Endos thus face-plants/who's done them?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by LIBERATOR, Nov 29, 2005.

  1. LIBERATOR

    LIBERATOR Guest

    How many of you have done them, to almost making it necessary to seek
    hospital attention?
     
    Tags:


  2. LeeD

    LeeD Guest

    Well, if you ride enough and push your personal limits, crash's of
    all kinds are gonna happen.
    Whether you go to E room or not depends on the severity of the
    injury, not how traumatic the crash was......
     
  3. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    "LIBERATOR" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >How many of you have done them, to almost making it necessary to seek
    >hospital attention?


    Lots o' endos - never a face plant.

    Mark "tuck and roll and/or bail out over the bars" Hickey
    Habanero Cycles
    http://www.habcycles.com
    Home of the $795 ti frame
     
  4. Ride-A-Lot

    Ride-A-Lot Guest

    (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    > Per LIBERATOR:
    >> How many of you have done them, to almost making it necessary to seek
    >> hospital attention?

    >
    > Two face plants, no hospital.
    >
    > #1) Crossed some old railroad track, was pedaling up through a sort of notch in
    > the embankment, hit some mud, front wheel washed, left side of head went *splat*
    > on the wet clay. Knocked me unconscious. When I came to, I saw this
    > pyramid-shaped outcropping a few inches from where my left temple went splat.
    > That started me wearing a helmet.
    >
    > #2) Forgot I was riding slicks, sort of jumped/slapped a curb up on to an
    > off-camber bank.... Not too bad. The myrtle growing on the bank cushioned the
    > impact a little and I think the helmet helped some too.
    >
    >
    > Three endos, no hospital.
    >
    > #1) Going down a grass bank at less than walking speed. The grass camouflaged
    > the fact that there was about a six inch rise before the concrete curb. It was
    > sort of slow motion. Banged/cut up a shin, had some blood to show the folks at
    > work (lunchtime ride).
    >
    > #2) Coming off a hiker's bridge, about 14" drop. Rolled it instead of picking
    > the front wheel up. Dunno quite what happened, but the shin burger was pretty
    > impressive.
    >
    > #3) Riding down an abandoned railroad right-of-way, came to a small downed tree
    > laying in a shallow pool of mud/rotten leaves. Walking pace, hopped over a the
    > 4" trunk, was about to cross over a 2" branch and splat.
    >
    > Interesting puncture wound just below the knee. About 1/2" wide and sort of
    > crater-like in that it didn't close up. Probably from a deadhead on the tree.
    > Sluiced it out with water from my drinking bottle, and could see a pouch around
    > it about 2" in diameter under the surrounding skin. Hosed it with Betadyne,
    > then sluiced it again with water...
    >
    > Two weeks later, it was still oozing some yellowish gunk, I went somewhere and
    > had it checked for infection and sewn up. Turns out the yellowish gunk is some
    > sort of normal bodily fluid. Geeze, I hope there isn't too much of that stuff
    > inside me...it was kind of gross.
    >
    > I'm a *really* cautious rider. Inept, clumsy, and sometimes stupid.... but
    > cautious.
    >
    > Seems to me like the potential for serious injury in MTB riding is quite high.



    Pete,

    Come on out to the Pines on Sunday and ride with us. I guarantee the
    soft pine needles will break your fall ;).

    --
    o-o-o-o Ride-A-Lot o-o-o-o
    www.schnauzers.ws
     
  5. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    Ride-A-Lot <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Come on out to the Pines on Sunday and ride with us. I guarantee the
    >soft pine needles will break your fall ;).


    I miss that - here in the desert, you fall, you bleed.

    Mark Hickey
    Habanero Cycles
    http://www.habcycles.com
    Home of the $795 ti frame
     
  6. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    Mark Hickey wrote:
    > "LIBERATOR" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>How many of you have done them, to almost making it necessary to seek
    >>hospital attention?

    >
    >
    > Lots o' endos - never a face plant.
    >
    > Mark "tuck and roll and/or bail out over the bars" Hickey


    Or swan dive over the bars as the bike rotates past vertical, fly down
    the slope about ten feet, latch onto the next thing that feels like
    ground, continue steep-slope handspring, rotate magically face-down and
    up-slope. Land completely intact, about 1 second before the bike lands.
    Breathe, get up, check extremities, collect bike, continue down the
    narrow, slightly exposed trail.

    Coolest fall I ever had, but without that big thistle hanging over the
    trail in that particular narrow spot, I don't think I'll ever be able to
    repeat it.

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall

    Conservative dictionary:
    Judicial Activist: n. A judge who tends to rule against your wishes.
     
  7. Per LIBERATOR:
    >How many of you have done them, to almost making it necessary to seek
    >hospital attention?


    Two face plants, no hospital.

