Entry level recumbent purchase very soon

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Ken M, Jan 1, 2006.

  1. Ken M

    Ken M Guest

    I posted a message here "Short wheel base for beginner" a little over a
    week ago, and I got some good advise. However from some recent net
    research most seem to recommend a different type of bike. So now I am
    more leaning towards a lwb or a clwb model. There are three that I have
    found so far that seem to be in my "entry level" price range. The SUN
    EZ-1SC and the CYCLE GENIUS STARLING and the CYCLE GENIUS SPARROW. I am
    really leaning towards the EZ-1. My reasoning on this one is the
    reputation of SUN. And the fact that most (all?) the EZ models were
    designed by the folks at EASY RACERS. Does any one own a EZ-1SC? If so
    how do you like it? I am test riding one on Tuesday. How about the two
    CYCLE GENIUS bikes? The dealer I am going to test ride the SUN is also a
    CYCLE GENIUS dealer.

    Ken
    --
    [T]he bicycle is the most efficient machine ever created: Converting
    calories into gas, a bicycle gets the equivalent of three thousand miles
    per gallon. ~Bill Strickland, The Quotable Cyclist

    Homepage: http://kcm-home.tripod.com/
     
    Tags:


  2. Edward Dolan

    Edward Dolan Guest

    "Ken M" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I posted a message here "Short wheel base for beginner" a little over a
    >week ago, and I got some good advise. However from some recent net research
    >most seem to recommend a different type of bike. So now I am more leaning
    >towards a lwb or a clwb model. There are three that I have found so far
    >that seem to be in my "entry level" price range. The SUN EZ-1SC and the
    >CYCLE GENIUS STARLING and the CYCLE GENIUS SPARROW. I am really leaning
    >towards the EZ-1. My reasoning on this one is the reputation of SUN. And
    >the fact that most (all?) the EZ models were designed by the folks at EASY
    >RACERS. Does any one own a EZ-1SC? If so how do you like it? I am test
    >riding one on Tuesday. How about the two CYCLE GENIUS bikes? The dealer I
    >am going to test ride the SUN is also a CYCLE GENIUS dealer.


    The SUN EZ-1 is a great recumbent. The only criticisms I have ever heard
    about it are that it is a little on the heavy side and it sits you fairly
    upright because of the low crank. This could possibly effect comfort. But
    the seat seems to be quite good. Also, some do not like the 16" front wheel,
    preferring a 20" front wheel. I rode it briefly once and it handled like a
    dream. Why spend more when you can get a very good recumbent for less? I
    even like the looks of it.

    By the way, I am very much in favor of a company like SUN. They make
    recumbents that are not going to cost you an arm and a leg. Unless you are
    into racing you do not need a light super fast recumbent. Let's face it,
    most of us just ride our bikes around town for some fun and some exercise.
    You need a $2000. recumbent to do this?

    Regards,

    Ed Dolan - Minnesota
     
  3. Stonegrift

    Stonegrift Guest

    I do own an EZ-1 SC. Yes you do sit upright. I'm 5'8" and it sits
    about like riding in a truck with a bench seat. Only the slightest of
    recline. This is my first recumbent and the only issues I've come up
    against so far are that you have to hunt a bit to find a cycle
    computer that will work with the bike. I ended up mounting mine using
    the front wheel for speed and making a stand-off to mount the cadence
    sensor. The other issue I have found is the rear derailer height.
    This is definitely a road bike and you don't want to approach a bump
    at a narrow angle on the right side. The rear derailer will hit. So
    also be careful of soft ground. The rear wheel is a 20 inch wheel and
    the derailer hangs down close to 8 inches. The ride on chip sealed
    (tar and gravel) roads can be a bit rough (to me) but I put that down
    to the fact I'm sitting with no suspension.

