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Michael Macclan

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I found the following on rec.sport.triathlon and thought some of you would find it amusing. Anyone
care to write something in the same vein about helmet debates?

> > By the way, you bring up a good question: What is the reasoning behind
some
> > races being draft-legal and some being draft-illegal? And, relatedly,
why
> > can't there be an "industry standard?"
> >
> > Tom (not advocating anything naughty!)
> >
>
> Now there's a can of worms! You'll find that the adoption of rules which allow drafting for pro
> (and now some amateur) events has been hotly debated here.
>
> I'm one of the one who feels that drafting certainly makes for an interesting event, but veers too
> far away from the intent of triathlon, which is essentially a time trial event.
>
> That usually brings in comments about drafting being allowed in the swim and run, so why not on
> the bike. Then some people will say that the draft doesn't make as big of a difference in the
> other events. Then someone will say that they can swim 30% faster when they are drafting, which
> someone else will call a blatant lie. Then someone will say that swimmers get more benefit from
> the wet suit than they ever could from drafting. Then someone will say that wet suits should only
> be allowed when the water is under 59F. Then someone will say that clydesdales
(heavier weight athletes)
> shouldn't wear wet suits, since they're buoyant enough anyway. Then the whole "why have a
> Clydesdale division?" question comes up. Brian will then point out than Marx and Lenin were
> blatant drafters, that capitalism and the U.S. will fail due to clydesdales, and that referees
> should ride the course alone on dirt bikes, randomly firing handguns at anyone they catch
> drafting. Which bring us to the value of quality engineering in sunglasses and what that's truly
> worth...
>
> See what you've started?
 
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