ever suck a bee up your nose?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Bruce Edge, Apr 30, 2004.

  1. Bruce Edge

    Bruce Edge Guest

    Mild trail, what can go wrong? I suck in a fu*king bee.
    Cough, it goes up my sinus cavity, plants is stinger
    somethere above my throat and behind my left nostril.

    Stop. Snaaaark, Cough, Snooorkkkk, Hack. repeat...,
    again, more...

    Finally blow it out, bastard flies away. Feels like I just
    snorted battery acid.

    Stand and wonder in disbelief at what just happened. Getting
    hard to swallow now. 1 min later can't swallow, think about
    calling 911, contempating the potential cost of the medivac
    scraps that idea.

    If you've ever not been able to swallow, you know that it
    causes a certain degree of panic to go through ones mind.

    Try swallow water, that works, drain half camelback, snort,
    snark, hack a bit more. Still feel stinger in my
    throat/nasal cavity.

    Wait another min wondering what the hell one's suppoed to do
    in this situation, can't come up with anything intelligent,
    neither can anyone else. Hearing "Bummer dude" and "that
    sucks" is not helpful. So I just finished the ride.

    Just for the record, if it happens to anyone else, it's not
    fatal, despite what it feels like at the time. This was
    yesterday, today I can barely feel it. However, it's not
    something I'd recommend.

    -Bruce
     
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  2. John Harlow

    John Harlow Guest

    A bee went into my mouth just last week, fortunately I spit
    it out before it knew what was going on. Bug inhilation is
    quite the common thing around here.

    > Just for the record, if it happens to anyone else, it's
    > not fatal, despite what it feels like at the time.

    I imagine it could bee for some. I wonder if anyone has ever
    been intibated with a camelbak hose ?
     
  3. Sittingduck

    Sittingduck Guest

    Bruce Edge wrote:

    > Just for the record, if it happens to anyone else, it's
    > not fatal, despite what it feels like at the time. This
    > was yesterday, today I can barely feel it. However, it's
    > not something I'd recommend.
    >

    Wow, that is scary.... I once got a small bug in my ear,
    and it nearly drove me insane listening to it buzz
    around in there.
     
  4. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Fri, 30 Apr 2004 11:53:42 -0700, Bruce Edge wrote:
    > Mild trail, what can go wrong? I suck in a fu*king bee.
    > Cough, it goes up my sinus cavity, plants is stinger
    > somethere above my throat and behind my left nostril.

    Ouch! I've inhaled a few bugs - always on a trail near a
    lake - but never a bee. Kind of unavoidable, given the need
    for oxygen!

    Glad everything is better now.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail
    address, at least)
     
  5. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >Just for the record, if it happens to anyone else, it's
    >not fatal,

    You lucked out. Definately CB fatal to somebody who is more
    sensitized than you were. CB fatal to you next time.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  6. Shawn Curry

    Shawn Curry Guest

    John Harlow wrote:

    > A bee went into my mouth just last week, fortunately I
    > spit it out before it knew what was going on. Bug
    > inhilation is quite the common thing around here.
    >
    >
    >>Just for the record, if it happens to anyone else, it's
    >>not fatal, despite what it feels like at the time.
    >
    >
    > I imagine it could bee for some. I wonder if anyone has
    > ever been intubated with a camelbak hose ?
    >
    >
    Damn good idea. Gotta remember that. (My wife's a doc,
    she does the real thing from time to time. I'll get her
    to do it).

    Shawn
     
  7. Bruce Edge

    Bruce Edge Guest

    (Pete Cresswell) wrote:
    > RE/
    >
    >>Just for the record, if it happens to anyone else, it's
    >>not fatal,
    >
    >
    > You lucked out. Definately CB fatal to somebody who is
    > more sensitized than you were. CB fatal to you next time.

    Is previous exposure what determines one's level of allergic
    reaction to a bee sting?

    -Bruce
     
  8. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >Is previous exposure what determines one's level of
    >allergic reaction to a bee sting?

    It's not the only thing, but previous exposure can
    definately sensitize some people so that they react more
    strongly on subsequend exposures.