    I will agree though that the EZ series of recumbents are good starter
    bikes that won't break your wallet. (I know I'm quoting that from
    someplace) I like the bike,


    On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 10:55:06 -0500, Ken M <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I posted a message here "Short wheel base for beginner" a little over a
    >week ago, and I got some good advise. However from some recent net
    >research most seem to recommend a different type of bike. So now I am
    >more leaning towards a lwb or a clwb model. There are three that I have
    >found so far that seem to be in my "entry level" price range. The SUN
    >EZ-1SC and the CYCLE GENIUS STARLING and the CYCLE GENIUS SPARROW. I am
    >really leaning towards the EZ-1. My reasoning on this one is the
    >reputation of SUN. And the fact that most (all?) the EZ models were
    >designed by the folks at EASY RACERS. Does any one own a EZ-1SC? If so
    >how do you like it? I am test riding one on Tuesday. How about the two
    >CYCLE GENIUS bikes? The dealer I am going to test ride the SUN is also a
    >CYCLE GENIUS dealer.
    >
    >Ken
     
  4. Ken M

    Ken M Guest

    Edward Dolan wrote:

    >
    > The SUN EZ-1 is a great recumbent. The only criticisms I have ever heard
    > about it are that it is a little on the heavy side and it sits you fairly
    > upright because of the low crank. This could possibly effect comfort. But
    > the seat seems to be quite good. Also, some do not like the 16" front wheel,
    > preferring a 20" front wheel. I rode it briefly once and it handled like a
    > dream. Why spend more when you can get a very good recumbent for less? I
    > even like the looks of it.
    >

    It looks better than the CYCLE GENIUS models I was looking at, although
    I haven't seen either of them up close yet. I had the pleasure of riding
    one of SUNs other (more $$$) models and it was like limo ride. Well the
    way I figure it, you start out at an entry level type bike, and then if
    you continue to enjoy it you step up at the next bike purchase.

    > By the way, I am very much in favor of a company like SUN. They make
    > recumbents that are not going to cost you an arm and a leg. Unless you are
    > into racing you do not need a light super fast recumbent. Let's face it,
    > most of us just ride our bikes around town for some fun and some exercise.
    > You need a $2000. recumbent to do this?
    >

    The model I test rode at the bike shop where I bought my latest diamond
    frame bike, I think it was a EZ-SPORT price tag was marked $1599.00 I
    thought that was a bit pricey for a first bike. My current price range
    is $500-$750 which, to me seems more reasonable for a first 'bent'.

    Ken

    --
    [T]he bicycle is the most efficient machine ever created: Converting
    calories into gas, a bicycle gets the equivalent of three thousand miles
    per gallon. ~Bill Strickland, The Quotable Cyclist

    Homepage: http://kcm-home.tripod.com/
     
  5. Ken M

    Ken M Guest

    Stonegrift wrote:
    > I do own an EZ-1 SC. Yes you do sit upright. I'm 5'8" and it sits
    > about like riding in a truck with a bench seat. Only the slightest of
    > recline. This is my first recumbent and the only issues I've come up
    > against so far are that you have to hunt a bit to find a cycle
    > computer that will work with the bike. I ended up mounting mine using
    > the front wheel for speed and making a stand-off to mount the cadence
    > sensor. The other issue I have found is the rear derailer height.
    > This is definitely a road bike and you don't want to approach a bump
    > at a narrow angle on the right side. The rear derailer will hit. So
    > also be careful of soft ground. The rear wheel is a 20 inch wheel and
    > the derailer hangs down close to 8 inches. The ride on chip sealed
    > (tar and gravel) roads can be a bit rough (to me) but I put that down
    > to the fact I'm sitting with no suspension.
    >

    Well I have a diamond frame that I will continue to use for short hops
    around town and on my commute (3 miles one way). I want to use a
    recumbent for longer rides. I have back issues that give me discomfort
    on longer rides on upright road bikes. My diamond frame is a hybrid /
    comfort type bike and the upright position is comfortable, but the
    aerodynamic drag is high, so from what I have been reading a recumbent
    may be a better bike for me for longer rides.

    > I will agree though that the EZ series of recumbents are good starter
    > bikes that won't break your wallet. (I know I'm quoting that from
    > someplace) I like the bike,
    >


    I think that is a quote from the SUN website. Thanks I appreciate the
    feedback.

