European food cultures

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by The Reids, Apr 3, 2005.

  1. yaofeng

    yaofeng Guest

    There is only one word to describe the paella in Spain, atrocious.
    This is after having paella's in the iron Bound section of Newrak, New
    Jersey.
     


  2. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "yaofeng" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > There is only one word to describe the paella in Spain, atrocious.
    > This is after having paella's in the iron Bound section of Newrak, New
    > Jersey.


    They have terrific Portuguese food there. Very well known for it.

    nancy
     
  3. yaofeng

    yaofeng Guest

    Check a few ones out in the Ironbound section of Newark, New Jersey.

    http://www.iberiarestaurants.com/

    http://www.goironbound.com/html/dining/spanish.htm

    It has a sizable contingent from Spain, Brazil and Portugal. Most
    would agree the paella there is better than what you get in Spain.
    I've never had better paella elsewhere.

    I even had feijoada in one of the Brazilain restaurant there. You
    won't find too many Brazialian restaurants in the US. Out of those
    even fewer serve Feijoada. The one I went in Ironbound does it only on
    weekends.
     
  4. "Most would agree the paella there is better than what you get in
    Spain."

    That's if you don't know where to go in Spain or only go to tourist
    restaurants.

    I had great food in all parts of Spain, including paella, and I was
    travelling on a minimal budget. Not to say that there aren't some very
    good Spanish restaurants in the US, but I haven't found anything quite
    up to the Spanish level.

    "I even had feijoada in one of the Brazilain restaurant there. You
    won't find too many Brazialian restaurants in the US. Out of those
    even fewer serve Feijoada. The one I went in Ironbound does it only on
    weekends."

    Most of the Brazilian restaurants in the US specialize in barbecued
    meat, and some only serve barbecued meat. I've had more diverse
    Brazilian cuisine like moqueca and feijoada, but only in New York and
    Miami (I assume you can also get it in Boston and Newark). Bahian
    cuisine is almost impossible to find in the US.
     
  5. yaofeng

    yaofeng Guest

    I have no complain about food in Spain, actually I agree with you on
    good food in Spain in general, with the exception of paella. As for
    Bahian food, I am still looking for aracaje in the US. But in my
    experience aracaje in Rio doesn't even taste quite like the ones I had
    in Salvador, Bahia.
     
  6. On Tue, 05 Apr 2005 11:15:39 +0100, The Reids
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Following up to Deep Foiled Malls


    >>We went to the Trafalgar, and it was reasonable. Not photoworthy, but
    >>not too bad. I had the fish (not cod, but something else), and it was
    >>drowned in some mysterious (but tasty) sauce with green flecs in it,

    >
    >So whats wrong with that? Are you saying they dont do sauces in
    >France?


    Erm... I live in Italy. Similar, but different.

    >>and it had not been filleted properly. The chips on the side were
    >>ridiculously big and undercooked for my liking.

    >
    >Big chips are in fashion at the moment and it reduces the fat to
    >food ratio.


    They need to be cooked at a high temperature to reduce the fat
    absorbtion and increase the crispiness. For the best chips, look no
    further that Belgium. Somehow they get them just right.

    >>The beer was excellent though.

    >
    >Glad youre one of the few foreigners able to apppreciate good
    >beer.


    Somehow I learnt the art of enjoying what the rest of the world laughs
    at. Only in England.
    --
    ---
    DFM - http://www.deepfriedmars.com
    ---
    --
     
  7. Mark Hewitt

    Mark Hewitt Guest

    "The Reids" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I have never actually seen a chip buttie, although
    > i'm sure poor people eat them to fill up, at least in the past.


    You are joking?! Chip butties are gorgeous! I always make sure I have some
    bread whenever having chips :)
     
  8. Ophelia

    Ophelia Guest

    "Mark Hewitt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "The Reids" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> I have never actually seen a chip buttie, although
    >> i'm sure poor people eat them to fill up, at least in the past.

