eMail order, or the local bike shop?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Lester Long, Apr 2, 2003.

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  1. Lester Long

    Lester Long Guest

    I know it comes down to service, but assuming that many of us know as much of should be now, what's
    the better way to purchase a bike in the $1200-$1400 range in the NYC Metro area. Paying $200 in
    sales tax on a bicycle is kinda wrong for a bunch of reasons. I might buy my wife the bike (so long
    as she doesn't fall in love with any of you ultra-low-body fat guys), as a surprize maybe in the
    summer, so she can breaking it in in the fall when it's cooler, and it will be broken in next yet.

    Regards, Lester
    PS: I bet Steve's around here, lurking about!
     
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  2. Lester Long

    Lester Long Guest

    "Lester Long" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I know it comes down to service, but assuming that many of us know as much of should be now,
    > what's the better way to purchase a bike in the $1200-$1400 range in the NYC Metro area. Paying
    > $200 in sales tax on a bicycle is kinda wrong for a bunch of reasons. I might buy my wife the
    bike
    > (so long as she doesn't fall in love with any of you ultra-low-body fat guys), as a surprize maybe
    > in the summer, so she can breaking it in in the fall when it's cooler, and it will be broken in
    > next yet.
    >
    > Regards, Lester
    > PS: I bet Steve's around here, lurking about!

    In as roundabout a way as possible, I asked her how much she would want a bike for.....she said,
    "$1500 to $2500".....ouch!!

    Does that change the question, or affect the answer?

    Regards, Lester
     
  3. Tim Mullin

    Tim Mullin Guest

    "Lester Long" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > I know it comes down to service....

    Have you ever fitted a bicycle for someone? Unless you have considerable experience at it, stay away
    from mail order. Even if you have, but are considering a compact frame, you still might want to stay
    away from mail order. Dialing in the fit on a compact frame is very hard to do if you don't have the
    bike in hand. That $200 savings on sales tax (and don't forget you're going to pay at least $30-40
    for shipping) evaporates right fast when you start swapping out bars, stems, saddles and all that
    other stuff to get your lovely wife comfortable on her new bike.
     
  4. Cycling Joe

    Cycling Joe Guest

    I bought a $3000 kayak online and saved some big bucks on taxes.

    However, with a bike, the local bike dealer may be able to cut you a deal if you let him know you
    can get it cheaper online. My Litespeed came from a local dealer that built it up considerably
    cheaper($800 cheaper) than the advertised prices on or off the Internet.

    Also.. consider the maintenance aspect.. local bike shops can adjust new bikes better than a company
    1000 miles away. Find a small bike shop that has an owner who works on the bikes.. visit
    often..eventually you'll start getting discounts. :)

    Lester Long wrote:

    >I know it comes down to service, but assuming that many of us know as much of should be now, what's
    >the better way to purchase a bike in the $1200-$1400 range in the NYC Metro area. Paying $200 in
    >sales tax on a bicycle is kinda wrong for a bunch of reasons. I might buy my wife the bike (so long
    >as she doesn't fall in love with any of you ultra-low-body fat guys), as a surprize maybe in the
    >summer, so she can breaking it in in the fall when it's cooler, and it will be broken in next yet.
    >
    >Regards, Lester
    >PS: I bet Steve's around here, lurking about!
    >
    >
     
  5. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Lester Long" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I know it comes down to service, but assuming that many of us know as much of should be now,
    > what's the better way to purchase a bike in the $1200-$1400 range in the NYC Metro area. Paying
    > $200 in sales tax on a bicycle is kinda wrong for a bunch of reasons. I might buy my wife the
    bike
    > (so long as she doesn't fall in love with any of you ultra-low-body fat guys), as a surprize maybe
    > in the summer, so she can breaking it in in the fall when it's cooler, and it will be broken in
    > next yet.
    >
    > Regards, Lester
    > PS: I bet Steve's around here, lurking about!
    >
    I'd be willing to pay the money for the service you're about to need at the shop. Having an ex- that
    was new to cycling when we met, I can tell you that sometimes, no matter how much you know (or think
    you know) a beginner needs to hear it from "an expert."

