Entry level mountain bikes

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Andrew Lighten, Dec 14, 2003.

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  1. Hi everyone;

    My wife is toying with the idea of replacing her 15+ year old Repco Hotham with a new entry level
    mountain bike.

    The intended use is local commuting, taking bubby to grandparents and back (~5km) and some light
    day rides.

    She is considering the Giant Upland SE and the Trek 4100. Can anyone offer an opinion on either of
    these bikes?

    FWIW, she's about 5'11" and reasonably fit without being superhuman. (Horse riding fit).

    Thanks, Andrew.
     
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  2. waffle

    waffle New Member

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    "The intended use is local commuting, taking bubby to grandparents and back (~5km) and some light
    day rides."

    then why get a mountain bike?? superfulous front suspension forks, heavy frame (as per entry level mtb bikes). try a flat bar "road bike" or a comfort bike.
     
  3. waffle wrote:
    > "The intended use is local commuting, taking bubby to grandparents and back (~5km) and some light
    > day rides."
    >
    > then why get a mountain bike?? superfulous front suspension forks, heavy frame (as per entry level
    > mtb bikes). try a flat bar "road bike" or a comfort bike.
    >

    The area we live in has a fair amount of bush and it's likely to be used off-road as much as on-
    road. Her old bike was a mountain bike, and she'd like to replace it with the same sort of bike.
    Plus, she will want to mount a baby seat over the rear wheel, so she wants something a little
    rugged. The weight isn't really an issue.
     
  4. Andrew Lighten <[email protected]> wrote:
    : waffle wrote:
    :> "The intended use is local commuting, taking bubby to grandparents and back (~5km) and some light
    :> day rides."
    :>
    :> then why get a mountain bike?? superfulous front suspension forks, heavy frame (as per entry
    :> level mtb bikes). try a flat bar "road bike" or a comfort bike.
    :>

    : The area we live in has a fair amount of bush and it's likely to be used off-road as much as on-
    : road. Her old bike was a mountain bike, and she'd like to replace it with the same sort of bike.
    : Plus, she will want to mount a baby seat over the rear wheel, so she wants something a little
    : rugged. The weight isn't really an issue.

    I know you don't want to get into the argument, but I'd like someone to give evidence that an entry
    level MTB is rugged - or by inference, more rugged than a road bike. They certainly are heavier but
    none of the components are particularly more rugged - a crappy bike is a crappy bike regardless of
    whether it's a MTB or roadie. Oh, and weight does make a lot of difference. A heavy bike is a chore
    for anyone to ride.

    I'd take the advice offered by others and look seriously at what's available in a hybrid (comfort)
    bike. I doubt you could get an entry level MTB these days without some stinking crap heavy supension
    forks anyway. Other than that, check out the second hand market. There are bargains galore in entry
    level MTBs.

    Well, that's my advice, cheerz, Lynzz
     
  5. Lindsay Rowlands wrote:
    > Andrew Lighten <[email protected]> wrote: I know you don't want to get into the argument...

    You're right. :)
     
  6. Gaza

    Gaza Guest

    I bought a Giant Boulder SE a couple of months ago ,new, for $384. Been extremely happy with it for
    the price and what it is. I also have bitumen friendly tyres fitted for commuting to work and they
    are adequate on 4wd type roads. I just took off for a 4 day unsupported ride from Tenterfield to
    Grafton (250k) along the Bi-centenial trail (notes to follow, when I get time) and had no mechanical
    problems or flats and the bike lugged myself and all my camping equipment food and water admirably

    "Andrew Lighten" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Lindsay Rowlands wrote:
    > > Andrew Lighten <[email protected]> wrote: I know you don't want to get into the argument...
    >
    > You're right. :)
     
  7. Marc_9

    Marc_9 Guest

    If you intend to mount a baby/child seat to the bike, may i suggest you stick with a Mtbike. I
    bought a relatively heavy aluminium bodied Apollo LSR 1.0 early this year. My wife got a Giant
    Boulder SE around the same time. Found the slightly heavier Apollo more suitable for carry the
    child. When loaded with the kid, the Giant's front wheel appeared to tip up when stationary. Don't
    have such a problem with the APollo. That's been my experience. Dont even think of using a road or
    comfort bike in my opinion. The kid is around 16kg at the moment, the Giant is around 14kg and the
    Apollo 15kg. Marc

