletronic brain controlling the mechanical linkage that activates
    > the clutch and changes the gears whenever you hit the up-shift or down-shift buttons. The same
    > thing is done in formula 1.
    > -----------------
    > Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)

    Actually, when I was in High School (a long time ago), I inherited an old Renault that had motors to
    shift and passed an electric current through iron powder to form a clutch. When I had it working, it
    was kinda cool and worked well. But a plastic part broke in the mechanical part of the controller
    and I never could get it to work right again (at that time, I never bothered with manuals either :))
    -- so I switched it over to a normal clutch and shift linkage using junkyard parts. And, VW had the
    electric clutch for a while. You rested your hand on the shift lever and clutch disengaged for you
    to shift. When you took your hand off, it engaged. I drove one once in College (still a long time
    ago :)) and it seemed to work well.

    David
     
  13. On Wed, 08 Jan 2003 14:24:46 -0500 in <[email protected]>, Alex Rodriguez
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected]_THISnewtownbreda.demANDTHISon.co.uk says...
    >>It's the same with a manual transmission in a car. I'm not sure about in the states but in the UK
    >>at least manual transmissions (or gears as we like to them) are far more popular than automatics
    >>yet the shifting system has not changed dramatically since the dawn of cars. I'm an electronics
    >>engineer and love electronic control systems but I also understand the concept of appropriate
    >>technology and that it is possible to over complicate things.
    >>K.I.S.S. is a good strategy to design with.
    >
    > There are a limited number of cars currently available with electronic manual transmissions. That
    > is, manual transmissions with an eletronic brain controlling the mechanical linkage that activates
    > the clutch and changes the gears whenever you hit the up-shift or down-shift buttons. The same
    > thing is done in formula 1.

    F1 now uses fully automatic manual transmissions (nice oxymoron!). The computer does all the
    shifting. There is much derision here on automated shifting for bicycles, but there may be a
    correlation of gear selection to speed and inclination (either up or down hill). This may give
    better automated shifting than those wheel weight based systems, at additional complexity and cost.

    <Derision suit on>

    --
    William Burrow o Copyright 2002 William Burrow ~ /\ ~ ()>()
     
  14. On Wed, 08 Jan 2003 09:14:44 -0500, dave silva wrote:

    > Greetings,
    >
    > I'd like some input from this group on the desireability of electronic shifting. From what I've
    > read Mavic Zap was nearly dead on arrival with a propritary deraileur and a very high price tag.
    >

    I find it hard to understand what advantage there would be. Having a longer memory than some -- and
    older equipment, I had many years of friction shifting before I sprung for Ergo (never got the idea
    of why someone would find indexed downtube shifters useful, either). But Ergo, and I imagine STI,
    was a whole new thing. Functionally these are push-button shifting, and in my experience are
    reliable and easy to set up.

    What would electronic shifting offer on top of that?  Maybe you don't have to push the button as
    far, but that doesn't matter. It would have to be as reliable as the mechanical systems, which
    I find hard to believe would happen. Batteries, electrical contacts, wires, chips, circuit boards,
    solenoids; all these things are less able to withstand shock, mud, rain, and grease than a cable
    and ratchets.

    It seems to me like no advantage, at twice the price. So, it ought to sell well.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | "Business!" cried the Ghost. "Mankind was my business. The _`\(,_ | common welfare was my
    business; charity, mercy, forbearance, (_)/ (_) | and benevolence, were, all, my business. The
    dealings of my trade were but a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of my business!"
    --Dickens, "A Christmas Carol"
     
  15. I think it might be possible that electronic shifting could be perfected to be as good or even
    better than current mechanical shifting. I know that Campy has been working at it for awhile now and
    has invested mega bucks towards it. I wouldn't be surprized if todays consumeristic, fashion
    oriented, "techno is God" market were to gobble it up. But yuck! I find the aesthetics of it
    appalling and I hope that mechanical shifting always stays available.

    "dave silva" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Greetings,
    >
    > I'd like some input from this group on the desireability of electronic shifting. From what I've
    > read Mavic Zap was nearly dead on arrival with a propritary deraileur and a very high price tag.
    >
    > There seems to be a lot of chatter on Shimano and the Italians developing a completely automatic
    > transmission that keeps cadence with sensors etc but I want to know if you think serious cyclists
    > would be interested in a device that just electrifies shifting (but does not automate it) by
    > placing something on the chain stay that pulls cable from an existing deraileur?
    >
    > It would probably not be any lighter than the cables and shifters it replaces but it would allow
    > for multiple inputs on the handlebars. That being the biggest advantage.
    >
    > I may have a solution looking for a problem and I'd like some feedback on its potential value.
    >
    > Dave Silva
    >
    > Frustrated inventor
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (dave
    silva) wrote:
    >Greetings,
    >
    >I'd like some input from this group on the desireability of electronic shifting. From what I've
    >read Mavic Zap was nearly dead on arrival with a propritary deraileur and a very high price tag.
    >
    >There seems to be a lot of chatter on Shimano and the Italians developing a completely automatic
    >transmission that keeps cadence with sensors etc but I want to know if you think serious cyclists
    >would be interested in a device that just electrifies shifting (but does not automate it) by
    >placing something on the chain stay that pulls cable from an existing deraileur?