    If you know your own size, I wouldn't hesitate to buy online. For someone that hasn't a clue, go
    with the local guys. I know that I fit a certain range of sizes, so I know that I can buy online
    without a problem if the bike falls within the sizes I can ride.

    Maybe the best bet for her first "real" bike is to find something used? That way you're not sinking
    $15-2500 into something that will possibly become a dust collector in the garage.

    Mike
     
  6. << a bike in the $1200-$1400 range in the NYC Metro area. Paying $200 in sales tax on a bicycle is
    kinda wrong for a bunch of reasons

    Sales tax there is 14%?

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  7. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    " Tim Mullin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Lester Long" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > I know it comes down to service....
    >
    > Have you ever fitted a bicycle for someone? Unless you have considerable experience at it, stay
    > away from mail order. Even if you have, but are considering a compact frame, you still might want
    > to stay away from mail order. Dialing in the fit on a compact frame is very hard to do if you
    > don't have the bike in hand. That $200 savings on sales tax (and don't forget you're going to pay
    > at least $30-40 for shipping) evaporates right fast when you start swapping out bars, stems,
    > saddles and all that other stuff to get your lovely wife comfortable on her new bike.

    You're right but that sort of gives someone the idea that they'll be measured and fitted and
    adjusted and cooed over. After reading all this stuff about fitting, the first time I went in to buy
    a good bike I was really nervous when the guy glanced at me, measured the distance between my elbow
    and wrist bone (he was damned careful about that and did it twice) and said, "Come in next Tuesday."

    Still, the bike fit me perfectly and after 12 years I haven't been able to get any better fit.

    So it's possible that you can go into the shop and some old fart will glance at you and walk off
    apparently uninterested and still you'll get the best fit possible.
     
  8. Lester Long wrote:

    > I know it comes down to service, but assuming that many of us know as much of should be now,
    > what's the better way to purchase a bike in the $1200-$1400 range in the NYC Metro area. Paying
    > $200 in sales tax on a bicycle is kinda wrong for a bunch of reasons. I might buy my wife the bike
    > (so long as she doesn't fall in love with any of you ultra-low-body fat guys), as a surprize maybe
    > in the summer, so she can breaking it in in the fall when it's cooler, and it will be broken in
    > next yet.
    >
    > Regards, Lester
    > PS: I bet Steve's around here, lurking about!

    Yes, I am! Hope I'm not repeating what's been said in the other posts--haven't read them yet,
    but I was jazzed to see you posting here. I think that unless you are prepared to do your own
    work on the bike, you're better off paying the tax and saving the shipping--especially if you
    buy (and you will) from a reputable bike shop with a good service department. The good shops
    will even service you if you come in with a bike from Nashbar or Performance, but...if your wife
    is getting a good bike (which she is in that price range), she still deserves the service,
    without having to pack things back to Ohio or North Carolina. What shop is another question. I
    think she said she takes spinning at Toga? Their forte always was road bikes. Back in the day, a
    lot of folks liked Bicycle Renaissance, which I believe is up your way (but I haven't been in
    there in years). For all around fitness, road, commuting, and touring, I still like Bicycle
    Habitat. I'm proud to call Charlie a friend--you won't go wrong there. I do mail order for
    tubes, tires, cables, wheelbuilding stuff. I get the shoes and helmets generally at the shop.

    Steve

    P.S. How do you get $200 tax on a $1400 bike, or are you exaggerating to clarify?
    P.P. To all you ultra-low-body fat guys--Lester is big, strong, and mean!!!

    Steve

    --
    Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS Brooklyn, NY 718-258-5001 http://www.dentaltwins.com
     
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