    "gaza" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]
    berlin.de>...
    > I bought a Giant Boulder SE a couple of months ago ,new, for $384. Been extremely happy with it
    > for the price and what it is. I also have bitumen friendly tyres fitted for commuting to work and
    > they are adequate on 4wd type roads. I just took off for a 4 day unsupported ride from Tenterfield
    > to Grafton (250k) along the Bi-centenial trail (notes to follow, when I get time) and had no
    > mechanical problems or flats and the bike lugged myself and all my camping equipment food and
    > water admirably
    >
    > "Andrew Lighten" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Lindsay Rowlands wrote:
    > > > Andrew Lighten <[email protected]> wrote: I know you don't want to get into the argument...
    > >
    > > You're right. :)
     
  8. maybe this can be the trigger to get someone else back on a bike as well? ;-) We have agreement in
    concept, just need to get the bike, and someone on it!!! I was told I could get her one for
    Christmas !!!

    on a more serious note, to be comparing the Trek 4100, you need to look at the Giant Rincon, as
    they're closer in the bikes themselves...

    Avanti do the Atomic, but its starting to get over the $500 mark...

    Will chat to you about it sometime soon...

    www.mtbr.com is a good site for you guys to check out...

    Cheers,

    Andrew

    "Andrew Lighten" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi everyone;
    >
    > My wife is toying with the idea of replacing her 15+ year old Repco Hotham with a new entry level
    > mountain bike.
    >
    > The intended use is local commuting, taking bubby to grandparents and back (~5km) and some light
    > day rides.
    >
    > She is considering the Giant Upland SE and the Trek 4100. Can anyone offer an opinion on either of
    > these bikes?
    >
    > FWIW, she's about 5'11" and reasonably fit without being superhuman. (Horse riding fit).
    >
    > Thanks, Andrew.
     
  9. Arpit

    Arpit Guest

    On 14 Dec 2003 15:56:02 GMT, Lindsay Rowlands
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Andrew Lighten <[email protected]> wrote:
    >: waffle wrote:
    >:> "The intended use is local commuting, taking bubby to grandparents and back (~5km) and some
    >:> light day rides."
    >:>
    >:> then why get a mountain bike?? superfulous front suspension forks, heavy frame (as per entry
    >:> level mtb bikes). try a flat bar "road bike" or a comfort bike.
    >:>
    >
    >: The area we live in has a fair amount of bush and it's likely to be used off-road as much as on-
    >: road. Her old bike was a mountain bike, and she'd like to replace it with the same sort of bike.
    >: Plus, she will want to mount a baby seat over the rear wheel, so she wants something a little
    >: rugged. The weight isn't really an issue.
    >
    >I know you don't want to get into the argument, but I'd like someone to give evidence that an entry
    >level MTB is rugged - or by inference, more rugged than a road bike. They certainly are heavier but
    >none of the components are particularly more rugged - a crappy bike is a crappy bike regardless of
    >whether it's a MTB or roadie. Oh, and weight does make a lot of difference. A heavy bike is a chore
    >for anyone to ride.
    >
    >I'd take the advice offered by others and look seriously at what's available in a hybrid (comfort)
    >bike. I doubt you could get an entry level MTB these days without some stinking crap heavy
    >supension forks anyway. Other than that, check out the second hand market. There are bargains
    >galore in entry level MTBs.
    >

    I dunno, i can do 1- 1.5 meter drops without really stressing my giant boulder se- the rear
    derailler clangs when the bike lands though, but its really solid, i'm not sure abou road bikes
    today, but i picked up an old one from the side of the road wanting to restore it for my father, who
    didnt want to fork out for even a kmart bike, and i certainly wouldnt want to go down a flight of
    steps or with it. then again, i wouldnt go down a flight of steps on my current bike if i had a baby
    strapped onto the back.

    >Well, that's my advice, cheerz, Lynzz
     
  10. Arpit

    Arpit Guest

    YEAH! me too! its a bit heavy with the 2.5 kilo battery on it for my light, but it its solid.
    congrats on the rides, im hoping to do some rides like that this time next year

    On Mon, 15 Dec 2003 09:00:29 +1000, "gaza" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I bought a Giant Boulder SE a couple of months ago ,new, for $384. Been extremely happy with it for
    >the price and what it is. I also have bitumen friendly tyres fitted for commuting to work and they
    >are adequate on 4wd type roads. I just took off for a 4 day unsupported ride from Tenterfield to
    >Grafton (250k) along the Bi-centenial trail (notes to follow, when I get time) and had no
    >mechanical problems or flats and the bike lugged myself and all my camping equipment food and water
    >admirably
    >
    >"Andrew Lighten" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> Lindsay Rowlands wrote:
    >> > Andrew Lighten <[email protected]> wrote: I know you don't want to get into the argument...
    >>
    >> You're right. :)
    >
     