    Ken
    --
    [T]he bicycle is the most efficient machine ever created: Converting
    calories into gas, a bicycle gets the equivalent of three thousand miles
    per gallon. ~Bill Strickland, The Quotable Cyclist

    Homepage: http://kcm-home.tripod.com/
     
  6. Edward Dolan

    Edward Dolan Guest

    "Ken M" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Edward Dolan wrote:

    [...]
    >> By the way, I am very much in favor of a company like SUN. They make
    >> recumbents that are not going to cost you an arm and a leg. Unless you
    >> are into racing you do not need a light super fast recumbent. Let's face
    >> it, most of us just ride our bikes around town for some fun and some
    >> exercise. You need a $2000. recumbent to do this?
    >>

    > The model I test rode at the bike shop where I bought my latest diamond
    > frame bike, I think it was a EZ-SPORT price tag was marked $1599.00 I
    > thought that was a bit pricey for a first bike. My current price range is
    > $500-$750 which, to me seems more reasonable for a first 'bent'.


    Ken, I can't believe the way prices of bikes have gone sky high in the past
    30 years or so. I got my first upright for a little over $100. (a very nice
    French one). Now you have to pay at least several hundred in order to get a
    fairly good upright bike.

    But recumbents exist in another universe than uprights. They are all just so
    damn expensive. $500. - $750. is an excellent price point for recumbents.
    Many on this group are into super expensive recumbents. Even I worked my way
    up to a couple of $2000. recumbents, but I have a very bad conscience about
    it.

    I have little respect for manufacturers who only know how to bring our very
    expensive recumbents. I will save my respect and admiration for those
    manufacturers who have the smarts to figure out how to bring out a recumbent
    for a few hundred instead of a few thousand. I am of the opinion that any
    dumbbell can bring out a recumbent if price is no object. The trick is to be
    able to do it cheaply. That is why I rather like SUN. They have more smarts.

    Regards,

    Ed Dolan - Minnesota
     
  7. Ken M

    Ken M Guest

    Edward Dolan wrote:

    > Ken, I can't believe the way prices of bikes have gone sky high in the past
    > 30 years or so. I got my first upright for a little over $100. (a very nice
    > French one). Now you have to pay at least several hundred in order to get a
    > fairly good upright bike.
    >

    Yes, and for the several hundred dollars you only get an entry level
    bike these days.

    > But recumbents exist in another universe than uprights. They are all just so
    > damn expensive. $500. - $750. is an excellent price point for recumbents.
    > Many on this group are into super expensive recumbents. Even I worked my way
    > up to a couple of $2000. recumbents, but I have a very bad conscience about
    > it.
    >

    I suppose recumbents are in their own universe because they are not
    produced in numbers that diamond frames are. Super expensive bikes are
    nice, but may or may not be suitable for a beginner. I have been
    searching websites left and right looking for entry level type bikes,
    and have found several in my price range. RANS makes a couple I could
    stretch the price range to, SUN looks good, ACTIONBENT makes a couple of
    models but they have no local dealers. CYCLE GENIUS makes a couple in
    the my beginners bracket.

    > I have little respect for manufacturers who only know how to bring our very
    > expensive recumbents. I will save my respect and admiration for those
    > manufacturers who have the smarts to figure out how to bring out a recumbent
    > for a few hundred instead of a few thousand. I am of the opinion that any
    > dumbbell can bring out a recumbent if price is no object. The trick is to be
    > able to do it cheaply. That is why I rather like SUN. They have more smarts.
    >


    I agree with you on that point. If more companies would make and market
    lower price range bikes more people would buy them and expand the
    overall market of recumbents.

    Ken
    --
    [T]he bicycle is the most efficient machine ever created: Converting
    calories into gas, a bicycle gets the equivalent of three thousand miles
    per gallon. ~Bill Strickland, The Quotable Cyclist

    Homepage: http://kcm-home.tripod.com/
     
  8. Ken M wrote:
    > I posted a message here "Short wheel base for beginner" a little over a
    > week ago, and I got some good advise. However from some recent net
    > research most seem to recommend a different type of bike. So now I am
    > more leaning towards a lwb or a clwb model. There are three that I have
    > found so far that seem to be in my "entry level" price range. The SUN
    > EZ-1SC and the CYCLE GENIUS STARLING and the CYCLE GENIUS SPARROW. I am
    > really leaning towards the EZ-1. My reasoning on this one is the
    > reputation of SUN. And the fact that most (all?) the EZ models were
    > designed by the folks at EASY RACERS. Does any one own a EZ-1SC? If so
    > how do you like it? I am test riding one on Tuesday. How about the two
    > CYCLE GENIUS bikes? The dealer I am going to test ride the SUN is also a
    > CYCLE GENIUS dealer.


