Engineering types... check my work!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Phil, Squid-in-Training, Jan 13, 2005.

  1. I did a time trial with my college team this past weekend. The location is
    11 miles away, and during the ride there, I got 2 flats! I managed to get
    enough air in the two wheels, and managed to get there in time to do the TT
    before everyone left. I ran a 20:19 for the 7-mile course, which was a lot
    better than the 22:00 I had gotten the last time I tried it. It wasn't
    until I got home and discovered that my tires were only inflated to 30F/35R
    that I realized I could have broken 20 minutes. Oh well.

    So I pumped up the tires to 120 later that night, and within a few minutes,
    psssssssss. The 3-mm slit the glass made in the tire tread was too big for
    the tube. So I cut out some water bottle and used duct tape for a boot.
    Works well.

    Today in class I was mulling over whether I should repair it, not because
    I'm worried about the tire failing in the future, but whether I could
    actually sew the casing back together. Then I thought about the kind of
    tension the thread would be under if I sewed it. I remembered that I have
    some Kevlar thread from a digital camera fix a year ago, and it was rated at
    25lbs. I did some calculations here:

    http://plaza.ufl.edu/phillee/tireslit.jpg

    and determined that I would need one thread to hold at least 14.5 lbs to
    keep the tire closed, given a 3mm slit parallel to the direction of travel
    in the center of the tread of a 23mm road tire at 120psi.

    Ignoring gross uncertainties such as actual tire size, the fact that the
    slit isn't so much parallel as diagonal to the tread, am I anywhere near a
    correct answer?

    Ignore the secant and bisection methods in the picture... that was class
    notes. The FBD in the bottom right of the pic is the pressure distribution
    perpendicular to the tread. I wasn't sure how to calculate it though.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
    Tags:


  2. zulutime

    zulutime Guest

    Search "hoop stress".
     
  3. "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote
    in message news:[email protected]
    >
    > So I pumped up the tires to 120 later that night, and within a few
    > minutes, psssssssss. The 3-mm slit the glass made in the tire tread
    > was too big for the tube. So I cut out some water bottle and used
    > duct tape for a boot. Works well.


    tension from hoop stress is pr (lb/inch)
    for a 7/8 inch wide tire at 120 psi this will be 120 x .44 = 53 lb/inch
    for a 1/8 (3 mm) width the tension is 53/8 = ~ 7 lb

    Phil H
     
  4. Mark Janeba

    Mark Janeba Guest

    Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:

    > I did a time trial with my college team this past weekend. The location is
    > 11 miles away, and during the ride there, I got 2 flats! I managed to get
    > enough air in the two wheels, and managed to get there in time to do the TT
    > before everyone left. I ran a 20:19 for the 7-mile course, which was a lot
    > better than the 22:00 I had gotten the last time I tried it. It wasn't
    > until I got home and discovered that my tires were only inflated to 30F/35R
    > that I realized I could have broken 20 minutes. Oh well.
    >
    > So I pumped up the tires to 120 later that night, and within a few minutes,
    > psssssssss. The 3-mm slit the glass made in the tire tread was too big for
    > the tube. So I cut out some water bottle and used duct tape for a boot.
    > Works well.
    >
    > Today in class I was mulling over whether I should repair it, not because
    > I'm worried about the tire failing in the future, but whether I could
    > actually sew the casing back together. Then I thought about the kind of
    > tension the thread would be under if I sewed it. I remembered that I have
    > some Kevlar thread from a digital camera fix a year ago, and it was rated at
    > 25lbs. I did some calculations here:
    >
    > http://plaza.ufl.edu/phillee/tireslit.jpg
    >
    > and determined that I would need one thread to hold at least 14.5 lbs to
    > keep the tire closed, given a 3mm slit parallel to the direction of travel
    > in the center of the tread of a 23mm road tire at 120psi.
    >
    > Ignoring gross uncertainties such as actual tire size, the fact that the
    > slit isn't so much parallel as diagonal to the tread, am I anywhere near a
    > correct answer?


    Can't help you with the thread tension, but put in several stitches with
    anything as strong as dental floss or stronger, and the threads won't
    break. The bigger concern is whether they will pull out of the casing
    cord. Make sure to engage several cords on both sides of the cut with
    each stitch.