  11. marc_9 wrote:
    > If you intend to mount a baby/child seat to the bike, may i suggest you stick with a Mtbike. I
    > bought a relatively heavy aluminium bodied Apollo LSR 1.0 early this year. My wife got a Giant
    > Boulder SE around the same time. Found the slightly heavier Apollo more suitable for carry the
    > child. When loaded with the kid, the Giant's front wheel appeared to tip up when stationary. Don't
    > have such a problem with the APollo. That's been my experience. Dont even think of using a road or
    > comfort bike in my opinion. The kid is around 16kg at the moment, the Giant is around 14kg and the
    > Apollo 15kg. Marc

    Hmm... that's kinda scary. The Upload SE was on the original list, but based on the fact that the
    Boulder SE is just a tad more money and the fact that "gaza" indicated he had no trouble with one as
    a good entry level bike, that was what we're leaning toward right now. If it will tip up with a baby
    on the back that's no good at all.

    How much would that have to do with the design of the child seat rather than the frame
    geometry? I guess if bubby is too far behind the rear wheel it will unload the front. Which
    child seat did you buy?
     
  12. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "Arpit" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > I dunno, i can do 1- 1.5 meter drops without really stressing my giant boulder se- the rear
    > derailler clangs when the bike lands though, but

    1.5 metre? Are you sure? That's 4.5 feet. Or, it's like the height of your bars plus the height of a
    wheel on top. That's a farkin big drop on a hardtail for 'normal' people.

    hippy "N V US" ;-)
     
  13. Marc_9

    Marc_9 Guest

    I noticed pretty much all the standard child seats appear to be made by the same factory, probably
    in China or Taiwan. The one we have is the Rosebank. It has a black main body with a bright orange
    adjustable head rest. No I strongly doubt if the geometery of the Boulder SE is off. It is probably
    the set back of the seat that puts it a little off kilter when stationery. That is all, appears ok
    when on the move. I guess my main point here was that the Giant Boulder SE is slightly lighter than
    my Apollo LSR 1.0. I also noticed that the front shocks of the Apollo is steel, while the Giant is
    aluminium. This probably makes the Apollo a bit more stable with the heavy load on its back. It
    doesnt bother me particularly. I just prefer to carry the bub on the Apollo as opposed to the
    lighter Giant, that is all. marc

    Andrew Lighten <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > marc_9 wrote:
    > > If you intend to mount a baby/child seat to the bike, may i suggest you stick with a Mtbike. I
    > > bought a relatively heavy aluminium bodied Apollo LSR 1.0 early this year. My wife got a Giant
    > > Boulder SE around the same time. Found the slightly heavier Apollo more suitable for carry the
    > > child. When loaded with the kid, the Giant's front wheel appeared to tip up when stationary.
    > > Don't have such a problem with the APollo. That's been my experience. Dont even think of using a
    > > road or comfort bike in my opinion. The kid is around 16kg at the moment, the Giant is around
    > > 14kg and the Apollo 15kg. Marc
    >
    > Hmm... that's kinda scary. The Upload SE was on the original list, but based on the fact that the
    > Boulder SE is just a tad more money and the fact that "gaza" indicated he had no trouble with one
    > as a good entry level bike, that was what we're leaning toward right now. If it will tip up with a
    > baby on the back that's no good at all.
    >
    > How much would that have to do with the design of the child seat rather than the frame geometry?
    > I guess if bubby is too far behind the rear wheel it will unload the front. Which child seat did
    > you buy?
     
  14. Arpit

    Arpit Guest

    On Tue, 16 Dec 2003 21:38:13 GMT, "hippy"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Arpit" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:p[email protected]...
    >> I dunno, i can do 1- 1.5 meter drops without really stressing my giant boulder se- the rear
    >> derailler clangs when the bike lands though, but
    >
    >1.5 metre? Are you sure? That's 4.5 feet. Or, it's like the height of your bars plus the height of
    > a wheel on top. That's a farkin big drop on a hardtail for 'normal' people.

    yep im sure, i try not to do it too often though, it hurts my wrists with my cheap fork

    >
    >hippy "N V US" ;-)
     
  15. gescom

    gescom New Member

    Joined:
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    I saw an article in Australian Cyclist magazine where a couple were touring with their child in a special trailer attached to the bike. Might be more expensive but has the advantages of suspension and a wind/rain/sun cover. Would be alot safer as well.

    Importantly it could attach to any bike you get.

    Here's a link to a good guide regarding child seats and trailers on Bicycle Victoria's website and a cute picture. :)http://www.bv.com.au/content.cfm?submenuid=66&contentid=167


    The trailer manufacturer. They even sell modles that can convert for use as a stroller and can store groceries. http://www.burley.com/products/childrens-products/default.aspx?p=Encore&i=1

    Greenspeed in Victoria sell them. http://www.greenspeed.com.au/trailers.htm
     
  16. gescom wrote:

    > I saw an article in Australian Cyclist magazine where a couple were touring with their child in a
    > special trailer attached to the bike. Might be more expensive but has the advantages of suspension
    > and a wind/rain/sun cover. Would be alot safer as well.