    Been there, done that....afterwards had three (count 'em:
    1-2-3!) doctors from the ER process approach me later,
    unsolicited, on their own - to tell me I almost died. One
    said words the effect that I should have been dead. That's
    there I get the bit about sensitization - no technical
    knowledge, just experience and talking to various docs.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  9. M. Prindle

    M. Prindle Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Bruce Edge <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Just for the record, if it happens to anyone else, it's
    > not fatal, despite what it feels like at the time. This
    > was yesterday, today I can barely feel it. However, it's
    > not something I'd recommend.

    Unless you are one of the unlucky ppl that are allergic to
    bee stings. I had one sting me a while back and my hand
    turned into a balloon.

    M. Prindle
     
  10. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    On Fri, 30 Apr 2004 15:41:17 -0400, John Harlow wrote:

    >> Just for the record, if it happens to anyone else, it's
    >> not fatal, despite what it feels like at the time.
    >
    > I imagine it could bee for some.

    I wish you wouldn't drone on.
     
  11. S O R N I

    S O R N I Guest

    bomba wrote:
    > On Fri, 30 Apr 2004 15:41:17 -0400, John Harlow wrote:
    >
    >>> Just for the record, if it happens to anyone else, it's
    >>> not fatal, despite what it feels like at the time.
    >>
    >> I imagine it could bee for some.
    >
    > I wish you wouldn't drone on.

    Allergic? Might get hives.

    Bill "no easy 'that stung, now buzz off' from me" S.
     
  12. No One

    No One Guest

    Got stung 13 times when I was a kid, now I have to carry a
    large syringe full of adrenaline in case I get stung again
    and have an allergic reaction. Never know, maybe that
    adrenaline would come in handy on a big climb!
     
  13. Tm

    Tm Guest

    " S o r n i" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > bomba wrote:
    > > On Fri, 30 Apr 2004 15:41:17 -0400, John Harlow wrote:
    > >
    > >>> Just for the record, if it happens to anyone else,
    > >>> it's not fatal, despite what it feels like at the
    > >>> time.
    > >>
    > >> I imagine it could bee for some.
    > >
    > > I wish you wouldn't drone on.
    >
    > Allergic? Might get hives.
    >
    I am afraid this thread is just going to bumble along.
     
  14. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    Bruce Edge wrote:
    > Mild trail, what can go wrong? I suck in a fu*king bee.
    > Cough, it goes up my sinus cavity, plants is stinger
    > somethere above my throat and behind my left nostril.
    >
    > Stop. Snaaaark, Cough, Snooorkkkk, Hack. repeat...,
    > again, more...
    >
    > Finally blow it out, bastard flies away. Feels like I just
    > snorted battery acid.
    >
    > Stand and wonder in disbelief at what just happened.
    > Getting hard to swallow now. 1 min later can't swallow,
    > think about calling 911, contempating the potential cost
    > of the medivac scraps that idea.
    >
    > If you've ever not been able to swallow, you know that it
    > causes a certain degree of panic to go through ones mind.
    >
    > Try swallow water, that works, drain half camelback,
    > snort, snark, hack a bit more. Still feel stinger in my
    > throat/nasal cavity.
    >
    > Wait another min wondering what the hell one's suppoed to
    > do in this situation, can't come up with anything
    > intelligent, neither can anyone else. Hearing "Bummer
    > dude" and "that sucks" is not helpful. So I just finished
    > the ride.
    >
    > Just for the record, if it happens to anyone else, it's
    > not fatal, despite what it feels like at the time. This
    > was yesterday, today I can barely feel it. However, it's
    > not something I'd recommend.
    >
    > -Bruce

    I snorted a gnat yesterday at SJT <g>

    Don't know if it was a bee or ??, but awhile back this thing
    flew into my mouth. It slammed into the back of my throat; I
    hacked it up and spit it out. My throat was sore for a few
    hours and I had some problems swallowing.