    If you're using ultralight tubes, stick an inner tube patch over the
    stitches to avoid abrading the tube (not sure if this is necessary, but
    it won't hurt).

    Have fun with your thread tension calculation.

    Mark Janeba
     
  5. Boyle M. Owl

    Boyle M. Owl Guest

    Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:

    > So I pumped up the tires to 120 later that night, and within a few minutes,
    > psssssssss. The 3-mm slit the glass made in the tire tread was too big for
    > the tube. So I cut out some water bottle and used duct tape for a boot.
    > Works well.


    It should. The thickness of a PET strip from a bottle is overkill.

    What I thought about a while ago would be strips of Kapton with a really
    good adhesive to glue into the inside of the tire. Kapton is a
    lightweight, high strength plastic. It's expensive if you buy a pound
    of it (waaay back in 1985 it cost $75/pound) but if you only have a few
    strips of 2 or 5 mil Kapton, plus adhesive, it shouldn't be terribly
    expensive.

    Sewing up the slit in the tire should be belt-and-suspenders. Use silk
    thread, maybe. It's really strong.

    --
    BMO
     
  6. "Boyle M. Owl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
    >
    >> So I pumped up the tires to 120 later that night, and within a few
    >> minutes, psssssssss. The 3-mm slit the glass made in the tire tread was
    >> too big for the tube. So I cut out some water bottle and used duct tape
    >> for a boot. Works well.

    >
    > It should. The thickness of a PET strip from a bottle is overkill.
    >
    > What I thought about a while ago would be strips of Kapton with a really
    > good adhesive to glue into the inside of the tire. Kapton is a
    > lightweight, high strength plastic. It's expensive if you buy a pound of
    > it (waaay back in 1985 it cost $75/pound) but if you only have a few
    > strips of 2 or 5 mil Kapton, plus adhesive, it shouldn't be terribly
    > expensive.
    >
    > Sewing up the slit in the tire should be belt-and-suspenders. Use silk
    > thread, maybe. It's really strong.


    I used one of the really cheap house-brand plastic bottles that are much
    thinner than bottles from Dasani, Zephyrhills, etc.

    I've split open a Park tire boot before... I didn't want to take any
    chances.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  7. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 01:36:04 GMT, "Phil, Squid-in-Training"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Ignoring gross uncertainties such as actual tire size, the fact that the
    >slit isn't so much parallel as diagonal to the tread, am I anywhere near a
    >correct answer?


    I can't say, but here's something to consider...

    Some of the tubeless tire makers are recommending a variety of
    cyanoacrylate adhesive as the repair method for punctures in their
    products. By extrapolation, using the adhesive might be a reasonable
    addition to the stitching. I have seen a couple of small cuts
    stitched up in tires that were either expensive or hard to get under
    the circumstances, with mixed results. The thread gets worn off on
    the outside if the sewn area is in the tread region, breaking the
    stitches in the process; the adhesive might help to keep the repair
    together.

    I suspect that while it may be possible to repair the tire well enough
    to get it to work for some period of time, the chances are good that
    any repair will fall short of an undamaged tire's durability. It's
    just something to keep in mind when balancing effort versus cost and
    results.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  8. "Werehatrack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 01:36:04 GMT, "Phil, Squid-in-Training"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Ignoring gross uncertainties such as actual tire size, the fact that the
    >>slit isn't so much parallel as diagonal to the tread, am I anywhere near a
    >>correct answer?

    >
    > I can't say, but here's something to consider...
    >
    > Some of the tubeless tire makers are recommending a variety of
    > cyanoacrylate adhesive as the repair method for punctures in their
    > products. By extrapolation, using the adhesive might be a reasonable
    > addition to the stitching. I have seen a couple of small cuts
    > stitched up in tires that were either expensive or hard to get under
    > the circumstances, with mixed results. The thread gets worn off on
    > the outside if the sewn area is in the tread region, breaking the
    > stitches in the process; the adhesive might help to keep the repair
    > together.


    I thought CA was extremely brittle and would fracture under stress.

