European food cultures

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by The Reids, Apr 3, 2005.

  1. Edmund Lewis

    Edmund Lewis Guest

    The Reids wrote:
    > Following up to Edmund Lewis
    >
    > >Chips I suppose still keep the potato dominant to some extent. But I
    > >agree it's rare to have them as the only carb (chip butties, lasagne
    > >and chips anyone?).

    >
    > Did you type what you meant?


    What do you think I meant? I'm confused.

    > > also
    > >> as accompaniments with rice- but rarely the main thing. I suppose

    the
    > >> potato probably still dominates in the UK, but I wonder if that

    isn't
    > >> changing...

    > >
    > >Mention "potato" to me and I think tasteless boiled things beloved

    of
    > >school caterers. (Love the baked and roasted ones though)

    >
    > but get a quality potato like a pink fir apple and boiled
    > potatoes are a wonderful thing.



    Edmund
     


  2. On Mon, 04 Apr 2005 17:41:23 +0100, The Reids
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Following up to Deep Foiled Malls
    >


    >>and here's what happens if you eat too much of it:
    >>http://deepfriedmars.com/OddPics/PizzaChampion.JPG

    >
    >Fatness isn't a particularly UK feature :)


    That photo was a bit cruel. I don't think he was British anyway, as he
    didnt tell me to bugger off.

    >>Also seen in Greenwich, these delightful ones:
    >>http://deepfriedmars.com/OddPics/Prawnies1.JPG
    >>http://deepfriedmars.com/OddPics/Prawnies2.JPG
    >>
    >>Not actual prawns, but bits of the fish of the day, mashed up,
    >>coloured, flavoured and squeezed into a prawn-ish shape.

    >
    >I have walked past those a couple of times, hadn't realised they
    >were not prawns.


    I suspect few do until it's too late.

    >In the market proper there is plenty of quality
    >food, but you didn't photo that? There's also an (overpriced)
    >French style restaurant 100 metres away and at least a couple of
    >pubs with perfectly reasonable food. The Yacht, The Trafalgar or
    >The Greenwich Union (I have not tried the Union, but its supposed
    >to be good, sourcing its food from the specialist food outlets in
    >the immediate area.


    We went to the Trafalgar, and it was reasonable. Not photoworthy, but
    not too bad. I had the fish (not cod, but something else), and it was
    drowned in some mysterious (but tasty) sauce with green flecs in it,
    and it had not been filleted properly. The chips on the side were
    ridiculously big and undercooked for my liking.

    The beer was excellent though.
    --
    ---
    DFM - http://www.deepfriedmars.com
    ---
    --
     
  3. yaofeng

    yaofeng Guest

    I am 52 and my BMI is 26. Of course a BMI of 24 is my goal but have
    been trying to get there for a few years without sucess. I believe
    metabolism and heredity play important part in your BMI in addition to
    diet. My sons and duaghter are all thin no matter how much they eat.
    I was the same way in my younger days. I don't go "all you can eat"
    anymore because I have no will power and felt sick afterward, everytime.
     
  4. Alan S

    Alan S Guest

    On Mon, 04 Apr 2005 19:39:26 +0200, Donna Evleth <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    |I am sad to report that there seem to be more and more restaurants (usually
    |the cheap ones) here in France that advertise "buffet à volonté" (all you
    |can eat from the buffet). However, in real life, I have not yet seen people
    |go back to the buffet more than seconds.
    |
    |Donna Evleth
    |>

    When you are both on diets, and are used to sharing a single main
    course for that reason anyway, "all you can eat" buffets become
    extravagantly expensive - in health terms as well as cash.


    Cheers, Alan, Australia
     
  5. dgs

    dgs Guest

    yaofeng wrote:

    > Yes. Brazil is one country "all you can eat" is alive and well. The
    > Churiscaria turns my stomach.


    Don't know why. They can be good places if you know how to maintain
    control, just like any place with all-you-care-to-eat food.

    > But it is not nearly as popular as in
    > the US.