    >
    > You are joking?! Chip butties are gorgeous! I always make sure I have some
    > bread whenever having chips :)


    So does my better half. I think he is incapable of eating chips without
    bread:)
    >
    >
     
  9. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to Tim Challenger

    >> I have never actually seen a chip buttie, although
    >> i'm sure poor people eat them to fill up, at least in the past.

    >
    >They're brilliant. Especially when the butter runs down your wrist as you
    >eat it. On a par, if not better than sausage, bacon and fried-egg butties.


    nothings better than a fry up in a sandwich!
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  10. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to yaofeng

    >There is only one word to describe the paella in Spain, atrocious.


    In a tourist restaurant away from the part of Spain it belongs,
    sometimes less than perfect. A Spanish restaurateur said the
    same. But I have rarely had *any* "atrocious" food in Spain.
    My most enjoyable arroz was in a little locals bar in the paddy
    fields of the Ebro delta, a simple abanda. If they cant cook
    rice, who can? Outside Spain people often stir the rice, making
    it more like Rissotto.
    In my experience "foreign" restaurants (include parts of Spain in
    that) only do a paella de mariscos, does this NY place do other
    types?
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  11. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to Deep Foiled Malls

    >>So whats wrong with that? Are you saying they dont do sauces in
    >>France?

    >
    >Erm... I live in Italy. Similar, but different.


    Sorry, misremembered, but France is rated quite well for food.

    >They need to be cooked at a high temperature to reduce the fat
    >absorbtion and increase the crispiness. For the best chips, look no
    >further that Belgium. Somehow they get them just right.


    lots of practice.

    >>>The beer was excellent though.

    >>
    >>Glad youre one of the few foreigners able to apppreciate good
    >>beer.

    >
    >Somehow I learnt the art of enjoying what the rest of the world laughs
    >at. Only in England.


    Why the rest of the world thinks fizzy, freezing sweet lager is
    good, I cannot understand, except that the beer matches a cool
    climate and lager a hot one, maybe).
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  12. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to Deep Foiled Malls

    >>That's rubbish. There is nothing wrong with British produce,
    >>enough gets exported to France and Spain, its preparation where
    >>it might fall down.

    >
    >How can the British afford to export any primary produce with the
    >value of the pound?


    because the French and spanish think the seafood is worth paying
    for? You see Spanish lorries loading at the keyside in the
    Hebrides, given the prices in Spain, how does it work for them?
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  13. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to Icono Clast

    >> I think London is one of the better European cities for
    >> restaurants if you have at least a moderate budget and really know
    >> where to go...

    >
    >It is extremely difficult for tourists to "really know where to go".


    Do what I do, as a local, read guides to supplement local
    knowledge.

    >One night in Italy we decided it was time to eat and entered the
    >corner restaurant to be given the last two available seats at a table
    >in company with a couple of Italians and French. They told us it was
    >the best restaurant in town (I think it was Firenze).
    >
    >We certainly did have a good meal, the cost was modest and, on
    >departure, there was a mob outside seeking to gain entry.


    I don't think anyone is claiming the average restro in Italy
    isn't better than the average in UK. Italy is possibly world
    best.
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  14. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to Mark Hewitt

    >> I have never actually seen a chip buttie, although
    >> i'm sure poor people eat them to fill up, at least in the past.

    >
    >You are joking?!


    no, never seen one.
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  15. Icono Clast

    Icono Clast Guest

    Arri London wrote:
    > The Reids wrote:
    >> Icono Clast said:
    >>> Improper eating leads to obese people. I frequent buffets and
    >>> eat enormous quantities.

    >>
    >> for most people eating enormous quantities will lead to obesity,
    >> its simple, calories in v calories out. What is "improper
    >> eating"?

    >
    > To put it mathematically:
    >
    > calories in >> calories out = improper eating


    Improper eating isn't what I really mean by "improper eating" as it
    might cause obesity but it can also be eating that fails to provide
    proper nutrition. One can eat foods that don't cause weight-gain
    while also failing to provide proper nutrition.

