exceeding wheel manufacturer's max tire inflation recommendation

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by HandMeDownRider, Jun 30, 2013.

  1. HandMeDownRider

    HandMeDownRider New Member

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    I ride Mavic Open Pro wheels with Vredestein tires. The tires are rated at a max pressure of 175 psi. I usually ride them around 155. I just noticed on another thread (which is locked, so I started this one) that the max recommended pressure on the Open Pros with 23 tires is 138 psi. I didn't even know there were max pressures for rims. Checked the Mavic site and this is correct.

    When I take the pressure down to 138 they feel sluggish. Is this a real issue? Should I put lower pressure tires on? I was thinking of going with a Michelin Pro of some variety, probably in the 25 width.
     
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  2. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Most riders have found their optimum pressure somewhere between 85 and 120 psi, well within the limits set or recommended by most rim and tire manufacturers.

    Besides being more comfortable, lower pressure allows the tire to roll over textured surfaces and bumps more effectively, reducing deflection and rolling resistance.

    Most effective pressure is determined by rider weight, the tire, and road surface.
     
  3. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    FYI, the other thread isn't locked. The pressures given on the sides of a tire typically have nothing to do with what pressure is best for you to use. Likewise, pressure ratings for rims only indicate the pressure which you shouldn't exceed. That said, following oldbobcat's advice is a good idea. It's likely the tires feel "sluggish" at lower pressures because they're no longer reacting as sharply to imperfections in the pavement. What tires you choose really depends on what you want out of a tire and what kind of riding you do. Note that the Michelin Pro4 and Pro3 tires are race tires and will wear more quickly than tires not built for racing. The exception in that group is the Pro4 Endurance which is a training tire. Unfortunately, I don't think it's available in a 25mm width. There are, however loads of tires in 25 widths that would work well.
     
  4. HandMeDownRider

    HandMeDownRider New Member

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    Thanks alienator, I'll give the lower pressure more of a chance. I actually thought I was going "low" by inflating to 25 psi under the tire's recommended pressure. Is there any issue with inflating to, say 65psi under the max pressure on the tire (in my case 115-ish in a tire with max rating of 175)?
     
  5. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    Apparently too high a tire pressure can also decompress the spoke tension in the wheel. I'm not fully briefed on the details but it doesn't sound like a good thing.

    Manufacturers typically recommend body weight should dictate chosen pressure along the range. The heavier guys should run the higher pressures.

    Additional potential downside to riding pressure too high:
    Catastrophic blowouts
    Diminished riding comfort
    Retarded handling in wet weather
    Skittering over poor road conditions
     
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