    It's starting to catch on though. There are churrascarias in some
    of the bigger American cities; I've been to the Plataforma in New York.
    There are others scattered around the country.

    > Here there are Chinese, Japanese, Spanish, Portugese, you name
    > it. You can eat all.


    Haven't yet found a Portuguese "AYCE" place yet. Nor Spanish. Mexican,
    yes; avoid like the plague. Chinese and Indian "AYCE" are quite common
    in the USA. But I've also had Indian "AYCE" buffets in the UK.

    Another spin on "AYCE" would be the Heurigen in Vienna. Food is taken
    from a buffet table, to go with the young wine. You eat, you drink,
    you get full, you get drunk. Then you go for a nice walk afterwards to
    clear your head.
    --
    dgs
     
  6. yaofeng

    yaofeng Guest

    Go to the Iron Bound section in Newark, Jersey. Most of the
    Portugese/Spanish restaurants offer Rodizio, the all you can eat BBQ.
    Even if you don't try the AYCE BBQ, the paella is far better than
    anywhere else you get, certainly far better than Spain or in the UK.
     
  7. All you can eat restaurants are popular in Japan. I've seen
    all-you-can-eat sushi, shabu-shabu, sukiyaki, and yakiniku. These
    restaurants are a great bargain for the average American, since
    Japanese tend to have small appetites and the prices reflect this.
     
  8. "You can certainly get poor food in the West End. The down market
    food places are still not good enough, but in the West End why
    are all the tourists buying it? Go to the restaurant area where
    people like me eat (100 metres away) around Charlotte Street and
    take some photos there!"

    Too many tourists buy into the stereotype of British food being
    terrible, and assume there isn't anything beyond pub food, tourist
    traps, and downmarket Chinese and Indian. Many people who carefully
    plan where they will eat each meal in Paris or Hong Kong are willing to
    just go anywhere in London. I think London is one of the better
    European cities for restaurants if you have at least a moderate budget
    and really know where to go...London is the most international city in
    Europe and the restaurants reflect that, and there are also a lot of
    options in the way of fusion and contemporary cuisine.
     
  9. On 4 Apr 2005 20:18:13 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

    >"You can certainly get poor food in the West End. The down market
    >food places are still not good enough, but in the West End why
    >are all the tourists buying it? Go to the restaurant area where
    >people like me eat (100 metres away) around Charlotte Street and
    >take some photos there!"
    >
    >Too many tourists buy into the stereotype of British food being
    >terrible, and assume there isn't anything beyond pub food, tourist
    >traps, and downmarket Chinese and Indian. Many people who carefully
    >plan where they will eat each meal in Paris or Hong Kong are willing to
    >just go anywhere in London.


    Huh??? That is a bizarre statement!

    >I think London is one of the better
    >European cities for restaurants if you have at least a moderate budget
    >and really know where to go...London is the most international city in
    >Europe and the restaurants reflect that, and there are also a lot of
    >options in the way of fusion and contemporary cuisine.


    Doesn't alter the fact that the produce they use is usually shite. You
    can prepare food as carefully as you like, but cheap ingredients will
    always shine through in the end result, and few restaurants are
    prepared to go to the effort of finding decent produce. It might exist
    in London, but is just too hard to come across.
    --
    ---
    DFM - http://www.deepfriedmars.com
    ---
    --
     
  10. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to Donna Evleth

    >> http://www.fellwalk.co.uk/borough.htm"

    >
    >That looks like a lot of our markets here. Like our local favorite, the
    >Marché Saint Germain.


    we just need more of them, like the number there are in Spain.
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  11. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to Icono Clast

    >No, it doesn't. Improper eating leads to obese people. I frequent
    >buffets and eat enormous quantities.


    for most people eating enormous quantities will lead to obesity,
    its simple, calories in v calories out. What is "improper
    eating"?
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  12. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to Edmund Lewis

    >> >Chips I suppose still keep the potato dominant to some extent. But I
    >> >agree it's rare to have them as the only carb (chip butties, lasagne
    >> >and chips anyone?).