    #1) Crossed some old railroad track, was pedaling up through a sort of notch in
    the embankment, hit some mud, front wheel washed, left side of head went *splat*
    on the wet clay. Knocked me unconscious. When I came to, I saw this
    pyramid-shaped outcropping a few inches from where my left temple went splat.
    That started me wearing a helmet.

    #2) Forgot I was riding slicks, sort of jumped/slapped a curb up on to an
    off-camber bank.... Not too bad. The myrtle growing on the bank cushioned the
    impact a little and I think the helmet helped some too.


    Three endos, no hospital.

    #1) Going down a grass bank at less than walking speed. The grass camouflaged
    the fact that there was about a six inch rise before the concrete curb. It was
    sort of slow motion. Banged/cut up a shin, had some blood to show the folks at
    work (lunchtime ride).

    #2) Coming off a hiker's bridge, about 14" drop. Rolled it instead of picking
    the front wheel up. Dunno quite what happened, but the shin burger was pretty
    impressive.

    #3) Riding down an abandoned railroad right-of-way, came to a small downed tree
    laying in a shallow pool of mud/rotten leaves. Walking pace, hopped over a the
    4" trunk, was about to cross over a 2" branch and splat.

    Interesting puncture wound just below the knee. About 1/2" wide and sort of
    crater-like in that it didn't close up. Probably from a deadhead on the tree.
    Sluiced it out with water from my drinking bottle, and could see a pouch around
    it about 2" in diameter under the surrounding skin. Hosed it with Betadyne,
    then sluiced it again with water...

    Two weeks later, it was still oozing some yellowish gunk, I went somewhere and
    had it checked for infection and sewn up. Turns out the yellowish gunk is some
    sort of normal bodily fluid. Geeze, I hope there isn't too much of that stuff
    inside me...it was kind of gross.

    I'm a *really* cautious rider. Inept, clumsy, and sometimes stupid.... but
    cautious.

    Seems to me like the potential for serious injury in MTB riding is quite high.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  8. "LIBERATOR" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > How many of you have done them, to almost making it necessary to seek
    > hospital attention?
    >


    Never OTB, always over the rear tire and inadvertently pulling a manual,
    tossing the bike forward. It's from when I used to do trials.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  9. Of the two that stick out for me, one was overjumping a dirt jump by a
    good way, bikes nose down for the transition but the transition has
    long since past underneath my wheels. Second was much more humorous.
    Its dusk, the light is fading, I spot a short steep slope and
    automatically hit it to get some air. When I pick myself up off the
    ground I see its a set of steps :-(.
    Steve.
     
  10. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "spademan o---[) *" <ste[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Of the two that stick out for me, one was overjumping a dirt jump by a
    > good way, bikes nose down for the transition but the transition has
    > long since past underneath my wheels. Second was much more humorous.
    > Its dusk, the light is fading, I spot a short steep slope and
    > automatically hit it to get some air. When I pick myself up off the
    > ground I see its a set of steps :-(.
    > Steve.


    Class that Steve, *pure* class, heheheheh!


    ',;~}~


    Shaun aRe
     
  11. Carla A-G

    Carla A-G Guest

    "LIBERATOR" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > How many of you have done them, to almost making it necessary to seek
    > hospital attention?


    I did a superman once over the bars at Diablo Freeride Park. It was a rocky
    section and my front wheel got jammed in between a set of rocks. I was going
    at speed so it threw me over the bars, I got a few feet up in the air before
    I landed on my chest and slid on the rocky section for a couple of feet.
    Luckily, I was wearing a full face helmet and body armor so no damage was
    done to me. The only damage done was to the jersey I was wearing, it got
    shredded.

    - CA-G

    Can-Am Girls Kick Ass!
     
  12. Shaun aRe wrote:
    > Class that Steve, *pure* class, heheheheh!

    It was a proper 'WTF just happened?' moment.
    With your track record you must have had a few faceplants, maybe some
    of them were even on the bike?
     
  13. JD

    JD Guest

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    Subject: RR:pile Driver
    Date: 17 Apr 2004 10:23:07 -0700
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    What kind of idiot puts a $10 chain on a spendy singlespeed? This
    idiot, but at least I wear a helmet for those unexpected moments that
    mountain biking brings to us all.

    So, TJ pops by the Shack on his way to the 'hood trails and I'm
    working on my Rollfast cruiser project. Of course I can't resist a
    spin, so I gather my junk and hop on the singlespeed to join him.

    We spin over to the trailhead, catching up and BSing a bit as we
    cruised over. TJ suggested a route and I agreed, so up the main jeep
    track we climbed. On the way up we saw at least four doofi riding
    down with no helmets, as well as a dude walking his bike out with a
    toasted Mavic crossmax that he had pulled a spoke out of while JRA.