    > I suspect that while it may be possible to repair the tire well enough
    > to get it to work for some period of time, the chances are good that
    > any repair will fall short of an undamaged tire's durability. It's
    > just something to keep in mind when balancing effort versus cost and
    > results.
    > --
    > Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    > Some gardening required to reply via email.
    > Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  9. > I suspect that while it may be possible to repair the tire well enough
    > to get it to work for some period of time, the chances are good that
    > any repair will fall short of an undamaged tire's durability. It's
    > just something to keep in mind when balancing effort versus cost and
    > results.


    Sent post off too early:

    This bike is my road racing bike and commuter bike. Old GT Edge with old
    105 group. Handbuilt ME14A with spokes from a customer's tacoed wheel.
    Cost me $250.

    So yes, it's worth the effort ;)

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  10. Bill Sornson

    Bill Sornson Guest

    Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:

    > I thought CA was extremely brittle and would fracture under stress.


    Yeah, but the weather's hard to beat.
     
  11. On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 15:35:23 GMT, "Phil, Squid-in-Training"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Werehatrack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 01:36:04 GMT, "Phil, Squid-in-Training"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Ignoring gross uncertainties such as actual tire size, the fact that the
    >>>slit isn't so much parallel as diagonal to the tread, am I anywhere near a
    >>>correct answer?

    >>
    >> I can't say, but here's something to consider...
    >>
    >> Some of the tubeless tire makers are recommending a variety of
    >> cyanoacrylate adhesive as the repair method for punctures in their
    >> products. By extrapolation, using the adhesive might be a reasonable
    >> addition to the stitching. I have seen a couple of small cuts
    >> stitched up in tires that were either expensive or hard to get under
    >> the circumstances, with mixed results. The thread gets worn off on
    >> the outside if the sewn area is in the tread region, breaking the
    >> stitches in the process; the adhesive might help to keep the repair
    >> together.

    >
    >I thought CA was extremely brittle and would fracture under stress.
    >
    >> I suspect that while it may be possible to repair the tire well enough
    >> to get it to work for some period of time, the chances are good that
    >> any repair will fall short of an undamaged tire's durability. It's
    >> just something to keep in mind when balancing effort versus cost and
    >> results.
    >> --
    >> Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    >> Some gardening required to reply via email.
    >> Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.


    Dear Phil,

    Hmmm . . . the most common form of cyanoacrylate is super
    glue.

    Super glue can be used to stick fingers together--or even
    the lips of wounds, though a medical version that reduces
    all sorts of side effects is preferable.

    You need a solvent to get your glued fingers apart--you
    can't just roll them back and forth and crack the thin bond
    between them.

    So while it may sound brittle, I suspect that it's tougher
    than we might think at first. The usual description is that
    it "dries to a hard, tough adhesive"--we tend to think of
    hard as brittle, but it's actually "tough" in this case.

    Carl Fogel
     
  12. Mark Janeba

    Mark Janeba Guest

    Werehatrack wrote:
    > I have seen a couple of small cuts
    > stitched up in tires that were either expensive or hard to get under
    > the circumstances, with mixed results. The thread gets worn off on
    > the outside if the sewn area is in the tread region, breaking the
    > stitches in the process;


    The trick is to push the needle between the casing and the tread - that
    is, sewing from inside the casing, push the needle deep enough to get
    near the tread but not far enough to be exposed on the outside of the tire.

    This is easier said than done, but with a little practice it's do-able.
    Waxing your needle and using a thimble to push the needle and pliers
    to pull it can make the job a little less difficult.

    On sidewall cuts, it's much easier as exposed stiches won't hurt.

    Mark Janeba
     
  13. Boyle M. Owl

    Boyle M. Owl Guest

    Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:

    > I thought CA was extremely brittle and would fracture under stress.


    Not really, not if you've ever glued your fingertips together. The more
    stress you're under, the longer it takes for the acetone to dissolve the
    superglue.

    *rimshot* I'm here all night. Try the veal. Thank you.

    CA is not resistant to *shock*, however. Glue two pieces of steel
    together with cyanoacrylate and you'll have a tough time pulling them
    apart, but a tap with a 1oz hammer will separate them instantly with the
    totality of glue on one of the pieces and none on the other.