    All I need is a electronic shifting system running Windows... In case I bonk during a ride I can
    always say: "- I got a blue screen and could not pedal anymore..." :cool:

    Jørn Dahl-Stamnes, EDB Teamco AS e-mail: [email protected] (remove nospam first)
    web: http://spiderman.novit.no/dahls/
     
  17. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    The buttons are already part of the Ergobrain system that contains a battery and could house the
    sending unit. The brake lever would be simpler than Ergopower brifter. Stepper motors are very
    accurate. Nothing says that the motor cannot pull a cable.

    I'm sure that the marketing people could influence the lemmings to embrace an electronic system.
     
  18. Peter Vesel

    Peter Vesel Guest

    I would like to have it on my racing bike. I have wide hands with very short fingers which make it
    hard to position the ergo levers to be comfortable on the hoods, yet still be able to comfortably
    change gears and brake on the drops. (I have tried a plethora of bar shapes and all are a
    compromise)

    With electronic shifter I would only need the old style brake lever and could mount buttons anywhere
    on the bars. I could also see people with impaired hand function also benefiting as well.

    Peter

    "David L. Johnson >" <David L. Johnson <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Wed, 08 Jan 2003 09:14:44 -0500, dave silva wrote:
    >
    > > Greetings,
    > >
    > > I'd like some input from this group on the desireability of electronic shifting. From what I've
    > > read Mavic Zap was nearly dead on arrival with a propritary deraileur and a very high price tag.
    > >
    >
    > I find it hard to understand what advantage there would be. Having a longer memory than some --
    > and older equipment, I had many years of friction shifting before I sprung for Ergo (never got the
    > idea of why someone would find indexed downtube shifters useful, either). But Ergo, and I imagine
    > STI, was a whole new thing. Functionally these are push-button shifting, and in my experience are
    > reliable and easy to set up.
    >
    > What would electronic shifting offer on top of that? Maybe you don't have to push the button as
    > far, but that doesn't matter. It would have to be as reliable as the mechanical systems, which I
    > find hard to believe would happen. Batteries, electrical contacts, wires, chips, circuit boards,
    > solenoids; all these things are less able to withstand shock, mud, rain, and grease than a cable
    > and ratchets.
    >
    > It seems to me like no advantage, at twice the price. So, it ought to sell well.
    >
    > --
    >
    > David L. Johnson
    >
    > __o | "Business!" cried the Ghost. "Mankind was my business. The _`\(,_ | common welfare was my
    > business; charity, mercy, forbearance, (_)/ (_) | and benevolence, were, all, my business. The
    > dealings of my trade were but a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of my business!"
    > --Dickens, "A Christmas Carol"
     
  19. Mark Janeba

    Mark Janeba Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Dick Durbin writes:
    >>I saw Andy Hampsten riding away from Raul Alcala at the crest of a hill on his way to, if I am not
    >>mistaken, a Tour de France win.
    >
    > I think the rest of your story is as inaccurate as the name of the race. It is true that one can
    > shift standing but road races are won on strength, not tricks in shifting. That you saw Alcala
    > fall back was not a shifting problem and Andy did not win the TdF:

    My guess is that Dick was referring to a *stage* win, Hampsten's win on the Alpe d'Huez in '92.

    In digging up the date, I was reminded of something else: Both Hampsten and Alcala had been on the
    7-Eleven team at one point, I think together. By '92, the 7-Eleven team had morphed into Motorola,
    and Alcala had (I think) moved to PDM.

    --
    Mark Janeba remove antispam phrase in address to reply
     
  20. Dick Durbin

    Dick Durbin Guest

    [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > > I recall my initial reluctance to accept STI as an improvement until I saw Andy Hampsten riding
    > > away from Raul Alcala at the crest of a hill on his way to, if I am not mistaken, a Tour de
    > > France win. Hampsten had shifted and was riding away while Alcala was still fiddling with his
    > > downtube shifter.
    >
    > I think the rest of your story is as inaccurate as the name of the race. It is true that one can
    > shift standing but road races are won on strength, not tricks in shifting. That you saw Alcala
    > fall back was not a shifting problem and Andy did not win the TdF:

    I really should be more careful with my proofreading. I was referring to a stage win. My
    recollection of the stage was the Hampsten and Alcala were pretty evenly matched on the climb and
    that Alcala's delay in shifting allowed Hampsten to open up a lead that Alcala couldn't close.

    Dick Durbin
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...