    Part way up, I showed TJ a singletrack diversion for part of the jeep
    road. It's really swoopy and twice as fun as the main route,
    especially on a singlespeed. The next climb pitch is something I
    haven't climbed with a 2:1 ratio before and it was no different than
    usual. I waited for TJ at the top and as he finished pushing his pig
    bike up, I threw a verbal barb at him and we had a laugh. Karma can
    be a bitch, especially when instant.

    I sped up the next short pitch and hammered at the next sustained
    climb. There was a jogger between me and where the route narrows a
    bit, so I gunned it a little harder to safely pass her. Just after
    passing her, I heard a loud SNAP and the next nanoseconds seemed like
    an eternity. First, my legs started spinning wildly as if I no longer
    had a chain on my bike. Because I was in a slight turn when this
    happened, I veered towards the side of the trail while trying to brake
    and control the bike. I got my right foot out to try and help with
    the stop, but I was goig too fast and realized I was going over the
    side. Ditching the bike underneath me, I took a dive and while in the
    air, realized that I was going to land in some rocks that were pretty
    big. Head up, I saw one particular rock rushing towards my mug like I
    was some kind of demented smart bomb headed for a Republican Guard
    tank. Instinct took over and my chin hit my chest just as the top of
    my nugget pile drove right onto the rock. I felt my spine compress
    and heard the audible helmet-break snap then rolled straight over,
    ending up flat on my back.

    The jogger was horrified, immediately stopping and asking if I was ok.
    I was already in the self-check mode and didn't feel any numbness, so
    I answered that I was because my head broke my fall and then asked her
    if there was a chain in the trail. She said there was and brought it
    over to where my bike had ended up. I thanked her for checking on me
    and told her TJ was coming and she could continue her jog, so she
    bailed. She had the full on bird's eye view of the whole thing, I
    hope she didn't have any nightmares about it.

    TJ pulled up, thinking it was staged at first, but after seeing my
    shredded helmet knew that I had taken a good digger. He immediately
    went into Navy Corpsman mode, which I appreciated, though I knew I was
    ok. A second opinion never hurts. I put the chain back together and
    he asked if we should carry on and I told him my legs were still
    working, so off we went.

    Before we arrived at our ultimate singletrack destination, I snapped
    the chain two more times, on the same cursed link. The las tone
    happened just before the downhill, so I decided to do it as a
    chainless. TJ laughed and off we went. Singlespeed skills are
    definitely transferable to a chainless downhill, where I made it all
    of the way to the singletrack without pushing the bike.

    I had spare chain links with me and could have properly fixed the
    chain, but wanted to see just how far I could get chainless on the
    next drop-in. I did a few push-dabs in two of the flats near the top,
    but railed the rest it with no problems at all. Around the corner I
    had to do a little more pushing and then pushed up a small climb out
    of a side canyon. TJ got a first for himself at the top of that
    particular climb, cleaning a really tight turn in-between two boulders
    and did it smoothly and in style.

    At that point we decided to hit the next pavement, fix my chain and
    spin home on the blacktop. On the way back, we saw a deputy
    contacting a transient and I said hi to him calling out his name. The
    puzzled look and wave told me that he didn't recognize me, so I called
    him a freak as we headed up the street. He passed us by right near
    the entrance to our street, pulled in and was waiting for us. He
    admitted that he didn't recognize me at first, but as soon as I called
    him a freak, immediately knew it was me and laughed. Infamy can be a
    good thing.

    The moral of the story? Don't use SRAM PC-1 chains on your
    singlespeeds. After snapping that chain about six times now and
    almost breaking my neck because of it, it's getting round-filed and
    replaced by a Wipperman or KMC chain today.

    JD
     
  14. MattB

    MattB Guest

    LIBERATOR wrote:
    > How many of you have done them, to almost making it necessary to seek
    > hospital attention?
    >


    I've gone OTB more times than I've kept track of. It's usually once or
    twice a season at least, and in the early years it was sometimes several
    per ride. So that would be maybe 40 or 50 or so times. Usually it ends
    up ok. Like a vault over the bars. I think I even did one with JD and
    GDubb once on the SS but I ended up on my feet and I'm not sure if they
    saw. Every few years I take a hard one and that's one reason I had
    shoulder surgery a few years ago.

    I think I've only made face to ground contact once that I remember. It
    was on a lunch break ride when I worked at Crested Butte. I was riding
    the DH course and there was a sweeping right hand turn on a narrow trail
    with tall grass surrounding it. It was pretty steep and I just tried
    to carve it. Unknown to me, the trail surface was all baseball to
    softball sized rocks. So when I came into the rocks with my weight over
    my front wheel (to carve it) my bike just seemed to disappear under me.
    It happened vary fast and I scraped my chin (as well as my forearms and
    chest). It wasn't too bad, but it looked nasty. I had a meeting
    immediately afterwards and my chin was doing that oozy road rash thing.
    Every time anyone talked to me I could see them trying not to look at
    the wound, but their eyes were always drawn to it.

