Emergency tire boot ideas

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Michael Press, Jul 6, 2004.

  1. Got my first flat today in over 5 years (don't actually remember the
    last flat I got on the road, might even be 10 years). That ends my
    streak of 10 or 15,000 miles without a flat on the road.

    I rode through some finely ground glass on a fast downhill. After
    carefully inspecting the tire, changing the tube and pumping up the
    new tube I noticed that the tire sidewall had been slashed (it closed
    up when the tube was uninflated so I didn't notice it on my
    inspection). I didn't have a tire boot, so I used a Park glueless
    patch. It held enough to get me the last 5 miles to work.

    I'll definitely buy a real tire boot tonight when I get a replacement
    tire, but I was wondering what else I could have used as an emergency
    tire boot. Today was recycling day (I was riding through a
    residential neighborhood) so I had quite an array of products from
    which to choose.

    I'm curious what creative solutions people have come up with in the
    past. I might actually need to use one of these ideas on my ride home
    tonight. This is a Continental Sport 1000 700x23c tire with about
    half its tread life left, though of course it's trash as soon as I get
    home.

    Thanks,
    Michael
     
    Tags:


  2. mark

    mark Guest

    "Michael Press" wrote ...
    >
    > I'll definitely buy a real tire boot tonight when I get a replacement
    > tire, but I was wondering what else I could have used as an emergency
    > tire boot. Today was recycling day (I was riding through a
    > residential neighborhood) so I had quite an array of products from
    > which to choose.
    >
    > I'm curious what creative solutions people have come up with in the
    > past. I might actually need to use one of these ideas on my ride home
    > tonight. This is a Continental Sport 1000 700x23c tire with about
    > half its tread life left, though of course it's trash as soon as I get
    > home.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Michael


    I carried a roll of duct tape and a few Park tire boots on my last tour. The
    Park boots took up less room, the duct tape worked a lot better (and I could
    have used it for other stuff had the need arisen).

    I've also used dollar bills, which made for a good story later on when I
    spent the dollar bills.
    --
    mark
     
  3. Ken

    Ken Guest

    Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:
    > I'm curious what creative solutions people have come up with in the
    > past. I might actually need to use one of these ideas on my ride home
    > tonight. This is a Continental Sport 1000 700x23c tire with about
    > half its tread life left, though of course it's trash as soon as I get
    > home.


    Dollar bills work well, especially when crisp. Also, mylar wrappers from
    energy bars work well (eat the bar first).
     
  4. Bill

    Bill Guest

    "Michael Press" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Got my first flat today in over 5 years (don't actually remember the
    > last flat I got on the road, might even be 10 years). That ends my
    > streak of 10 or 15,000 miles without a flat on the road.
    >
    > I rode through some finely ground glass on a fast downhill. After
    > carefully inspecting the tire, changing the tube and pumping up the
    > new tube I noticed that the tire sidewall had been slashed (it closed
    > up when the tube was uninflated so I didn't notice it on my
    > inspection). I didn't have a tire boot, so I used a Park glueless
    > patch. It held enough to get me the last 5 miles to work.
    >
    > I'll definitely buy a real tire boot tonight when I get a replacement
    > tire, but I was wondering what else I could have used as an emergency
    > tire boot. Today was recycling day (I was riding through a
    > residential neighborhood) so I had quite an array of products from
    > which to choose.
    >
    > I'm curious what creative solutions people have come up with in the
    > past. I might actually need to use one of these ideas on my ride home
    > tonight. This is a Continental Sport 1000 700x23c tire with about
    > half its tread life left, though of course it's trash as soon as I get
    > home.
    >
    > Thanks,


    Tyvek. Cut the flap off a Tyvek envelope with the adhesive still protected.
    Cut into several pieces. The adhesive helps you position it. Put on a couple
    of layers and depending on size of the cut and location it may be good for
    the balance of tread life. A Fed Ex shipping envelope will get you one no
    charge.
    Bill
    > Michael
     
  5. Tom Schmitz

    Tom Schmitz Guest

    "Michael Press" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    Snippage..
    > I'm curious what creative solutions people have come up with in the
    > past. I might actually need to use one of these ideas on my ride home
    > tonight. This is a Continental Sport 1000 700x23c tire with about
    > half its tread life left, though of course it's trash as soon as I get
    > home.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Michael


    Michael-

    A dollar bill was the old emergency standby, but with the advent of Tyvek I
    find wiser ways to spend my dollars. I use the stuff now for permanent boots
    because it's so tough - better than the conventional boots in my estimation.
    For big splits it's advisable to double or triple fold the boot.