    There is nothing wrong with the bikes mentioned, as long as one accepts
    that their lower price comes at the expense of weight and component
    quality. In addition, unlike a bike such as the RANS Rocket which will
    be faster than an upright road bike in flat to rolling and windy
    conditions, the bicycles mentioned above will be slower than a normal
    drop-bar upright in most conditions.

    If the limitations of the entry level CLWB's bikes do not interfere
    with the intended use of the potential owner, they are excellent values
    for the money. If riding fast and/or long distances is expected, there
    are much better choices (that cost considerably more).

    --
    Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley
     
  9. Mike Rice

    Mike Rice Guest

    On Sun, 1 Jan 2006 11:45:58 -0600, "Edward Dolan" <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    <snip>
    >
    >I have little respect for manufacturers who only know how to bring our very
    >expensive recumbents. I will save my respect and admiration for those
    >manufacturers who have the smarts to figure out how to bring out a recumbent
    >for a few hundred instead of a few thousand. I am of the opinion that any
    >dumbbell can bring out a recumbent if price is no object. The trick is to be
    >able to do it cheaply. That is why I rather like SUN. They have more smarts.
    >
    >Regards,
    >
    >Ed Dolan - Minnesota
    >
    >


    It doesn't hurt that Gardner Martin had worked out the basic geometry
    with the Easy Racer line for many years before creating the Sun line.
    Sun bikes are an import ine, aren't they? I imagine the price would be
    considerably higher if the bikes were built in the US.

    I liked the ride of the Sun Sport model, but didn't feel that I was
    getting much of a noticable improvement over my old Shcwinn Varsity
    (in terms of travel for effort expended in only one test ride, comfort
    was certainly better on the Sun). The Tour Easy, though at least twice
    as costly as the Sun, did feel like less effort than the Shcwinn and I
    have no regrets about parting with the cash to get the bike I chose.

    Indiana Mike
     
  10. Mike Rice

    Mike Rice Guest

    On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 12:24:16 -0500, Ken M <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Stonegrift wrote:
    >> I do own an EZ-1 SC. Yes you do sit upright. I'm 5'8" and it sits
    >> about like riding in a truck with a bench seat. Only the slightest of
    >> recline. This is my first recumbent and the only issues I've come up
    >> against so far are that you have to hunt a bit to find a cycle
    >> computer that will work with the bike. I ended up mounting mine using
    >> the front wheel for speed and making a stand-off to mount the cadence
    >> sensor. The other issue I have found is the rear derailer height.
    >> This is definitely a road bike and you don't want to approach a bump
    >> at a narrow angle on the right side. The rear derailer will hit. So
    >> also be careful of soft ground. The rear wheel is a 20 inch wheel and
    >> the derailer hangs down close to 8 inches. The ride on chip sealed
    >> (tar and gravel) roads can be a bit rough (to me) but I put that down
    >> to the fact I'm sitting with no suspension.
    >>

    >Well I have a diamond frame that I will continue to use for short hops
    >around town and on my commute (3 miles one way). I want to use a
    >recumbent for longer rides. I have back issues that give me discomfort
    >on longer rides on upright road bikes. My diamond frame is a hybrid /
    >comfort type bike and the upright position is comfortable, but the
    >aerodynamic drag is high, so from what I have been reading a recumbent
    >may be a better bike for me for longer rides.
    >
    >> I will agree though that the EZ series of recumbents are good starter
    >> bikes that won't break your wallet. (I know I'm quoting that from
    >> someplace) I like the bike,
    >>

    >
    >I think that is a quote from the SUN website. Thanks I appreciate the
    >feedback.
    >
    >Ken


    My old Schwinn beat me up pretty good after 30 miles or so. My tour
    Easy is comfortable on rides of 50-70 miles.

    Indiana Mike
     
  11. Ken M

    Ken M Guest

    Mike Rice wrote:


    >
    > It doesn't hurt that Gardner Martin had worked out the basic geometry
    > with the Easy Racer line for many years before creating the Sun line.
    > Sun bikes are an import ine, aren't they? I imagine the price would be
    > considerably higher if the bikes were built in the US.
    >

    From what I have read they are made in Asia somewhere. And yeah I would
    think they would be considerable higher if they were made in the U.S.