    Matt
     
  15. (PeteCresswell) wrote:

    > Which begs the question: When driving a car, has anybody found themselves in a
    > standstill traffic jam that they would get out of by just hopping that 18" curb
    > over there....? I've found myself pulling back on the steering wheel before
    > coming to the realization....
    > --


    Not quite that extreme, but when driving over speed bumps I have a
    tendancy to try to accelerate as the front wheels go over to manual
    them. In a car. D'oh!
     
  16. Shawn

    Shawn Guest

    LIBERATOR wrote:
    > How many of you have done them, to almost making it necessary to seek
    > hospital attention?
    >

    Nasty OTB a dozen years ago resulted in a very torn up shoulder and two
    months of PT. My broken helmet SAVED MY LIFE!!!!!!!
    ;-)
    Twice that many years ago, on a road bike-I'd seen one MTB at that
    point, I was with a group ride. We approached a stop sign and one of
    Colorado Springs' finest, sitting in a patrol car, was able to pull his
    attention away from his donut long enough to notice us and announce on
    his car PA system "Please stop at the stop sign." (at least he said
    please). Having a mouth full of donut, he wasn't that clear, so I
    looked around to see where that speech-like noise was coming from. My
    team mate Lance (no not that Lance) was riding just ahead of me.
    Comprehending donut-speak better than I, he slowed down. Figuring out
    what the cop said I turned around just as my front tire hit Lance's
    derailleur. I launched, somehow missed Lance, came straight down,
    tucked, rolled, and came up on my feet skittering to a stop on my
    plastic soled road shoes. Wish I had done the same in the above wreck.
    IIRC the only damage was a bent derailleur hanger on my bike (before
    index shifting, so it was barely noticeable) and a bruised heel. The
    cop ignored the whole thing, I like to think it was because he was so
    surprised at seeing a flying cyclist he spilled burning hot coffee in
    his crotch.
    Those are just two memorable ones of many.

    Shawn
     
  17. Shawn

    Shawn Guest

    spademan o---[) * wrote:
    > (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Which begs the question: When driving a car, has anybody found themselves in a
    >>standstill traffic jam that they would get out of by just hopping that 18" curb
    >>over there....? I've found myself pulling back on the steering wheel before
    >>coming to the realization....
    >>--

    >
    >
    > Not quite that extreme, but when driving over speed bumps I have a
    > tendancy to try to accelerate as the front wheels go over to manual
    > them. In a car. D'oh!
    >

    When I first started riding a motorcycle I would catch myself setting up
    to bunny hop railroad tracks.

    Shawn
     
  18. G.T.

    G.T. Guest

    Shawn wrote:
    > LIBERATOR wrote:
    >
    >> How many of you have done them, to almost making it necessary to seek
    >> hospital attention?
    >>

    > Nasty OTB a dozen years ago resulted in a very torn up shoulder and two
    > months of PT. My broken helmet SAVED MY LIFE!!!!!!!
    > ;-)
    > Twice that many years ago, on a road bike-I'd seen one MTB at that
    > point, I was with a group ride.


    My best OTB was on a road bike also, circa 1983 on my 1971 Sears Free
    Spirit. I was on my usual route through Santa Clarita, just cruising
    through a residential neighborhood, when passing by a car which a
    mid-size dog was sleeping under the dog decided to wake up and chase a
    car on the opposite side of the street, the dog was oblivious to my
    front wheel which he promptly ran into sending me directly over the
    bars. If I had been wearing my gloves they probably would have saved me
    from the deep gouges on the heels of my palms. But, alas, I was unlucky
    enough to be hit by a dog on the one day I forgot to wear them. I have
    forgotten my helmet since then but never my gloves.

    Greg
     
  19. Carla A-G

    Carla A-G Guest

    "(PeteCresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Per spademan o---[) *:
    > >I spot a short steep slope and
    > >automatically hit it to get some air.

    >
    > Which begs the question: When driving a car, has anybody found themselves

    in a
    > standstill traffic jam that they would get out of by just hopping that 18"

    curb
    > over there....? I've found myself pulling back on the steering wheel

    before
    > coming to the realization....
    > --
    > PeteCresswell


    If I did that with my car (sports car), I would probably wreck the front end
    going over the curb.

    - CA-G

    Can-Am Girls Kick Ass!
     
  20. Per spademan o---[) *:
    >I spot a short steep slope and
    >automatically hit it to get some air.


    Which begs the question: When driving a car, has anybody found themselves in a
    standstill traffic jam that they would get out of by just hopping that 18" curb
    over there....? I've found myself pulling back on the steering wheel before
    coming to the realization....
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
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