    >>
    >> Did you type what you meant?

    >
    >What do you think I meant? I'm confused.


    I'll set out what I think for clarity!
    In UK potato is dominant carbohydrate and will normally be the
    only one, if another carb is used (say rice) the potato
    disappears. I have never actually seen a chip buttie, although
    i'm sure poor people eat them to fill up, at least in the past.

    Some people might have chips with lasagne, but thats an
    aberation. Appreciation of food is fairly new to the UK and like
    the US, food has changed drastically over the last 30 years. It
    hasnt reached the bottom of the pile yet, hence Jamie Oliver and
    his school dinners campaign.
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  13. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to yaofeng

    > the paella is far better than
    >anywhere else you get, certainly far better than Spain


    Really? Could you describe it more?
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  14. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to Deep Foiled Malls

    >>Fatness isn't a particularly UK feature :)

    >
    >That photo was a bit cruel. I don't think he was British anyway, as he
    >didnt tell me to bugger off.


    A Scot would have laid you out, just swearing at tourists with
    cameras is for wussies.

    >We went to the Trafalgar, and it was reasonable. Not photoworthy, but
    >not too bad. I had the fish (not cod, but something else), and it was
    >drowned in some mysterious (but tasty) sauce with green flecs in it,


    So whats wrong with that? Are you saying they dont do sauces in
    France?

    >and it had not been filleted properly. The chips on the side were
    >ridiculously big and undercooked for my liking.


    Big chips are in fashion at the moment and it reduces the fat to
    food ratio.

    >The beer was excellent though.


    Glad youre one of the few foreigners able to apppreciate good
    beer.
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  15. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to [email protected]

    >and assume there isn't anything beyond pub food


    and of course quite a few pubs are taking the food upmarket,
    although thats not so much a London thing where pubs are not hit
    by drink/drive issues.
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  16. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to Deep Foiled Malls

    >Doesn't alter the fact that the produce they use is usually shite.


    That's rubbish. There is nothing wrong with British produce,
    enough gets exported to France and Spain, its preparation where
    it might fall down.
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  17. The Reids <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Following up to yaofeng
    >
    > > the paella is far better than
    > >anywhere else you get, certainly far better than Spain

    >
    > Really? Could you describe it more?


    There is a Spanish restaurant in Cambridge MA (run by a Cuban!) that
    served a better paella than I've ever had in Spain. I don't think that
    it's on the menu anymore- he said it was too much hassle to make! (My
    partner was a waiter at the restaurant a long long time ago.) I've just
    never had much luck with paella in Spain. Even in restaurants that
    otherwise served very good food IMO, the Paella was disappointing. I've
    preferred things like arroz negro when I've had it.

    --
    David Horne- www.davidhorne.net
    usenet (at) davidhorne (dot) co (dot) uk
     
  18. Des Small

    Des Small Guest

    The Reids <[email protected]> writes:

    > I have never actually seen a chip buttie, although i'm sure poor
    > people eat them to fill up, at least in the past.


    I used to, as a student ("poor person"). They're actually very nice!

    Des
     
  19. Icono Clast

    Icono Clast Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I think London is one of the better European cities for
    > restaurants if you have at least a moderate budget and really know
    > where to go...


    It is extremely difficult for tourists to "really know where to go".

    One night in Italy we decided it was time to eat and entered the
    corner restaurant to be given the last two available seats at a table
    in company with a couple of Italians and French. They told us it was
    the best restaurant in town (I think it was Firenze).

    We certainly did have a good meal, the cost was modest and, on
    departure, there was a mob outside seeking to gain entry.

    What's "a moderate budget"?
    ____________________________________________________________
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  20. On Tue, 05 Apr 2005 11:15:37 +0100, The Reids wrote:

    > I have never actually seen a chip buttie, although
    > i'm sure poor people eat them to fill up, at least in the past.


    They're brilliant. Especially when the butter runs down your wrist as you
    eat it. On a par, if not better than sausage, bacon and fried-egg butties.
    --
    Tim C.
     
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