    Here's an interesting bit about cyanoacrylate (superglues):

    If you have ever read the MSDS sheet, you'll notice that surgery is an
    absolute LAST resort for an eye glued shut. Indeed, the instructions
    are to put a patch over the affected eye and let MomNature do her bit by
    sloughing off protiens from the cornea.

    --
    BMO - Brittle under stress.
     
  14. Phil, Squid-in-Training <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I did a time trial with my college team this past weekend. The location is
    >11 miles away, and during the ride there, I got 2 flats! I managed to get
    >enough air in the two wheels, and managed to get there in time to do the TT
    >before everyone left. I ran a 20:19 for the 7-mile course, which was a lot
    >better than the 22:00 I had gotten the last time I tried it. It wasn't
    >until I got home and discovered that my tires were only inflated to 30F/35R
    >that I realized I could have broken 20 minutes. Oh well.


    How did you place in that TT? And where's that school?

    Because 20:19 over 7 miles is ~20.7 mph.

    --Blair
    "Maybe I could matriculate and start
    stacking up the bling."
     
  15. "Blair P. Houghton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>I did a time trial with my college team this past weekend. The location
    >>is
    >>11 miles away, and during the ride there, I got 2 flats! I managed to get
    >>enough air in the two wheels, and managed to get there in time to do the
    >>TT
    >>before everyone left. I ran a 20:19 for the 7-mile course, which was a
    >>lot
    >>better than the 22:00 I had gotten the last time I tried it. It wasn't
    >>until I got home and discovered that my tires were only inflated to
    >>30F/35R
    >>that I realized I could have broken 20 minutes. Oh well.

    >
    > How did you place in that TT? And where's that school?


    I placed 16th out of 20. Here were the results:

    Name Sex 1/8/05 Average Fastest
    1. M 16:12 15:55 14:59
    2. M 16:13 17:30 16:13
    3. F 17:05 17:30 16:40
    4. M 17:20 17:20 17:20
    5. M 17:28 17:15 15:51
    6. M 17:40 17:52 17:40
    7. M 17:41 17:57 17:29
    8. M 18:10 19:15 18:10
    9. M 18:24 18:24 18:24
    10. M 18:27 18:27 18:27
    11. M 18:28 18:54 18:04
    12. M 18:40 18:40 18:40
    13. M 18:43 19:20 18:43
    14. M 19:03 19:15 19:03
    15. M 19:50 20:02 19:50
    16. M 20:19 21:07 20:19
    17. M 20:20 20:49 20:20
    18. M 20:52 21:54 20:52
    19. M 21:40 22:30 21:40
    20. M 22:02 22:12 21:04

    The fastest ever solo time (the team coach) was 14:59, and the fastest ever
    group time is a min or two faster.

    > Because 20:19 over 7 miles is ~20.7 mph.


    I'm not sure if you mean that's slow or fast. It's definitely slow amongst
    us Team Florida Cycling (University of Florida) members. I'm an
    urban/mountain biker anyways and riding road is fun sometimes.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  16. "Blair P. Houghton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>I did a time trial with my college team this past weekend. The location
    >>is
    >>11 miles away, and during the ride there, I got 2 flats! I managed to get
    >>enough air in the two wheels, and managed to get there in time to do the
    >>TT
    >>before everyone left. I ran a 20:19 for the 7-mile course, which was a
    >>lot
    >>better than the 22:00 I had gotten the last time I tried it. It wasn't
    >>until I got home and discovered that my tires were only inflated to
    >>30F/35R
    >>that I realized I could have broken 20 minutes. Oh well.

    >
    > How did you place in that TT? And where's that school?


    I placed 16th out of 20. Here were the results:

    Name Sex 1/8/05 Average Fastest
    1. M 16:12 15:55 14:59
    2. M 16:13 17:30 16:13
    3. F 17:05 17:30 16:40
    4. M 17:20 17:20 17:20
    5. M 17:28 17:15 15:51
    6. M 17:40 17:52 17:40
    7. M 17:41 17:57 17:29
    8. M 18:10 19:15 18:10
    9. M 18:24 18:24 18:24
    10. M 18:27 18:27 18:27
    11. M 18:28 18:54 18:04
    12. M 18:40 18:40 18:40
    13. M 18:43 19:20 18:43
    14. M 19:03 19:15 19:03
    15. M 19:50 20:02 19:50
    16. M 20:19 21:07 20:19
    17. M 20:20 20:49 20:20
    18. M 20:52 21:54 20:52
    19. M 21:40 22:30 21:40
    20. M 22:02 22:12 21:04

    The fastest ever solo time (the team coach) was 14:59, and the fastest ever
    group time is a min or two faster.

