European food cultures

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by The Reids, Apr 3, 2005.

  1. Pablo wrote:

    > "Tim Challenger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > On Tue, 05 Apr 2005 11:15:37 +0100, The Reids wrote:
    > >
    > >> I have never actually seen a chip buttie, although
    > >> i'm sure poor people eat them to fill up, at least in the past.

    > >
    > > They're brilliant. Especially when the butter runs down your wrist

    > as you
    > > eat it. On a par, if not better than sausage, bacon and fried-egg

    > butties.
    > > --
    > > Tim C.

    > *
    > I've only heard the term from perhaps the best source of British pop
    > culture --reruns of "Keeping Up Appearances."
    >
    > A typical utterance from Onslow during his breakfast beer: I could
    > murder a
    > bacon butty right about now!


    I actually had to have the "nice bit o' crumpet" comment from "Are you
    being served?" explained to me.
    ---
    JL

    >
    >
    > Pablo
    > (Basking in the merits of educational television )
    > ; )
     


  2. On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 11:13:16 +0100, The Reids
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Following up to yaofeng
    >
    >>There is only one word to describe the paella in Spain, atrocious.

    >
    >In a tourist restaurant away from the part of Spain it belongs,
    >sometimes less than perfect. A Spanish restaurateur said the
    >same. But I have rarely had *any* "atrocious" food in Spain.


    *resists like hell in passing comment once again on the English's
    pallet*
    --
    ---
    DFM - http://www.deepfriedmars.com
    ---
    --
     
  3. Icono Clast

    Icono Clast Guest

    The Reids wrote:
    > Icono Clast said:
    >>It is extremely difficult for tourists to "really know where to go".

    >
    > Do what I do, as a local, read guides to supplement local knowledge.


    I've read many a guide for San Francisco and find the information so
    fallacious that I don't trust guides for places of which my ignorance
    is total.

    The San Francisco Sights page
    <http://geocities.com/iconoc/Articles/Sights.html> at the site at
    Right in the sig contains the following paragraph:

    << CAVEAT EMPTOR
    << Commercial sites and publications should be regarded with extreme
    skepticism because they are more likely to recommend those who
    advertise with them, regardless of quality, in preference to The Best
    who mightn't advertise with them. Further, such sites and
    publications might not have what you seek only because they do not
    pay to be mentioned. You are advised, regardless of where you travel,
    to ask local people about commercial sites' and publications'
    recommendations. >>
    ____________________________________________________________
    Un San Francisqueño en San Francisco
    http://geocities.com/dancefest/ http://geocities.com/iconoc/
    ICQ: http://wwp.mirabilis.com/19098103 IClast at SFbay Net
     
  4. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    Icono Clast wrote:
    >
    > Arri London wrote:
    > > The Reids wrote:
    > >> Icono Clast said:
    > >>> Improper eating leads to obese people. I frequent buffets and
    > >>> eat enormous quantities.
    > >>
    > >> for most people eating enormous quantities will lead to obesity,
    > >> its simple, calories in v calories out. What is "improper
    > >> eating"?

    > >
    > > To put it mathematically:
    > >
    > > calories in >> calories out = improper eating

    >
    > Improper eating isn't what I really mean by "improper eating" as it
    > might cause obesity but it can also be eating that fails to provide
    > proper nutrition. One can eat foods that don't cause weight-gain
    > while also failing to provide proper nutrition.


    All foods cause weight gain if too much is eaten. But the point about
    nutrition is correct too.

    >
    > I'll strive for greater clarity in future.


    LOL yes indeed.
    >
    > The formula should really read:
    > calories in >> calories out = excess weight (fat or obesity, etc.)



    Proper eating is both things: correct calorie intake and correct
    nutrition.
     
  5. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to Mark Hewitt

    >>>You are joking?!

    >>
    >> no, never seen one.

    >
    >Put that right today. Get some chips, and some bread!


    got close yesterday, "chicken toasted sandwich with chips", I
    went for belly of pork with sweet potato mash.
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  6. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to Edmund Lewis

    > I have never actually seen a chip buttie,
    >
    >Crikey! How can you live in the UK for umpteen years and not......


    56 years, not a sniff of one :)

    >Why? I'm pretty sure I've seen rice with shepherd's pie too.


    Haven't seen that either! My mother in law did potatoes with it
    though (once).