    > I liked the ride of the Sun Sport model, but didn't feel that I was
    > getting much of a noticable improvement over my old Shcwinn Varsity
    > (in terms of travel for effort expended in only one test ride, comfort
    > was certainly better on the Sun). The Tour Easy, though at least twice
    > as costly as the Sun, did feel like less effort than the Shcwinn and I
    > have no regrets about parting with the cash to get the bike I chose.
    >


    Well that SPORT model did ride nice, but this being my first recumbent
    purchase I think I would like to stick to something a little less
    pricey, just in case I can't stand the bike. Not that I think that will
    happen, but sometimes it's hard to tell on a relatively short "test
    ride". Bike shops shop take a deposit, and then let you take the bike
    home and ride it for a couple of days of something. I don't know of any
    around here that do that though.

    Ken
    --
    [T]he bicycle is the most efficient machine ever created: Converting
    calories into gas, a bicycle gets the equivalent of three thousand miles
    per gallon. ~Bill Strickland, The Quotable Cyclist

    Homepage: http://kcm-home.tripod.com/
     
  12. Ken M

    Ken M Guest

    Mike Rice wrote:

    >>>I will agree though that the EZ series of recumbents are good starter
    >>>bikes that won't break your wallet. (I know I'm quoting that from
    >>>someplace) I like the bike,
    >>>

    >>
    >>I think that is a quote from the SUN website. Thanks I appreciate the
    >>feedback.
    >>
    >>Ken

    >
    >
    > My old Schwinn beat me up pretty good after 30 miles or so. My tour
    > Easy is comfortable on rides of 50-70 miles.
    >

    Yeah my Raleigh hybrid (32pounds, upright bars, sus fork) is comfortable
    up to about 40 miles or so. But the position I am forced to ride in
    make me and the bike like a sail in the wind. Most any given day riding
    in south Florida my average speed is limited to about 13mph.


    Ken
    --
    [T]he bicycle is the most efficient machine ever created: Converting
    calories into gas, a bicycle gets the equivalent of three thousand miles
    per gallon. ~Bill Strickland, The Quotable Cyclist

    Homepage: http://kcm-home.tripod.com/
     
  13. Ken M

    Ken M Guest

    Johnny Sunset wrote:

    >
    > There is nothing wrong with the bikes mentioned, as long as one accepts
    > that their lower price comes at the expense of weight and component
    > quality. In addition, unlike a bike such as the RANS Rocket which will
    > be faster than an upright road bike in flat to rolling and windy
    > conditions, the bicycles mentioned above will be slower than a normal
    > drop-bar upright in most conditions.
    >

    Well speed is not the most important thing for me. I like to ride some
    longer rides, but due to some old back injuries from MV accidents, I
    feel discomfort on a diamond frame bike with bars positioned much below
    two inches above the saddle. In other words (in case I didn't explain
    that right) when the bars go below two inches below the height of the
    saddle I have discomfort. So that kind of makes me like a big air dam. I
    usually start to feel the resistance at about 14 mph, with my average
    speed on rides of 10+ miles hovering around the 12 to 13mph range.

    > If the limitations of the entry level CLWB's bikes do not interfere
    > with the intended use of the potential owner, they are excellent values
    > for the money. If riding fast and/or long distances is expected, there
    > are much better choices (that cost considerably more).
    >

    Ah yes a better bike can always be had for more money!

    Ken
    --
    [T]he bicycle is the most efficient machine ever created: Converting
    calories into gas, a bicycle gets the equivalent of three thousand miles
    per gallon. ~Bill Strickland, The Quotable Cyclist

    Homepage: http://kcm-home.tripod.com/
     
  14. Ken M wrote:
    > Johnny Sunset wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > There is nothing wrong with the bikes mentioned, as long as one accepts
    > > that their lower price comes at the expense of weight and component
    > > quality. In addition, unlike a bike such as the RANS Rocket which will
    > > be faster than an upright road bike in flat to rolling and windy
    > > conditions, the bicycles mentioned above will be slower than a normal
    > > drop-bar upright in most conditions.
    > >