    I'll strive for greater clarity in future.

    The formula should really read:
    calories in >> calories out = excess weight (fat or obesity, etc.)


    >> What is "improper eating"?


    12/28/2004 02:34
    [Bruno's] <http://www.brunoslive.com/> used to have
    good food (now it's all deep fried and, therefore, inedible for any
    but the narrow-arteried obese) but it has good music.


    1/21/2005 03:57
    [The restaurant has been at the same location for a very long time]

    Cajun cuisine so good that it qualifies as a fair value but just barely.

    We had an excellent appetizer of Asparagus; I had the Sole Stuffed
    with Crab, she the Blackened Salmon. We shared a glass of wine; she
    had a cuppa coffee.

    The reason we had the asparagus appetizer was because when I asked
    "what comes with that?" vegetables were not included. This is a
    matter that bothers me as restaurants should provide the basics of a
    balanced and healthful meal especially when the tab with toke is $80.

    Vegetable-free meals are becoming so common that I often have some
    for a pre-bed snack or as part of the next day's breakfast. This is
    not a good thing.
    ____________________________________________________________
    A San Francisco gourmand: "You serve it, I'll eat it!"


    11/15/2004 01:45
    Sarah Banick wrote:
    > [Cola producers use] different formulas around the world, modified
    > to the market. If you ever make it to the . . . Museum in Atlanta
    > (don't make a special trip), they have a tasting room with
    > concoctions from all their different countries.


    I doubt that I've ever had a full portion of the stuff at one sitting
    in my life. I consider it, and other cola drinks, to be vile,
    unhealthful, swill that ought not be available to any non-adult.
    Nevertheless, at the advertisement for which you have to pay in
    Atlanta, there are probably more than a dozen versions of the stuff.
    I tasted many, if not most, of them and was astonished at the
    differences. Some, to US taste, are undrinkable.

    Pete nospam wrote:
    > And if you want to have some fun with them, ask when they started
    > to remove cocaine from [their soda]. When [it] first was created,
    > it had a measurable amount of cocaine remaining in it. Not
    > enough to do much, but it was measurable.


    I did ask and the answer was unblinkingly instantaneous. I think it
    was 1902 but am not sure.
    ______________________________________________________________
    A San Francisco glutton who says: "You serve it, I'll eat it!"


    3/15/2005 03:46
    Mxsmanic wrote:
    > if you live alone and have to work for a living, you don't always
    > have a lot of time to spend on food preparation.


    Doesn't have t'take "a lot of time".

    A few weeks ago I prepared about a litre (I guess) of lentils with
    rice and froze the lot in portion-size containers. Warms up nicely
    and is one of the best sources of protein on the planet.

    I believe tofu is a good source of protein that can probably be
    enhanced by combining it with something complementary.

    [Tofo is a complete protein that doesn't need a complement.]

    My corner grocery sells hot-off-the-spit chicken for about U$4.50 and
    throws in shredded cabbage, green and red hot sauces, tomato slices,
    carrots, and chiles jalapeƱos. I always tell myself to "save half for
    tomorrow" but I always devour the whole thing at one sitting, maybe
    two or three of 'em a month.

    There are many inexpensive cuts of meat that are good sources of
    protein. I particularly like chuck steak.

    Also in the freezer is a whole buncha patties I made of ground turkey
    that fry nicely to become tasty burgers.

    I avoid prepared packaged foods (haven't bought any in memory) as
    they're usually high in salt, sugar, and/or fat and aren't very
    healthful. They also contain preservatives and other chemicals that
    might not be good to ingest in considerable quantity.

    My life-long diet has consisted mostly of healthful foods properly
    prepared. Of course I eat junk food and stuff that contains a lot of
    unhealthful stuff but it's rare. The advantage of rarely having such
    foods is that they're an extremely enjoyable treat.