    >Even "non-traditional" food gets in on the act, eg curry with rice AND naan
    >bread.


    That's about learning the sub culture isn't it.

    > Appreciation of food is fairly new to the UK


    this is true

    >I think it was appreciated to some extent pre-industrial Revolution, at
    >least among the more well-to-do. However I think what we are seeing is
    >a re-emergence of that appreciation.


    There are books written on it, the causes are legion. Protestant
    work culture, WW2 and rationing, anglo saxon culture, anti
    catholicism, anti eurpoeanism, early industrialisation and so on.
    Certainly, somehow, by victorian times, the young Mrs Beeton was
    in position to write her definitive book setting in stone the
    bad practises of her times. They are now almost gone, but while
    some people used mass foreign travel to open their eyes to the
    mistakes of the immediate past, some adopted the new convenience
    foods that have led to Saint Jamie Olivers crusade on modern
    school dinners.

    > and like
    >> the US, food has changed drastically over the last 30 years. It
    >> hasnt reached the bottom of the pile yet, hence Jamie Oliver and
    >> his school dinners campaign.

    >
    >Came 25 years too late for me :)


    Sounds like your mum cooked like mine :)
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  7. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to Deep Foiled Malls

    >>In a tourist restaurant away from the part of Spain it belongs,
    >>sometimes less than perfect. A Spanish restaurateur said the
    >>same. But I have rarely had *any* "atrocious" food in Spain.

    >
    >*resists like hell in passing comment once again on the English's
    >pallet*


    I don't understand? What has UK got to do with paella?
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  8. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to Icono Clast

    ><< Commercial sites and publications should be regarded with extreme
    >skepticism because they are more likely to recommend those who
    >advertise with them, regardless of quality,


    Avoid guides that accept paid entries and advertising, The CAMRA
    guide for instance, does not.
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  9. On Fri, 08 Apr 2005 09:59:24 +0100, The Reids wrote:

    > Following up to Mark Hewitt
    >
    >>>>You are joking?!
    >>>
    >>> no, never seen one.

    >>
    >>Put that right today. Get some chips, and some bread!

    >
    > got close yesterday, "chicken toasted sandwich with chips", I
    > went for belly of pork with sweet potato mash.


    You see, that's your mistake. You should have jumped at the chance to
    broaden your culinary horizons. ;-)
    --
    Tim C.
     
  10. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to Tim Challenger

    >> got close yesterday, "chicken toasted sandwich with chips", I
    >> went for belly of pork with sweet potato mash.

    >
    >You see, that's your mistake. You should have jumped at the chance to
    >broaden your culinary horizons. ;-)


    hummmm. Didnt fancy that combination at all. It would have been
    sausage and mash second choice.
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  11. Julie

    Julie Guest

    On Wed, 6 Apr 2005 08:11:33 +0100, "Mark Hewitt"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"The Reids" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> I have never actually seen a chip buttie, although
    >> i'm sure poor people eat them to fill up, at least in the past.

    >
    >You are joking?! Chip butties are gorgeous! I always make sure I have some
    >bread whenever having chips :)
    >

    Completely agree. When DH goes out for fish and chips, I have to do
    three things - get out the plates and run them under the hot tap to
    get them warm, get out the salt and vinegar, and butter some bread.
    Chips without bread and butter is unthinkable to me.
    --

    Julie S

    (if you love the idea of free books click on www.bookcrossing.com)
     
  12. dgs

    dgs Guest

    Arri London wrote:

    >
    > The Reids wrote:
    >
    >>Following up to Deep Foiled Malls
    >>
    >>
    >>>>In a tourist restaurant away from the part of Spain it belongs,
    >>>>sometimes less than perfect. A Spanish restaurateur said the
    >>>>same. But I have rarely had *any* "atrocious" food in Spain.
    >>>
    >>>*resists like hell in passing comment once again on the English's
    >>>pallet*

    >>
    >>I don't understand? What has UK got to do with paella?

    >
    > LOL look again. The word was 'pallet'. The poster clearly has taken
    > exception to English pallets for whatever reason LOL.


    Right. Next, that poster will be taking exception to English fork lifts
    and warehouses. (Uh-oh, possible bad assumption: does the American-
    English term "fork lift" mean the same thing in British-English?)
    --
    dgs
     
  13. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to Arri London

    >LOL look again. The word was 'pallet'. The poster clearly has taken
    >exception to English pallets for whatever reason LOL.


    pallets, food and the weather. I'm surprised they bothered to
    build stonehenge, its so cloudy here!
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  14. The Reids

    The Reids Guest

    Following up to dgs

    > (Uh-oh, possible bad assumption: does the American-
    >English term "fork lift" mean the same thing in British-English?)