    > Well speed is not the most important thing for me. I like to ride some
    > longer rides, but due to some old back injuries from MV accidents, I
    > feel discomfort on a diamond frame bike with bars positioned much below
    > two inches above the saddle. In other words (in case I didn't explain
    > that right) when the bars go below two inches below the height of the
    > saddle I have discomfort. So that kind of makes me like a big air dam. I
    > usually start to feel the resistance at about 14 mph, with my average
    > speed on rides of 10+ miles hovering around the 12 to 13mph range.
    >
    > > If the limitations of the entry level CLWB's bikes do not interfere
    > > with the intended use of the potential owner, they are excellent values
    > > for the money. If riding fast and/or long distances is expected, there
    > > are much better choices (that cost considerably more).
    > >

    > Ah yes a better bike can always be had for more money!


    Ken,

    Since you mention aerodynamic drag on longer rides as a deficiency of
    riding an upright bicycle with higher handlebars, it is my opinion that
    a CLWB may not be the best bicycle for you. CLWB bikes with the
    relatively high seat, low BB and upright seating position are not that
    aerodynamic, and may be no better than riding a drop bar upright "on
    the hoods".

    I am not suggesting that you need to get a lowracer, highracer or fully
    faired bike, but a SWB bike with a reasonably high BB and seat recline
    will do much better in windy conditions. A LWB bicycle with a front
    fairing can also perform well.

    The used market may be the better alternative. Bikes such as the RANS
    Rocket and Vision R-40 (1999 and later R-40's are better) are/were made
    in relatively large quantities, and if not damaged by crashing or
    abuse, will likely only require minor work to be fully functional.
    There are other less common SWB models that occasionally show up on the
    used market.

    There are also some older LWB bikes (e.g. RANS Stratus, Easy Racers
    Tour Easy) that may fall into your price range. Just be aware that
    since these bikes were expensive when new, those selling for less than
    $1,000 will be quite old. The main concern here will be that they might
    be equipped with things like 6-speed freewheels, so upgrading to modern
    drive trains could be expensive. And of course, with any older
    bicycles, the frame should be inspected for signs of damage and fatigue
    cracking. Also, these bicycles perform much better with front fairings,
    so I would look for a used bike with the fairing included.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley
     
  15. Ken M

    Ken M Guest

    Johnny Sunset wrote:

    > Ken,
    >
    > Since you mention aerodynamic drag on longer rides as a deficiency of
    > riding an upright bicycle with higher handlebars, it is my opinion that
    > a CLWB may not be the best bicycle for you. CLWB bikes with the
    > relatively high seat, low BB and upright seating position are not that
    > aerodynamic, and may be no better than riding a drop bar upright "on
    > the hoods".
    >

    Well I think my diamond frame rides even higher, more upright than a
    road bike "on the hoods".

    > I am not suggesting that you need to get a lowracer, highracer or fully
    > faired bike, but a SWB bike with a reasonably high BB and seat recline
    > will do much better in windy conditions. A LWB bicycle with a front
    > fairing can also perform well.
    >

    Well I know that some swb bikes have a lower frontage area, due to
    higher bb and more reclined seat. I experimented with a home-brew swb
    last winter. Due to my lack of knowledge of frame geometry it was a bit
    unstable, plus heavy steel frame made it weight in at over 40+pounds,
    and I had gearing problems as well. But OTOH I did get to ride it enough
    to appreciate the swb layout, which is my I inquired in an earlier post
    about swb bikes for beginners. I don't know much about fairings,except
    that I have read that they improve aerodynamic efficiency.

    > The used market may be the better alternative. Bikes such as the RANS
    > Rocket and Vision R-40 (1999 and later R-40's are better) are/were made
    > in relatively large quantities, and if not damaged by crashing or
    > abuse, will likely only require minor work to be fully functional.
    > There are other less common SWB models that occasionally show up on the
    > used market.
    >

    Well the lbs here that is a dealer for both SUN & CYCLE GENIUS
    supposedly also has some used models. I will inquire about them on
    Tuesday when I go for a test ride.

    > There are also some older LWB bikes (e.g. RANS Stratus, Easy Racers
    > Tour Easy) that may fall into your price range. Just be aware that
    > since these bikes were expensive when new, those selling for less than
    > $1,000 will be quite old. The main concern here will be that they might
    > be equipped with things like 6-speed freewheels, so upgrading to modern
    > drive trains could be expensive. And of course, with any older
    > bicycles, the frame should be inspected for signs of damage and fatigue
    > cracking. Also, these bicycles perform much better with front fairings,
    > so I would look for a used bike with the fairing included.
    >


    Thanks for the advise.