    I'm not a food freak; I believe that eating a wide variety of foods
    provides all the nutrition one needs. I'm an old man. I do not have
    any problems with weight (my Body Mass Index is lower than 25), I
    take no pills, have no ills (in spite of smoking for longer than
    fifty years have lung capacity measured to be equivalent to a man
    aged 21) have blood pressure well below any reported danger level, a
    cholesterol count at the maximum of OK, and often hear young dancers
    say they "hope I'm as energetic as you when I'm your age".

    I attribute it all to how I eat. My only eating "problem" is that I
    consume enormous quantities -- buffets lose money when I visit. I'll
    probably die tomorrow.
    ______________________________________________________________
    A San Francisco glutton who says: "You serve it, I'll eat it!"
    http://geocities.com/dancefest/ http://geocities.com/iconoc/
    ICQ: http://wwp.mirabilis.com/19098103 IClast at SFbay Net
     
  16. On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 04:26:52 -0700, Icono Clast wrote:

    >> calories in >> calories out = improper eating

    >
    > Improper eating isn't what I really mean by "improper eating" as it
    > might cause obesity but it can also be eating that fails to provide
    > proper nutrition. One can eat foods that don't cause weight-gain
    > while also failing to provide proper nutrition.
    >
    > I'll strive for greater clarity in future.


    But don't go as far as Mixi, please! ;-)
    --
    Tim C.
     
  17. Mark Hewitt

    Mark Hewitt Guest

    "The Reids" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > Following up to Mark Hewitt
    >
    >>> I have never actually seen a chip buttie, although
    >>> i'm sure poor people eat them to fill up, at least in the past.

    >>
    >>You are joking?!

    >
    > no, never seen one.


    Put that right today. Get some chips, and some bread!
     
  18. Pablo

    Pablo Guest

    "Tim Challenger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Tue, 05 Apr 2005 11:15:37 +0100, The Reids wrote:
    >
    >> I have never actually seen a chip buttie, although
    >> i'm sure poor people eat them to fill up, at least in the past.

    >
    > They're brilliant. Especially when the butter runs down your wrist as you
    > eat it. On a par, if not better than sausage, bacon and fried-egg butties.
    > --
    > Tim C.

    *
    I've only heard the term from perhaps the best source of British pop
    culture --reruns of "Keeping Up Appearances."

    A typical utterance from Onslow during his breakfast beer: I could murder a
    bacon butty right about now!

    Pablo
    (Basking in the merits of educational television )
    ; )
     
  19. Mark Hewitt <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "The Reids" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]
    > > Following up to Mark Hewitt
    > >
    > >>> I have never actually seen a chip buttie, although
    > >>> i'm sure poor people eat them to fill up, at least in the past.
    > >>
    > >>You are joking?!

    > >
    > > no, never seen one.

    >
    > Put that right today. Get some chips, and some bread!


    Wot, no sauce?! :)

    --
    David Horne- www.davidhorne.net
    usenet (at) davidhorne (dot) co (dot) uk
     
  20. Edmund Lewis

    Edmund Lewis Guest

    >
    > I'll set out what I think for clarity!
    > In UK potato is dominant carbohydrate and will normally be the
    > only one, if another carb is used (say rice) the potato
    > disappears. I have never actually seen a chip buttie,


    Crikey! How can you live in the UK for umpteen years and not......

    although
    > i'm sure poor people eat them to fill up, at least in the past.
    > Some people might have chips with lasagne, but thats an
    > aberation.

    Why? I'm pretty sure I've seen rice with shepherd's pie too. Even
    "non-traditional" food gets in on the act, eg curry with rice AND naan
    bread.
    Appreciation of food is fairly new to the UK

    I think it was appreciated to some extent pre-industrial Revolution, at
    least among the more well-to-do. However I think what we are seeing is
    a re-emergence of that appreciation.

    and like
    > the US, food has changed drastically over the last 30 years. It
    > hasnt reached the bottom of the pile yet, hence Jamie Oliver and
    > his school dinners campaign.


    Came 25 years too late for me :)

    Edmund
     
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