    In England it describes the american habit of eating only with
    the fork. OK. I lied, its a electric truck that lifts pallets.
    --
    Mike Reid
    Wasdale-Thames path-London-Photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Eat-walk-Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  15. Edmund Lewis

    Edmund Lewis Guest

    The Reids wrote:
    > Following up to Edmund Lewis
    >
    > > I have never actually seen a chip buttie,
    > >
    > >Crikey! How can you live in the UK for umpteen years and not......

    >
    > 56 years, not a sniff of one :)
    >


    > >I think it was appreciated to some extent pre-industrial Revolution,

    at
    > >least among the more well-to-do. However I think what we are seeing

    is
    > >a re-emergence of that appreciation.

    >
    > There are books written on it, the causes are legion. Protestant
    > work culture, WW2 and rationing, anglo saxon culture, anti
    > catholicism, anti eurpoeanism, early industrialisation and so on.
    > Certainly, somehow, by victorian times, the young Mrs Beeton was
    >


    I've got a book about it somewhere
    I'm probably a little too young to have seen the full force of the
    change, but I've grown up thinking that food as late as the 1950s
    conformed to all the worst British food stereotypes- boiled everything,
    shoe-leather meat etc. This is based on what people of that era have
    told me as much as anything else.

    >
    > > and like
    > >> the US, food has changed drastically over the last 30 years. It
    > >> hasnt reached the bottom of the pile yet, hence Jamie Oliver and
    > >> his school dinners campaign.

    > >
    > >Came 25 years too late for me :)

    >
    > Sounds like your mum cooked like mine :)


    She cooked OK actually- it's school food I was primarily on about. And
    don't get me started on hospital food either (didn't Oliver target that
    as well?) :-0

    Edmund
     
  16. yaofeng

    yaofeng Guest

    Two popular paella dishes in Newark, NJ are paella velenciana and
    paella marinera.
     
  17. d_jay_double

    d_jay_double Guest

    Thomas wrote:
    > > Ireland and UK are "potato and beer cultures".
    > > Italy is I suppose a wheat and wine culture.
    > > Spain, I cant decide, certainly wine.
    > > France: potato and wine?
    > > Can anyone draw a word map of the dominance of the potato, rice
    > > or wheat through Europe, along with beer and wine?

    >
    > Look at any decent Italian cookbook, and it is really only the south

    where
    > Wheat (Pasta, bread) is the main culture.
    > Up North it is much more potato/rice that prevails.


    On a similar note, there is a pass in the north of Tuscany, passo della
    Cisa, known as the olive oil/lard border! Lard in the north, olive oil
    in the south...luckily I'm below the olive oil line!
     
  18. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    The Reids wrote:
    >
    > Following up to Arri London
    >
    > >LOL look again. The word was 'pallet'. The poster clearly has taken
    > >exception to English pallets for whatever reason LOL.

    >
    > pallets, food and the weather. I'm surprised they bothered to
    > build stonehenge, its so cloudy here!
    > --
    > Mike Reid



    LOL! It's meant to attract the aliens. Didn't you know that each
    monolith emits radiation at a frequency undetectable by ESA/NASA ?
     
  19. Louis Cohen

    Louis Cohen Guest

    Like China, wheat and spuds in cooler places, rice in warmer climates.
    You'll find climate-based food differences in any country large enough
    to have different climates. Isn't northern Italy big on butter and
    dairy, and the south uses olive oil?

    Why do you think they use hickory wood for BBQ in the southeastern US
    and mesquite in Texas - because that's what they have a lot of.
     
  20. On 10 Apr 2005 17:29:08 -0700, "Louis Cohen" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Like China, wheat and spuds in cooler places, rice in warmer climates.
    >You'll find climate-based food differences in any country large enough
    >to have different climates. Isn't northern Italy big on butter and
    >dairy, and the south uses olive oil?


    Erm... no, the north is bigger on olive oil that butter. True they use
    butter here, but olive oil is far more common.
    --
    ---
    DFM - http://www.deepfriedmars.com
    ---
    --
     
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