Ex smokers and running - advice????

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by K-K Mc, Sep 14, 2003.

  1. K-K Mc

    K-K Mc Guest

    Hi NG, I have always been into my running and weight training though I have smoked for 15 years. I
    am 35 and I am giving the horrible, smelly things up so wish me well !! I used to smoke about 15 a
    day and I stopped about ten days ago. I feel at my height and weight (6feet 1) and 224 lbs that I
    had better quit this filthy habit. My chest is clearing and I can taste and smell better already.

    Despite my habit I always used to go for runs, my method was not to have a smoke for four hours
    before the run. This way I could get round my 4 mile course in about 35 minutes. Ok, this time is
    not going to get Paula Radcliffe worried about my taking her record from her but it's good enough
    for me. My point here is that I expected (perhaps too quickly) to see an improvement almost straight
    away. When can a runner expect to see improvements here? Has the effect of my running "negated" my
    smoking habit all along so that 35 minutes is in fact "my time" and if I want to get better then
    stopping smoking is nothing to do with it?

    If you have exercised regularly, would that have offset some of the damage of the smoking? Or would
    you be thinking "think where I might have been if I wouldn't have started".

    Much appreciate some views on this guys? I am determined to stop smoking and increase my fitness. I
    did the half marathon last year and came in at 1.48. I am determined to do it in 1.30 !!!!

    Steve
     
    Tags:


  2. Steve, Yes.

    Bill R.

    =============> - -- - (_!_)
    OO
     
  3. Citizen Ted

    Citizen Ted Guest

    On Tue, 15 Apr 2003 23:33:52 +0100, "k-k MC" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hi NG, I have always been into my running and weight training though I have smoked for 15 years. I
    >am 35 and I am giving the horrible, smelly things up so wish me well !!

    You probably won't see a dramatic improvement in your cardiovascular system for as long as 9
    months. If you continue running and stay quit, you will likely improve faster.

    If you really want to get your times down, you need to get more serious about your running.
    I would suggest you join a local running club. They will assist you and motivate you and may
    even give you some good advice about tempo runs and speed training. Go get a book. Go pick
    up Runners World. Learn.

    Then, be willing to expend some effort. Just plodding along at a comfortable pace is great
    for aerobic fitness but it won't help you much if you want to run faster and farther. Decide
    what you really want out of running, then go get that thing.

    - TR
    - starting to sound like all the other rec.runners. AaaaaahHhh!!!
     
  4. Hp_brs

    Hp_brs Guest

    Congrats on the initiative to stop smoking. You won't work 15 years of tar out of your lungs in 9
    days, so I think you can look forward to faster times ahead. Even if you don't get one bit faster,
    you have dramatically reduced your chances of getting cancer or any number of upper respiratory
    illnesses. And your clothes and breath will smell a lot better, so keep up the good work.

    "k-k MC" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<b7i1cf$15r9g$1[email protected]>...
    > Hi NG, I have always been into my running and weight training though I have smoked for 15 years. I
    > am 35 and I am giving the horrible, smelly things up so wish me well !! I used to smoke about 15 a
    > day and I stopped about ten days ago. I feel at my height and weight (6feet 1) and 224 lbs that I
    > had better quit this filthy habit. My chest is clearing and I can taste and smell better already.
    >
    > Despite my habit I always used to go for runs, my method was not to have a smoke for four hours
    > before the run. This way I could get round my 4 mile course in about 35 minutes. Ok, this time is
    > not going to get Paula Radcliffe worried about my taking her record from her but it's good enough
    > for me. My point here is that I expected (perhaps too quickly) to see an improvement almost
    > straight away. When can a runner expect to see improvements here? Has the effect of my running
    > "negated" my smoking habit all along so that 35 minutes is in fact "my time" and if I want to get
    > better then stopping smoking is nothing to do with it?
    >
    > If you have exercised regularly, would that have offset some of the damage of the smoking? Or
    > would you be thinking "think where I might have been if I wouldn't have started".
    >
    > Much appreciate some views on this guys? I am determined to stop smoking and increase my fitness.
    > I did the half marathon last year and came in at 1.48. I am determined to do it in 1.30 !!!!
    >
    > Steve
     
  5. "k-k MC" <[email protected]> wrote...
    >
    > When can a runner expect to see improvements here?