    Glad to hear you didn't need medical attention.
    --
    Slacker
     
  15. Mark Fowler

    Mark Fowler Guest

    "John Harlow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > A bee went into my mouth just last week, fortunately I
    > spit it out before
    it
    > knew what was going on. Bug inhilation is quite the common
    > thing around here.
    >

    I was riding to a band practice a few years back. Halfway
    there a bee flew in my mouth and I instinctivelt put my hand
    in to pull it out - sadly not before it paniced and stung my
    lip!! By the time I got to band practice I was a dribbling
    fool with a completely numb bottom lip that was 3 or 4 times
    its usual size!! Not very good when you happen to be the
    singer in the band. Mark
     
  16. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Sat, 1 May 2004 22:02:48 +0000 (UTC), Mark Fowler wrote:

    > I was riding to a band practice a few years back. Halfway
    > there a bee flew in my mouth and I instinctivelt put my
    > hand in to pull it out - sadly not before it paniced and
    > stung my lip!! By the time I got to band practice I was a
    > dribbling fool with a completely numb bottom lip that was
    > 3 or 4 times its usual size!! Not very good when you
    > happen to be the singer in the band.

    Reminds me of the "Buckwheat Sings" sketch. "Unce, tice, fee
    times a mady"..

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail
    address, at least)
     
  17. Sniffinvinyl

    Sniffinvinyl Guest

    This reminds me of an old old thread entitled "How you know
    when your addicted to cycling".

    You can identify bugs by their taste.

    Sniffinvinyl
    ----------------
    Remain sane, cycle your brains out . . .

    "Bruce Edge" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Mild trail, what can go wrong? I suck in a fu*king bee.
    > Cough, it goes up my sinus cavity, plants is stinger
    > somethere above my throat and behind my left nostril.
    >
    > Stop. Snaaaark, Cough, Snooorkkkk, Hack. repeat...,
    > again, more...
    >
    > Finally blow it out, bastard flies away. Feels like I just
    > snorted battery acid.
    >
    > Stand and wonder in disbelief at what just happened.
    > Getting hard to swallow now. 1 min later can't swallow,
    > think about calling 911, contempating the potential cost
    > of the medivac scraps that idea.
    >
    > If you've ever not been able to swallow, you know that it
    > causes a certain degree of panic to go through ones mind.
    >
    > Try swallow water, that works, drain half camelback,
    > snort, snark, hack a bit more. Still feel stinger in my
    > throat/nasal cavity.
    >
    > Wait another min wondering what the hell one's suppoed to
    > do in this situation, can't come up with anything
    > intelligent, neither can anyone else. Hearing "Bummer
    > dude" and "that sucks" is not helpful. So I just finished
    > the ride.
    >
    > Just for the record, if it happens to anyone else, it's
    > not fatal, despite what it feels like at the time. This
    > was yesterday, today I can barely feel it. However, it's
    > not something I'd recommend.
    >
    > -Bruce
     
  18. Chris

    Chris Guest

    "Socks" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On Fri, 30 Apr 2004 14:24:58 -0700, Bruce Edge wrote:
    >
    > > (Pete Cresswell) wrote:
    > >> RE/
    > >>
    > >>>Just for the record, if it happens to anyone else, it's
    > >>>not fatal,
    > >>
    > >> You lucked out. Definately CB fatal to somebody who is
    > >> more sensitized than you were. CB fatal to you next
    > >> time.
    > >
    > > Is previous exposure what determines one's level of
    > > allergic reaction to a bee sting?
    >
    > maybe in combination with other factors (including
    > genetic). remember, there are those "bee sting therapy"
    > folks who sting themselves like crazy and (AFAIK) don't
    > automatically develop sensitivity. Example:
    >
    > "Armed with a jar of bees, Donna began her regimen of
    > receiving 60 stings every other day. A year later, she
    > walked across the room at an MS support group meeting
    > without the use of her cane. The other members couldn't
    > believe her progress"
    >
    > http://www.msa-sea.org/Medical/Alternative/Bees.htm
    >
    > (so, try to keep it under 60 every other day!)

    My dad had MS, he used to do the bee sting thing. Said it
    helped quite a bit. He never did anywhere near 60 every
    other day though.
     
  19. Fred Hinkson

    Fred Hinkson Guest

    I know what you feel. Had a bloody sinus infection a week
    and a day now. Chills,fever,dizzy at 1st. Then came head and
    neck pain. And on Saturday head pain and more head pain with
    the cough. Sunday felt fine with just a cough with all that
    green phem coming up with every cough. Been on antibotics
    since Thursday night with a few days to go of them.

    MTB Ride hard die free.
     
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