    Tyvek seems to come in many forms - USPS envelopes, fishing/hunting
    licenses, the numbers you pin to your jersey during a ride or race, and
    gen-u-wine Tyvek scraps pilfered from a construction site.

    Some use duct tape, but I think it's overkill for most slits and splits. No
    adhesive is necessary as the pressure will hold the boot in place.

    Don't be too hasty to throw the tire away.....

    Regards,

    Tom

    p.s. - don't try using a business card for a boot ;^)......
     
  6. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    "mark" wrote: (clip) Park boots took up less room, the duct tape worked a
    lot better (clip)
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    Wrap a length of duct tape around the handlebar or bike frame somewhere.
     
  7. Weisse Luft

    Weisse Luft Guest

    Michael Press wrote:
    > Got my first flat today in over 5 years (don't actually remember the
    > last flat I got on the road, might even be 10 years). That ends my
    > streak of 10 or 15,000 miles without a flat on the road.
    > I rode through some finely ground glass on a fast downhill. After
    > carefully inspecting the tire, changing the tube and pumping up the new
    > tube I noticed that the tire sidewall had been slashed (it closed up
    > when the tube was uninflated so I didn't notice it on my inspection). I
    > didn't have a tire boot, so I used a Park glueless patch. It held enough
    > to get me the last 5 miles to work.
    > I'll definitely buy a real tire boot tonight when I get a replacement
    > tire, but I was wondering what else I could have used as an emergency
    > tire boot. Today was recycling day (I was riding through a residential
    > neighborhood) so I had quite an array of products from which to choose.
    > I'm curious what creative solutions people have come up with in the
    > past. I might actually need to use one of these ideas on my ride home
    > tonight. This is a Continental Sport 1000 700x23c tire with about half
    > its tread life left, though of course it's trash as soon as I get home.
    > Thanks, Michael




    I have improvised boots out of scrap material I found on the side of
    the road. One was some sort of rubber coated fabric, about 1/16" thick
    (1.5 mm). Another was a scrap of denim. Anything that is tough to rip
    works well.

    Tires with monir cuts can be repaired for training by using bits of old
    tire casing. Cut the beads off and buff the tread away, trimming a boot
    2-3" long (5-8 cm). Prepare the tire by buffing an area a bit larger
    than the boot.Coat mating surfaces with contact cement and carefully
    glue the parts together. Dust with talc powder and train away. I have
    repaired 1/4-3/8" (6-9 mm)cuts with great success. This works best on
    sidewall cuts since the rolling squirm tends to open tread cuts.



    --
     
  8. Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I'll definitely buy a real tire boot tonight when I get a replacement
    >tire, but I was wondering what else I could have used as an emergency
    >tire boot.
    >This is a Continental Sport 1000 700x23c tire with about
    >half its tread life left, though of course it's trash as soon as I get
    >home.


    Save a short piece of it with the beads cut off; now you have a free tire
    boot.
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> Kill the tomato!
     
  9. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Tue, 06 Jul 2004 10:32:03 -0400, Michael Press
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'll definitely buy a real tire boot tonight when I get a replacement
    >tire, but I was wondering what else I could have used as an emergency
    >tire boot. Today was recycling day (I was riding through a
    >residential neighborhood) so I had quite an array of products from
    >which to choose.


    The classic is a banknote; the paper tends to be quite a bit stronger
    than you might expect. I've seen leather, part of an old tire
    sidewall, a piece of the netting from the back of a summer-weight golf
    cap, a piece of stiff canvas, and a piece of a plastic milk jug used,
    with varying degrees of success.

    I've also seen a sidewall gash that was sewn shut and taped over with
    twill fabric tape similar to tubular base, and the tape coated with
    silicone rubber, which was still holding and functional some 8 months
    after the fact. It was on a 26" smooth-tread cruiser tire, where
    there's more room for such surgery.


    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Surrealism is a pectinated ranzel.
     