    Hey Steve, first off, congrats on taking this big bold important step. Second of all, you will
    improve and feel better when you run - just give it some time. I don't know if you'll
    "automatically" get much faster right away, but I'm thinking you might also be able to train more
    intensely once your lungs recover. FWIW, I just quit too, and I'm feeling the improvement, but I
    only smoked for half a year, so that comparison doesn't really make much sense.

    Beyond calculating and wondering how by many minutes not smoking makes you faster, just enjoy the
    fact that you *can* run, whenever you want, that you can improve more quickly, run further, run
    faster, push a little more. And you'll improve all by yourself.

    Have fun! :D nina
     
  6. K-K Mc

    K-K Mc Guest

    Thanks guys for all your help and suggestions. And I still have not had a smoke yet !! I feel good
    still - true test is when I next go to a party or something !! Steve

    "nina stoessinger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "k-k MC" <[email protected]> wrote...
    > >
    > > When can a runner expect to see improvements here?
    >
    > Hey Steve, first off, congrats on taking this big bold important step.
    Second of
    > all, you will improve and feel better when you run - just give it some
    time. I
    > don't know if you'll "automatically" get much faster right away, but I'm
    thinking
    > you might also be able to train more intensely once your lungs recover.
    FWIW, I
    > just quit too, and I'm feeling the improvement, but I only smoked for half
    a year,
    > so that comparison doesn't really make much sense.
    >
    > Beyond calculating and wondering how by many minutes not smoking makes you
    faster,
    > just enjoy the fact that you *can* run, whenever you want, that you can
    improve
    > more quickly, run further, run faster, push a little more. And you'll
    improve all
    > by yourself.
    >
    > Have fun! :D nina
     
  7. Steve Common

    Steve Common Guest

    "k-k MC" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>Much appreciate some views on this guys? I am determined to stop smoking
    >and increase my fitness. I did the half marathon last year and came in at 1.48. I am determined to
    >do it in 1.30 !!!!

    I was on 60 a day. I'd done no sport whatever from age 23 to 40. I stopped smoking but didn't
    exercise and put on 10 kilos (69kg->79kg).

    At 40yo I started going to the gym and that got me into running. 6 months later I was back down to
    72 kilos and did my first road race (half marathon in 1:43).

    I have gone from he who was breathless for 2 minutes after walking up two flights of stairs, to
    68kilos and a 2:55 marathon in 3 years.

    Other side effect, the money I saved, which worked out at about 1500 euros/year in France at the
    time (so probable >£3000 in the UK) paid for a computer + Internet access and will cover a decent
    pair of running pumps every 3 months for life :)
     
  8. "steve common" <[email protected]> wrote...
    >
    > I have gone from he who was breathless for 2 minutes after walking up two flights of stairs, to
    > 68kilos and a 2:55 marathon in 3 years.

    This goes into my "inspiration" folder. Thanks for sharing and I'm pretty much speechless. You
    rock, man.

    nina
     
  9. "k-k MC" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<b7i1cf$15[email protected]>...
    > Hi NG, I have always been into my running and weight training though I have smoked for 15 years. I
    > am 35 and I am giving the horrible, smelly things up so wish me well !! I used to smoke about 15 a
    > day and I stopped about ten days ago. I feel at my height and weight (6feet 1) and 224 lbs that I
    > had better quit this filthy habit. My chest is clearing and I can taste and smell better already.
    >
    > Despite my habit I always used to go for runs, my method was not to have a smoke for four hours
    > before the run. This way I could get round my 4 mile course in about 35 minutes. Ok, this time is
    > not going to get Paula Radcliffe worried about my taking her record from her but it's good enough
    > for me. My point here is that I expected (perhaps too quickly) to see an improvement almost
    > straight away. When can a runner expect to see improvements here? Has the effect of my running
    > "negated" my smoking habit all along so that 35 minutes is in fact "my time" and if I want to get
    > better then stopping smoking is nothing to do with it?
    >
    > If you have exercised regularly, would that have offset some of the damage of the smoking? Or
    > would you be thinking "think where I might have been if I wouldn't have started".
    >
    > Much appreciate some views on this guys? I am determined to stop smoking and increase my fitness.
    > I did the half marathon last year and came in at 1.48. I am determined to do it in 1.30 !!!!
    >
    > Steve