    Ken
    --
    [T]he bicycle is the most efficient machine ever created: Converting
    calories into gas, a bicycle gets the equivalent of three thousand miles
    per gallon. ~Bill Strickland, The Quotable Cyclist

    Homepage: http://kcm-home.tripod.com/
     
  16. Edward Dolan

    Edward Dolan Guest

    "Mike Rice" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    [...]
    > I liked the ride of the Sun Sport model, but didn't feel that I was
    > getting much of a noticable improvement over my old Shcwinn Varsity
    > (in terms of travel for effort expended in only one test ride, comfort
    > was certainly better on the Sun). The Tour Easy, though at least twice
    > as costly as the Sun, did feel like less effort than the Shcwinn and I
    > have no regrets about parting with the cash to get the bike I chose.
    >
    > Indiana Mike


    Recumbents are all about comfort for the vast majority of us. Speed is
    incidental. It is never fair to compare uprights with recumbents when it
    comes to the comfort factor.

    I continue to believe that uprights are faster than recumbents over all. The
    only time I was ever faster on any of my many recumbents was going downhill.
    If you aren't faster going uphill, you will eventually get dropped by
    uprights every time.

    I agree with you about the Tour Easy. The Varsity was an unbelievably heavy
    bike. Most recumbents are going to weigh around 30 pounds. I think that
    Varsity of yours weighed around 45 pounds!

    Regards,

    Ed Dolan - Minnesota
     
  17. Edward Dolan

    Edward Dolan Guest

    "Johnny Sunset" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    [...]
    > I am not suggesting that you need to get a lowracer, highracer or fully
    > faired bike, but a SWB bike with a reasonably high BB and seat recline
    > will do much better in windy conditions. A LWB bicycle with a front
    > fairing can also perform well.


    My main objection to SWB recumbents is that they do not handle as well as
    LWB. You can easily get into difficulties on a SWB that you can avoid on a
    LWB.

    I have often thought that for someone who is not a fanatic about cycling
    that a CLWB is the best choice. You will get some comfort and some handling
    ease. You will not be as fast as you would be on other configurations, but I
    am assuming that most who come to recumbents are not all that interested in
    being fast. If they are, then it is a whole different ball game.

    By the way, I have been on many week long bike tours that had quite a few
    Bike E's. They seemed to do just fine, but slower. But I do agree, it is not
    the optimum recumbent for long tours.

    Regards,

    Ed Dolan - Minnesota
     
  18. Slugger

    Slugger Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Edward
    Dolan <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Ken M" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Edward Dolan wrote:

    > [...]
    > >> By the way, I am very much in favor of a company like SUN. They make
    > >> recumbents that are not going to cost you an arm and a leg. Unless you
    > >> are into racing you do not need a light super fast recumbent. Let's face
    > >> it, most of us just ride our bikes around town for some fun and some
    > >> exercise. You need a $2000. recumbent to do this?
    > >>

    > > The model I test rode at the bike shop where I bought my latest diamond
    > > frame bike, I think it was a EZ-SPORT price tag was marked $1599.00 I
    > > thought that was a bit pricey for a first bike. My current price range is
    > > $500-$750 which, to me seems more reasonable for a first 'bent'.

    >
    > Ken, I can't believe the way prices of bikes have gone sky high in the past
    > 30 years or so. I got my first upright for a little over $100. (a very nice
    > French one). Now you have to pay at least several hundred in order to get a
    > fairly good upright bike.
    >
    > But recumbents exist in another universe than uprights. They are all just so
    > damn expensive. $500. - $750. is an excellent price point for recumbents.
    > Many on this group are into super expensive recumbents. Even I worked my way
    > up to a couple of $2000. recumbents, but I have a very bad conscience about
    > it.
    >
    > I have little respect for manufacturers who only know how to bring our very
    > expensive recumbents. I will save my respect and admiration for those
    > manufacturers who have the smarts to figure out how to bring out a recumbent
    > for a few hundred instead of a few thousand. I am of the opinion that any
    > dumbbell can bring out a recumbent if price is no object. The trick is to be
    > able to do it cheaply. That is why I rather like SUN. They have more smarts.
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Ed Dolan - Minnesota
    >



    This is basic economics 101.
    Supply and Demand. These small recumbent companies run a tight ship to
    stay afloat. They don't make many bikes so they must sell them at a
    high margin. Sun and Easy have worked out a great deal here that is
    beneficial to the entire industry. Cheap bents means more riders and
    more interested parties.