  10. Keep an extra loop or two of electrical tape at the end of your
    handlebars to keep the cork from unwrapping. When you have tire
    problems, or any other problems, just unroll some of your extra
    electrical tape and fix whatever needs fixing. I've patched several
    tire sidewalls this year using my extra electrical tape. And fixed a
    hole in the rim tape too.


    Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Got my first flat today in over 5 years (don't actually remember the
    > last flat I got on the road, might even be 10 years). That ends my
    > streak of 10 or 15,000 miles without a flat on the road.
    >
    > I rode through some finely ground glass on a fast downhill. After
    > carefully inspecting the tire, changing the tube and pumping up the
    > new tube I noticed that the tire sidewall had been slashed (it closed
    > up when the tube was uninflated so I didn't notice it on my
    > inspection). I didn't have a tire boot, so I used a Park glueless
    > patch. It held enough to get me the last 5 miles to work.
    >
    > I'll definitely buy a real tire boot tonight when I get a replacement
    > tire, but I was wondering what else I could have used as an emergency
    > tire boot. Today was recycling day (I was riding through a
    > residential neighborhood) so I had quite an array of products from
    > which to choose.
    >
    > I'm curious what creative solutions people have come up with in the
    > past. I might actually need to use one of these ideas on my ride home
    > tonight. This is a Continental Sport 1000 700x23c tire with about
    > half its tread life left, though of course it's trash as soon as I get
    > home.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Michael
     
  11. In article <fcdle0lamm4mqvjuq6754dln0uqjjp8944[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >
    >Got my first flat today in over 5 years (don't actually remember the
    >last flat I got on the road, might even be 10 years). That ends my
    >streak of 10 or 15,000 miles without a flat on the road.
    >
    >I rode through some finely ground glass on a fast downhill. After
    >carefully inspecting the tire, changing the tube and pumping up the
    >new tube I noticed that the tire sidewall had been slashed (it closed
    >up when the tube was uninflated so I didn't notice it on my
    >inspection). I didn't have a tire boot, so I used a Park glueless
    >patch. It held enough to get me the last 5 miles to work.
    >
    >I'll definitely buy a real tire boot tonight when I get a replacement
    >tire, but I was wondering what else I could have used as an emergency
    >tire boot. Today was recycling day (I was riding through a
    >residential neighborhood) so I had quite an array of products from
    >which to choose.
    >
    >I'm curious what creative solutions people have come up with in the
    >past. I might actually need to use one of these ideas on my ride home
    >tonight. This is a Continental Sport 1000 700x23c tire with about
    >half its tread life left, though of course it's trash as soon as I get
    >home.


    dollar bill. Tyvek envelope, like fedex and other carriers use. Duct
    tape. You can usually get one of these items to get you back on the road.
    ------------
    Alex
     
  12. andres muro

    andres muro Guest

    The standard boot is a folded dollar bill, because there is always
    someone who carries one, or any other bill that you want to use as
    boot. You should not use anything that stretches or flexes too much.
    Candy wrappings work well too. I have used pieces of plastic cups,
    candy wrapping, bills and pieces of folded deming or other cloth with
    great success. Once I put on a boot I'll leave it there forever. I
    sometimes tape them with duct tape and forget about them.

    Andres


    Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Got my first flat today in over 5 years (don't actually remember the
    > last flat I got on the road, might even be 10 years). That ends my
    > streak of 10 or 15,000 miles without a flat on the road.
    >
    > I rode through some finely ground glass on a fast downhill. After
    > carefully inspecting the tire, changing the tube and pumping up the
    > new tube I noticed that the tire sidewall had been slashed (it closed
    > up when the tube was uninflated so I didn't notice it on my
    > inspection). I didn't have a tire boot, so I used a Park glueless
    > patch. It held enough to get me the last 5 miles to work.
    >
    > I'll definitely buy a real tire boot tonight when I get a replacement
    > tire, but I was wondering what else I could have used as an emergency
    > tire boot. Today was recycling day (I was riding through a
    > residential neighborhood) so I had quite an array of products from
    > which to choose.
    >
    > I'm curious what creative solutions people have come up with in the
    > past. I might actually need to use one of these ideas on my ride home
    > tonight. This is a Continental Sport 1000 700x23c tire with about
    > half its tread life left, though of course it's trash as soon as I get
    > home.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Michael
     
  13. frank121

    frank121 Guest

    Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    SNIP> >> > I'll definitely buy a real tire boot tonight when I get a
    replacement tire, but I was wondering what else I could have used as an
    emergency tire boot.>>>

    I use the USPS Priority Mail envelopes that are made of Tyvek material. They
    are free, very durable, and one envelope makes more than enough boots for
    you and your fellow riders to all have one in their bike bag in case of
    emergency.