    I quit smoking 3 and a half years ago after smoking 2 to 3 packs a day for 28 years. I managed to
    fool myself into thinking that I was active enough to keep my lungs cleared out despite the smoking.
    One of the requirements for getting my black belt in karate five years ago was to run five miles
    with no walking allowed. After finishing a cigarette I made the run, then lit up to celebrate. It
    finally caught up with me when I caught a cold and didn't feel like running. Without the exercise to
    clear my lungs things went down hill fast. A chest x-ray and found that I had the beginnings of
    emphysema.

    I had tried to quit many times before, but this was different. I couldn't see trolling one of those
    little green cylinders around fitting into my lifestyle, so I set a date to quit (like right then
    wasn't good enough ;) and just stopped. I didn't allow myself to have another one because I knew
    that I'd be right back to two packs a day in no time, and it would kill me.

    To take my mind off wanting to have a smoke I started exercising more. First inline skating, then
    jogging/running. At first things improved quickly, then they continued to improve at a more moderate
    pace. I would say that my lungs took nine months to a year to recover after quitting smoking.
    (That's recover as much as they were going to. They will never be as good as if I hadn't smoked.) It
    also took about a year to stop reaching for a smoke when turning the alarm off in the morning.

    For a year after that I just seemed to maintain the same pace. Then I decided to try going faster
    and further. To gain speed I started going to a track every Wednesday and ran intervals. Saturday I
    would go for a long run. I was still skating just about every day, and I started bicycling on
    Tuesday and Thursday. The extra work did make a difference. At this point quitting smoking is no
    longer directly responsible for my improvements, but there is no way that I could have done the work
    needed to improve if I hadn't quit.
     
  10. >I was still skating just about every day

    Do you wear a pink tutu?

    Bill R.

    =============> - -- - ( o ) ( o )
    OO ?
    >-----<
     
  11. Len A.

    Len A. Guest

    What the... where are you from? Running pumps?
     
  12. >What the... where are you from? Running pumps?

    What the... are you talking about? No other post appears but yours, and since you're too dumb to
    quote it I am forced to ask.
     
  13. You've said something funny for a change. Maybe I might like you after all.....

    "Bill-always hard-Rodgers " <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >I was still skating just about every day
    >
    > Do you wear a pink tutu?
    >
    > Bill R.
    >
    > =============> - -- - ( o ) ( o )
    > OO ?
    > >-----<
    >
     
  14. Steve Common

    Steve Common Guest

    [email protected] (Len A.) wrote:

    >What the... where are you from? Running pumps?

    Yorkshire, à few decades ago. Haven't you ever heard of the original Reebok (then Foster) running
    pumps(tm)?

    Extract www.reebok.co.uk history section (NB for our cousins over the pond, 5d / 6d means fivepence
    or sixpence, unless it's a typo for 5s/6d (five shillings and sixpence) but it's unlikely.

    History

    In 1895 J W Foster, who was a member of the local running club, the Bolton Primrose Harriers, made
    his first pair of spiked running shoes in his garden shed. By 1900 Joseph was in business making
    handmade running shoes for local athletes. In 1904 Alf Shrubb broke the 10 mile record whilst
    wearing a pair of Fosters running pumps that cost him a 5d / 6d. By 1908 the pumps were a favourite
    of Olympic and professional athletes.
     
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