    Skip the EZ1 and go straight to the EZ-Sport. Its a champ and doesn't
    look like something that just came out of the welding shop class at the
    local highschool. Dolan is right, it does handle nice but its fugly.
     
  19. Mike Rice

    Mike Rice Guest

    On Mon, 02 Jan 2006 08:53:16 -0500, Ken M <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Mike Rice wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >> It doesn't hurt that Gardner Martin had worked out the basic geometry
    >> with the Easy Racer line for many years before creating the Sun line.
    >> Sun bikes are an import ine, aren't they? I imagine the price would be
    >> considerably higher if the bikes were built in the US.
    >>

    > From what I have read they are made in Asia somewhere. And yeah I would
    >think they would be considerable higher if they were made in the U.S.
    >
    >> I liked the ride of the Sun Sport model, but didn't feel that I was
    >> getting much of a noticable improvement over my old Shcwinn Varsity
    >> (in terms of travel for effort expended in only one test ride, comfort
    >> was certainly better on the Sun). The Tour Easy, though at least twice
    >> as costly as the Sun, did feel like less effort than the Shcwinn and I
    >> have no regrets about parting with the cash to get the bike I chose.
    >>

    >
    >Well that SPORT model did ride nice, but this being my first recumbent
    >purchase I think I would like to stick to something a little less
    >pricey, just in case I can't stand the bike. Not that I think that will
    >happen, but sometimes it's hard to tell on a relatively short "test
    >ride". Bike shops shop take a deposit, and then let you take the bike
    >home and ride it for a couple of days of something. I don't know of any
    >around here that do that though.
    >
    >Ken


    Ken. if you happen to be here now (6:18 pm EDT) there is a Sun Sport
    on E-bay closing in 15 minutes that is currently at $450.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Black-EZ-Sport-...207282907QQcategoryZ98084QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

    Indiana Mike
     
  20. Mike Rice

    Mike Rice Guest

    On Mon, 02 Jan 2006 23:19:57 GMT, Mike Rice <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mon, 02 Jan 2006 08:53:16 -0500, Ken M <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Mike Rice wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>
    >>> It doesn't hurt that Gardner Martin had worked out the basic geometry
    >>> with the Easy Racer line for many years before creating the Sun line.
    >>> Sun bikes are an import ine, aren't they? I imagine the price would be
    >>> considerably higher if the bikes were built in the US.
    >>>

    >> From what I have read they are made in Asia somewhere. And yeah I would
    >>think they would be considerable higher if they were made in the U.S.
    >>
    >>> I liked the ride of the Sun Sport model, but didn't feel that I was
    >>> getting much of a noticable improvement over my old Shcwinn Varsity
    >>> (in terms of travel for effort expended in only one test ride, comfort
    >>> was certainly better on the Sun). The Tour Easy, though at least twice
    >>> as costly as the Sun, did feel like less effort than the Shcwinn and I
    >>> have no regrets about parting with the cash to get the bike I chose.
    >>>

    >>
    >>Well that SPORT model did ride nice, but this being my first recumbent
    >>purchase I think I would like to stick to something a little less
    >>pricey, just in case I can't stand the bike. Not that I think that will
    >>happen, but sometimes it's hard to tell on a relatively short "test
    >>ride". Bike shops shop take a deposit, and then let you take the bike
    >>home and ride it for a couple of days of something. I don't know of any
    >>around here that do that though.
    >>
    >>Ken

    >
    >Ken. if you happen to be here now (6:18 pm EDT) there is a Sun Sport
    >on E-bay closing in 15 minutes that is currently at $450.
    >
    >http://cgi.ebay.com/Black-EZ-Sport-...207282907QQcategoryZ98084QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
    >
    >Indiana Mike


    Excuse me, it's at $415.

    Indiana Mike
     
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