    Plus, having a USPS article on your bike may help you ride like Lance ;-)

    Frank
     
  14. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    Leo Lichtman wrote:

    > "mark" wrote: (clip) Park boots took up less room, the duct tape worked a
    > lot better (clip)
    > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    > Wrap a length of duct tape around the handlebar or bike frame somewhere.
    >
    >


    Hi, I stick a piece of duct tape and a piece of masking tape, on the
    underside of my seat bag. Just recently, I used the duct tape to boot a
    tire and a small piece of the masking tape to mark the spot, on the
    wheel. It was just for ease, to inspect a small gouge that was made to
    braking surface, when tire was destroyed. I don't know what I hit, but
    it opened up my sidewall on a Conti Force tire, with 400 miles on it.

    Life is Good!
    Jeff
     
  15. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    "frank121" wrote: (clip) Plus, having a USPS article on your bike may help
    you ride like Lance ;-)
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^
    Only if it's a Trek.
     
  16. JDTPumps

    JDTPumps Guest

    Use a piece of a Tyvek envelope. Any Post Office. Many office dumpsters, If
    yer not proud. Sometimes you'll see a piece of "non-woven" or "engineered"
    filter fabric Trade name "typar"sticking out of a fresh embankment or around
    new construction, where it's called Dupont Housewrap. Both materials almost as
    strong as the native tire carcass, very thin and light. I have used the first,
    and have known others to use the second
     
  17. Spongebob

    Spongebob Guest

    "Michael Press" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Got my first flat today in over 5 years (don't actually remember the
    > last flat I got on the road, might even be 10 years). That ends my
    > streak of 10 or 15,000 miles without a flat on the road.


    Five years without a flat tire??? You must lead a charmed life! Butfor an
    emergency boot, carry a section from a worn out lightweight tire, preferably
    a tubular, rather than a clincher tire. An emergency boot can be a folded
    dollar bill, or almost any non-stretchable material.

    Clarke--
    Clarke and Leslie Stanley
    San Luis Obispo, California
     
  18. Bruce Graham

    Bruce Graham Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    > "Michael Press" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > Got my first flat today in over 5 years (don't actually remember the
    > > last flat I got on the road, might even be 10 years). That ends my
    > > streak of 10 or 15,000 miles without a flat on the road.

    >
    > Five years without a flat tire??? You must lead a charmed life! Butfor an
    > emergency boot, carry a section from a worn out lightweight tire, preferably
    > a tubular, rather than a clincher tire. An emergency boot can be a folded
    > dollar bill, or almost any non-stretchable material.
    >

    currency makes an even better emergency boot when it is plastic like in
    Australia.
     
  19. For tire boot material-

    If you're not carrying anything with you (no powerbar wrappers, no dollar
    bills, etc), then

    #1: Handlebar tape. Just remove a section (this assumes you're on a road
    bike) from your bars.

    #2: The box the tube came in. This came in handy for me once; I had to
    ride out a flat at high speed on a twisty descent, and by the time I was
    able to stop, the sidewall was shredded in quite a few places. I probably
    tore the box up into 20 pieces in order to plug the holes enough to get
    home.

    To prepare ahead of time-

    Slap a piece of duct tape underneath your saddle. It will stay there nicely
    for a long time.

    Keep your tube in its cardboard box, in case you run into a problem where
    you need a *lot* of boot material! Just keep in mind that you can't boot a
    large area with something as insubstantial as cardboard.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  20. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Tue, 06 Jul 2004 10:32:03 -0400, Michael Press
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I was wondering what else I could have used as an emergency
    >tire boot.


    Nearly any roofing company, or roofing supplier, will have scraps of
    EPDM and/or other rubber/plastic sheet roofing materials, or "ice
    and water shield" which is an adhesive-backed rubber/asphalt sheet
    product that should work well (mostly available with sand on the
    non-adhesive side, which is no good, but the smooth ones are fine).
    I gave my .060 EPDM boot material to a rider last night who rode 35
    miles on it without any problem.

    I must remember to replace that in my patch kit.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
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