    We considered the trailer idea, but we're going to go with the seat attached to the bike. The
    trailers that I've seen are a *LOT* more expensive; those that we've seen have started in the $500-
    700 price bracket, which is at least twice the price of a really high quality seat. The other factor
    is that bubby would be a little further away in the trailer. We figure it would be nice having our
    little one right there on the bike with you so we can talk to her during the ride, stop and point
    things out, etc.

    I guess if you're spending a large chunk of time touring it would be better, but for local commutes
    we reckon the seat is the way to go.
     
  17. Andrew Lighten wrote:

    >
    > We considered the trailer idea, but we're going to go with the seat attached to the bike. The
    > trailers that I've seen are a *LOT* more expensive; those that we've seen have started in the $500-
    > 700 price bracket, which is at least twice the price of a really high quality seat. The other
    > factor is that bubby would be a little further away in the trailer. We figure it would be nice
    > having our little one right there on the bike with you so we can talk to her during the ride, stop
    > and point things out, etc.
    >
    > I guess if you're spending a large chunk of time touring it would be better, but for local
    > commutes we reckon the seat is the way to go.
    >
    Worst thing I've seen is one of those old kindy chairs occy strapped to the rear rack with a belt
    around the middle. The parents should be locked up.

    --
    Cheers Damian Harvey

    www.mazzoir.textamerica.com is my moblog.

    Ha.
     
  18. Fred Nieman

    Fred Nieman Guest

    marc_9 wrote:
    >
    > Andrew Lighten <[email protected]> wrote in message ...

    After reading this, I just couldn't help but imagine the scene down at the bike shop: on the scales
    go cranks, BBs, frames, kiddie seats, kiddies... "Can we retro-fit Junior with a rear 10-speed
    toddling gruppo and a titanium bone-set? ..."

    p

    ps: all the best to you, and your kiddies, btw.
     
  19. Kingsley

    Kingsley Guest

    On Sun, 14 Dec 2003 19:59:43 +1100, Andrew Lighten wrote:

    > The intended use is local commuting, taking bubby to grandparents and back (~5km) and some light
    > day rides.
    >
    > She is considering the Giant Upland SE and the Trek 4100. Can anyone offer an opinion on either of
    > these bikes?

    We bought a Giant Upland for my dad yesterday. There are two models, the basic and the 'SE'(?).
    Essentially the difference seems to be the front suspension. We got the base model - my mum was
    paying so I had a limited budget.

    For the money ($320 at our lBS), it's a nice bike. At that sort of price range you're never
    going to get anything very flash. It's a 7-speed with what looks like a huge range on the rear
    cluster. Polished alloy (aluminium?) frame, to pick it up it's very light (19" size). It does
    come with knobbly tyres though - get these swapped over for (semi)slicks, something more suited
    to road use anyway.

    It also has one of those "Not for Offroad Use" stickers on the frame though. I was a bit surprised
    to see this actually. I guess it never will go offroad, but thought these stickers ended up
    exclusively on department store bikes.

    -kt

    --
    Kingsley Turner, (mailto: [email protected]) http://MadDogsBreakfast.com - Travel
    Tales: The good, bad, and down-right ugly
     
  20. kingsley wrote:

    > We bought a Giant Upland for my dad yesterday. There are two models, the basic and the 'SE'(?).
    > Essentially the difference seems to be the front suspension. We got the base model - my mum was
    > paying so I had a limited budget.
    >
    > For the money ($320 at our lBS), it's a nice bike. At that sort of price range you're never
    > going to get anything very flash. It's a 7-speed with what looks like a huge range on the rear
    > cluster. Polished alloy (aluminium?) frame, to pick it up it's very light (19" size). It does
    > come with knobbly tyres though - get these swapped over for (semi)slicks, something more suited
    > to road use anyway.

    I'll consider the road tyre swap: that sounds like a good idea. I've got a semi-slick on my mountain
    bike, and they're actually pretty good on-road.

    $320 sounds like a bit for a basic Upland (I keep thinking "Upload" for some reason; too much time
    at the keyboard), but I guess at your LBS in the Christmas rush you can expect to pay a little bit
    more. We're almost certainly going to go for a Boulder SE, and the best I've seen them for is $385.
    Our LBS sells them for $429. We're in a smallish country town about 180km NW of Melbourne, and I
    have no desire at all to do ~400km to save $40. :)
     
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