    > Because 20:19 over 7 miles is ~20.7 mph.


    I'm not sure if you mean that's slow or fast. It's definitely slow amongst
    us Team Florida Cycling (University of Florida) members. I'm an
    urban/mountain biker anyways and riding road is fun sometimes.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  17. "Blair P. Houghton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>I did a time trial with my college team this past weekend. The location
    >>is
    >>11 miles away, and during the ride there, I got 2 flats! I managed to get
    >>enough air in the two wheels, and managed to get there in time to do the
    >>TT
    >>before everyone left. I ran a 20:19 for the 7-mile course, which was a
    >>lot
    >>better than the 22:00 I had gotten the last time I tried it. It wasn't
    >>until I got home and discovered that my tires were only inflated to
    >>30F/35R
    >>that I realized I could have broken 20 minutes. Oh well.

    >
    > How did you place in that TT? And where's that school?


    I placed 16th out of 20. Here were the results:

    Name Sex 1/8/05 Average Fastest
    1. M 16:12 15:55 14:59
    2. M 16:13 17:30 16:13
    3. F 17:05 17:30 16:40
    4. M 17:20 17:20 17:20
    5. M 17:28 17:15 15:51
    6. M 17:40 17:52 17:40
    7. M 17:41 17:57 17:29
    8. M 18:10 19:15 18:10
    9. M 18:24 18:24 18:24
    10. M 18:27 18:27 18:27
    11. M 18:28 18:54 18:04
    12. M 18:40 18:40 18:40
    13. M 18:43 19:20 18:43
    14. M 19:03 19:15 19:03
    15. M 19:50 20:02 19:50
    16. M 20:19 21:07 20:19
    17. M 20:20 20:49 20:20
    18. M 20:52 21:54 20:52
    19. M 21:40 22:30 21:40
    20. M 22:02 22:12 21:04

    The fastest ever solo time (the team coach) was 14:59, and the fastest ever
    group time is a min or two faster.

    > Because 20:19 over 7 miles is ~20.7 mph.


    I'm not sure if you mean that's slow or fast. It's definitely slow amongst
    us Team Florida Cycling (University of Florida) members. I'm an
    urban/mountain biker anyways and riding road is fun sometimes.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  18. "Blair P. Houghton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>I did a time trial with my college team this past weekend. The location
    >>is
    >>11 miles away, and during the ride there, I got 2 flats! I managed to get
    >>enough air in the two wheels, and managed to get there in time to do the
    >>TT
    >>before everyone left. I ran a 20:19 for the 7-mile course, which was a
    >>lot
    >>better than the 22:00 I had gotten the last time I tried it. It wasn't
    >>until I got home and discovered that my tires were only inflated to
    >>30F/35R
    >>that I realized I could have broken 20 minutes. Oh well.

    >
    > How did you place in that TT? And where's that school?


    I placed 16th out of 20. Here were the results:

    Name Sex 1/8/05 Average Fastest
    1. M 16:12 15:55 14:59
    2. M 16:13 17:30 16:13
    3. F 17:05 17:30 16:40
    4. M 17:20 17:20 17:20
    5. M 17:28 17:15 15:51
    6. M 17:40 17:52 17:40
    7. M 17:41 17:57 17:29
    8. M 18:10 19:15 18:10
    9. M 18:24 18:24 18:24
    10. M 18:27 18:27 18:27
    11. M 18:28 18:54 18:04
    12. M 18:40 18:40 18:40
    13. M 18:43 19:20 18:43
    14. M 19:03 19:15 19:03
    15. M 19:50 20:02 19:50
    16. M 20:19 21:07 20:19
    17. M 20:20 20:49 20:20
    18. M 20:52 21:54 20:52
    19. M 21:40 22:30 21:40
    20. M 22:02 22:12 21:04

    The fastest ever solo time (the team coach) was 14:59, and the fastest ever
    group time is a min or two faster.

