Entering the world of cycling, HELP!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by KtecR, Feb 18, 2004.

  1. KtecR

    KtecR New Member

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    I have been into BMX, street riding, and flatland for the greater part of my life and have always loved bikes. The college i am now going to has a cycling club and I am very interested in joining. I am not looking at spending several thousand dollars on equipment but i would like a bike that would last me a while without becoming obsolete too quickly. Any suggestions on what road bike would be ideal for me? Type of frame, type of equipment/components, and other things to look for?

    I understand that with most bikes I will also need to buy a set of pedals and clipless shoes... again, what are some reasonable priced pedals/shoes? The Shimano PD-M515 and the Look PP206 seemed like good bang for the buck pedals.

    Also, would it be best to start off with a used bike or does a new one make that big of a difference when it comes to road bikes? I have purchased a couple used bikes, new bikes, and built a few of my own in the past but they were single geared BMX/Freestyle bikes. Any help would be appreciated so just throw in your 2 cents. Thanks
     
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  2. Brizza

    Brizza New Member

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    Welcome to the world of cycling, visas are only required for racing :)

    Start with a simple bike and if you enjoy the riding it will make you stronger and appreciate a good bike.

    The lower level componentry will see some changes in the next few years as Dura Ace has moved to 10 speed and Ultegra will most likely make the shift later this year.

    If you have a BMX background you might do well to get into XC or DH riding, I find the skills of BMX riders transfer nicely to MTB.

    Pedals are a bit of a system, once you buy you are looked into the system for a few years. Look are a reasonable entry level, but compared to the higher level stuff they are very outdated. They use the same design from 1982 (?)
    SPD is transferable to XC but SPDR is much better for road.

    I have seen many riders get over competitive and loose the enjoyment of the sport, if you take up racing make sure you enjoy your riding and if you can apply your enjoyment/passion to the race you will grow to do better than many who train themselves to death.

    I hope it goes well

    Brian
     
  3. dfchatten

    dfchatten New Member

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    There are many very nice road bikes you can purchase under $800. I'm in my second season of cycling, and I purchased a Specialized Sequoia Sport for $799. I cycled almost 2000 road miles in 03, and 500+ on the trainer so far this season.

    I would bank on spending upward of $60-75 for the clipless peddles and $50-75 for shoes. Now, I do understand that prices may vary depending on when you decide to purchase, but that is a good ball park. Nashbar and Performance always have sales.

    My only other recommendation is not to get something so low end that you grow out of it too quickly. I was given that advise, and I am glade that I considered that when purchasing my bike. You will also most definitly spend more $ on other items - socks, pants, shirts, rain gear, cold gear, et al. And it is not a matter of looking good, but rather being ready for any type of weather, and standing out enough that drivers can see you.

    Good luck and enjoy the ride.

    Dan
     
  4. KtecR

    KtecR New Member

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    Thanks for the info. I was looking at spending between 750-1000 on a bike and around the same price for shoes/pedals. I've looked at the other accessories (shirt, shorts, etc) and it all adds up pretty quickly. I'm not going to be involved in much racing since my school offers it as rides/training for the MS150 (houston to austin) about 2-3 times a week.

    BTW, cross country and down hill are still road cycling right? I will be involved in inner-outer city rides and Houston doesn't have any real hills or mountains to do MTB or DH.

    I will have to settle as being an urban warrior for some time, the sooner i get a road bike, the sooner i can stop having to ride my flatland bike with 34-17 gearing (hell on 10 mile trips around the area). JK, I stopped being stupid like that once I got my license.
     
  5. fushman

    fushman New Member

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    get out now while you still have youre beer/drug money
     
  6. Brizza

    Brizza New Member

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    XC and DH are specific MTB disciplines.

    XC involves riding up and down MTB trails, while DH involves very fast down (walk up).

    If there are no trails then I guess you are limited to road.

    Brian
     
  7. Hitchy

    Hitchy New Member

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    G'day,

    I agree with Fushman!....If its got a pussy or tyres....its gunna cost ya money!.....lol.......I saw a bloke with a T- shirt the other day that read

    CYCLING

    5% Fitness
    5% determination
    5% Skill
    85% Expensive Titanium 'go faster' bits!

    cheers,

    Hitchy
     
  8. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

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    Check out all of your local bike shops. At least one of them is likey to be aware of what it takes to fit you up on a bike. If they're good to talk to and don't try to push you into buying something, you stand a good chance of being led in the right direction.
    The fit of the bike is one of the most important factors in your decision. Second-hand is a good way to go as long as it fits and hasn't been thrashed / crashed. Let someone else carry the premium on buying new only to find they don't like riding.
     
  9. KtecR

    KtecR New Member

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    My parents are big on buying second-hand products when it comes to anything involving wheels or that floats on water that costs a hefty chunk of change, therefore I will probably be spending a lot of time looking at classifieds. My LBSs for the most part are more interested in sealing the deal, but some have more heart than others.

    I went to a shop and got my frame length and its a 56 or 58 so I'm guessing a 58 would be more logical if I am still somewhat growing (1/2 - 1 inch left in me i guess).

    fushman and Hitchy, i agree with yall completely. there are going to have to be some serious comprises between my car and bike.
     
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