Eskimos and ketosis?

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Matti Narkia, Oct 22, 2003.

  1. Mu_n Of Mars <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Fri, 24 Oct 2003 19:53:06 -0800, Floyd Davidson <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>That is an unwarranted assumption. The typical traditional
    >>Eskimo diet included significant vegetable matter. It's and urban myth
    >>that there are no plants where Eskimos live...

    >
    >Even fifth graders knew that.


    But many adults don't seem to be aware of it.

    >http://www2.grand-forks.k12.nd.us/ms/iditarod/inuitact.html


    That is an *extremely* impressive web page! It is well very
    done, and covers some truly interesting ground without making any
    significant errors. (The masks were *most* impressive.)

    It is really pleasant to see such an accurate portrayal of
    Eskimo culture, with emphasis on appropriate points and using
    information that teaches good lessons to children.

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://web.newsguy.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) [email protected]
     


  2. Mu_n Of Mars <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Fri, 24 Oct 2003 20:19:21 -0800, Floyd Davidson <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>"Al. Lohse" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>A little cultural sensitivity: They prefer to
    >>>be called Inuit.

    >>
    >>Only if they *are* Inuit, and not always then either.

    >
    >Many are and are desired to be called Native Americans.


    I'm not sure what your point is. Many Eskimos are *not* Inuit,
    and many Eskimos who are technically "Inuit" do not like to be
    called Inuit (as opposed, for example, to being called either
    Inupiat or Eskimos).

    Native American is a "coined" term, made up by the US Federal
    government to group all people indigenous to the US and its
    territories. Hence it include Hawaiians, American Samoans,
    Indians, Aleuts, and Eskimos (both Inupiat and Yupik).

    It also does *not* include the Inuit people of Canada or
    Greenland!

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://web.newsguy.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) [email protected]
     
  3. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

    Sat, 25 Oct 2003 11:16:38 GMT in article
    <[email protected]> Matti Narkia
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Fri, 24 Oct 2003 19:53:06 -0800 in article <[email protected]> Floyd
    >Davidson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Matti Narkia <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>[email protected] (James) wrote:
    >>>>Matti Narkia <[email protected]>:
    >>>>> Robert Matthews writes in the article
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The burning question
    >>>>> The Sydney Morning Herald, October 23, 2003
    >>>>> http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/10/22/1066631499123.html
    >>>>>
    >>>>> as > This brings up an interesting question: Eskimos ate huge amounts of fat and
    >>>>> considerable amount of protein from seal and fish, and very little
    >>>>> carbohydrates, so they must have been in ketosis all the time. Why this

    >>
    >>That is an unwarranted assumption. The typical traditional
    >>Eskimo diet included significant vegetable matter. It's and urban myth
    >>that there are no plants where Eskimos live...
    >>

    >Well, in the correspondence article
    >
    >Westman EC.
    > Is dietary carbohydrate essential for human nutrition?
    >Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 May;75(5):951-3
    >http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/75/5/951-a
    >
    >the author writes:
    >
    > "....Few contemporary human cultures eat low-carbohydrate diets, but
    > the traditional Eskimo diet is very low (50 g/d) in carbohydrate
    > (2). ..."
    >
    >That's right at the ketosis threshold stated by Westman in the same article
    >and below the ketosis threshold defined in _The Ketogenic Diet by Lyle
    >McDonald_ page 73 (the latter threshold from Susan's message in this ng).
    >Having said that I'm not sure what effect, if any, the amount of protein
    >consumed by Eskimos has in these thresholds.
    >

    Note that, my above comment about low carbohydrate content of traditional
    Eskimo diet is not necessarily in contradiction with Floyd Davidson's
    comment about Eskimo diet including significant vegetable matter, because
    unlike grains or even fruit, most vegetables don't contain that many grams
    of carbohydrate per serving.

    --
    Matti Narkia
     
  4. Mu_n Of Mars

    Mu_n Of Mars Guest


    >>>That is an unwarranted assumption. The typical traditional
    >>>Eskimo diet included significant vegetable matter. It's and urban myth
    >>>that there are no plants where Eskimos live...

    >>
    >>Even fifth graders knew that.


    On Sat, 25 Oct 2003 07:57:27 -0800, Floyd Davidson <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >But many adults don't seem to be aware of it.
    >
    >>http://www2.grand-forks.k12.nd.us/ms/iditarod/inuitact.html

    >
    >That is an *extremely* impressive web page! It is well very
    >done, and covers some truly interesting ground without making any
    >significant errors. (The masks were *most* impressive.)


    Yes, I got my (re)education on the Native American (Indian) population
    when I was told the story by a close friend about the signing of the
    UTA treaty by the Indians of alaska, how they literally had to slop
    through the snow to find the elders for original signatures, etc.

    >It is really pleasant to see such an accurate portrayal of
    >Eskimo culture, with emphasis on appropriate points and using
    >information that teaches good lessons to children.


    Yes, it is and was.

    http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap031024.html
    Lift well, Eat less, Walk fast, Live long.
     
  5. Mu_n Of Mars

    Mu_n Of Mars Guest

    On Sat, 25 Oct 2003 08:02:35 -0800, Floyd Davidson <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >>Many are and are desired to be called Native Americans.

    >
    >I'm not sure what your point is. Many Eskimos are *not* Inuit,
    >and many Eskimos who are technically "Inuit" do not like to be
    >called Inuit (as opposed, for example, to being called either
    >Inupiat or Eskimos).
    >
    >Native American is a "coined" term, made up by the US Federal
    >government to group all people indigenous to the US and its
    >territories. Hence it include Hawaiians, American Samoans,
    >Indians, Aleuts, and Eskimos (both Inupiat and Yupik).


    Yes, true, and the term is supported by the BIA. Many Indians I have
    met, especially in the last six months, resent the word "Indian"
    because of the Tonto/savage image it can hold.

    >It also does *not* include the Inuit people of Canada or
    >Greenland!


    Correct or many other areas like th Philippines and the Caribbean.

    http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap031024.html
    Lift well, Eat less, Walk fast, Live long.
     
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