    > Because 20:19 over 7 miles is ~20.7 mph.


    I'm not sure if you mean that's slow or fast. It's definitely slow amongst
    us Team Florida Cycling (University of Florida) members. I'm an
    urban/mountain biker anyways and riding road is fun sometimes.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  19. "Blair P. Houghton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>I did a time trial with my college team this past weekend. The location
    >>is
    >>11 miles away, and during the ride there, I got 2 flats! I managed to get
    >>enough air in the two wheels, and managed to get there in time to do the
    >>TT
    >>before everyone left. I ran a 20:19 for the 7-mile course, which was a
    >>lot
    >>better than the 22:00 I had gotten the last time I tried it. It wasn't
    >>until I got home and discovered that my tires were only inflated to
    >>30F/35R
    >>that I realized I could have broken 20 minutes. Oh well.

    >
    > How did you place in that TT? And where's that school?


    I placed 16th out of 20. Here were the results:

    Name Sex 1/8/05 Average Fastest
    1. M 16:12 15:55 14:59
    2. M 16:13 17:30 16:13
    3. F 17:05 17:30 16:40
    4. M 17:20 17:20 17:20
    5. M 17:28 17:15 15:51
    6. M 17:40 17:52 17:40
    7. M 17:41 17:57 17:29
    8. M 18:10 19:15 18:10
    9. M 18:24 18:24 18:24
    10. M 18:27 18:27 18:27
    11. M 18:28 18:54 18:04
    12. M 18:40 18:40 18:40
    13. M 18:43 19:20 18:43
    14. M 19:03 19:15 19:03
    15. M 19:50 20:02 19:50
    16. M 20:19 21:07 20:19
    17. M 20:20 20:49 20:20
    18. M 20:52 21:54 20:52
    19. M 21:40 22:30 21:40
    20. M 22:02 22:12 21:04

    The fastest ever solo time (the team coach) was 14:59, and the fastest ever
    group time is a min or two faster.

    > Because 20:19 over 7 miles is ~20.7 mph.


    I'm not sure if you mean that's slow or fast. It's definitely slow amongst
    us Team Florida Cycling (University of Florida) members. I'm an
    urban/mountain biker anyways and riding road is fun sometimes.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  20. "Blair P. Houghton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>I did a time trial with my college team this past weekend. The location
    >>is
    >>11 miles away, and during the ride there, I got 2 flats! I managed to get
    >>enough air in the two wheels, and managed to get there in time to do the
    >>TT
    >>before everyone left. I ran a 20:19 for the 7-mile course, which was a
    >>lot
    >>better than the 22:00 I had gotten the last time I tried it. It wasn't
    >>until I got home and discovered that my tires were only inflated to
    >>30F/35R
    >>that I realized I could have broken 20 minutes. Oh well.

    >
    > How did you place in that TT? And where's that school?


    I placed 16th out of 20. Here were the results:

    Name Sex 1/8/05 Average Fastest
    1. M 16:12 15:55 14:59
    2. M 16:13 17:30 16:13
    3. F 17:05 17:30 16:40
    4. M 17:20 17:20 17:20
    5. M 17:28 17:15 15:51
    6. M 17:40 17:52 17:40
    7. M 17:41 17:57 17:29
    8. M 18:10 19:15 18:10
    9. M 18:24 18:24 18:24
    10. M 18:27 18:27 18:27
    11. M 18:28 18:54 18:04
    12. M 18:40 18:40 18:40
    13. M 18:43 19:20 18:43
    14. M 19:03 19:15 19:03
    15. M 19:50 20:02 19:50
    16. M 20:19 21:07 20:19
    17. M 20:20 20:49 20:20
    18. M 20:52 21:54 20:52
    19. M 21:40 22:30 21:40
    20. M 22:02 22:12 21:04

    The fastest ever solo time (the team coach) was 14:59, and the fastest ever
    group time is a min or two faster.

    > Because 20:19 over 7 miles is ~20.7 mph.


    I'm not sure if you mean that's slow or fast. It's definitely slow amongst
    us Team Florida Cycling (University of Florida) members. I'm an
    urban/mountain biker anyways and riding road is fun sometimes.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
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