Excessive mucous in body-how to get rid of it?

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Robin, Dec 16, 2003.

  1. sxpam

    sxpam Guest

    Hey Robin, Look up nutritional health methods by Dr. Bernard Jensen.

    Mike
     


  2. "rodney_victor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Robin <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Both my mother and sister in law have this. I realize that dairy is a common cause, perhaps food
    > > allergies such as wheat, but - if they made no dietary changes (which isn't likely for a few
    > > reasons), is there a supplement or cleanse that would help release some/all of it?
    >
    > Leslie Kenton writes in her book "ultra Health" that, apart from the normal mucus secreted by the
    > body's mucous membranes, the body also produces mucoids in response to toxicity or potentially
    > harmful substances. These mucoids include gel-like substances such as mucin, mucopolysaccharides
    > and mucoproteins. Unlike normal mucus, which is transparent and slippery, this excessive mucoid
    > matter tends to be hard and cloudy.

    These substances are components of normal mucus, and are neither hard nor cloudy.

    >
    > Kenton says European researchers have discovered that many foods have mucoid-forming properties

    What European researchers? Where did they publish their discoveries?

    > and are therefore called mucoid-forming foods, and thhat they call this mucoid-producing
    > properties in the digestive system "digestive leucocytosis".

    Digestive leukocytosis is the normal slight increase in white blood cells that occurs after
    digestion. It has nothing whatever to do with mucus.

    >
    > She says a diet high in mucoid-forming foods lowers resistance to infection and clogs the the
    > digestive system wand lymphatics with stagnant mucoid substances that lower vitality and encourage
    > the development of chronic illness.

    Nothing in the digestive system is stagnant unless there is an obstruction, and bowel obstructions
    are not caused by mucus. The fluid conducted by the "lymphatics" is lymph, which is neither mucus
    nor "mucoid substance" and the lymph vessels and glands do not get "clogged" with mucus.

    >
    > Most healing regimes are based on low mucoid-forming foods, Kenton says.

    Whose healing regimes?

    >
    > Dairy products, particularly those made from pasteurised cows' milk, are considered the most mucoid-
    > forming of all foods, she says. Second are meat, poultry, fish and eggs. Then come soya-based
    > foods such as tofu and textured vegetable protein, pulses (legumes), nuts and grains.

    Proteins are very large molecules which cannot pass through the walls of the small intestine and
    into the blood stream, which is good, because they could not be used by our cells, and many of them
    would be harmful in the body. Your digestive system breaks all the proteins in your food down into
    their component amino acids, which are very small molecules and can be absorbed. These amino acids
    are essential nutrients and are used by the body to build new tissues and to make such essential
    substances as enzymes and antibodies (and mucus). The cells that use amino acids cannot tell, and do
    not care what foods were digested to supply them. Surplus amino acids in the bloodstream that are
    not needed for these building processes can be burned for energy, or converted into fats and stored
    in your butt or love handles. They do NOT get processed into "excess mucus." So there simply are no
    such things as "mucoid forming foods."

    >
    > Fruits and vegetables are totally non-mucoid-forming, she says.

    This is the only correct statement so far. Carrots aren't "mucoid forming," either.

    I have not read "Ultra Health" by Leslie Kenton. But your statements here about mucus and foods are
    way out of line with what is known about anatomy and physiology, and if you have accurately reported
    Ms. Kenton's writing, she is wrong as well.

    --Rich
     
  3. Robin

    Robin Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Carole) wrote:

    > Robin <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<robinxjoy-
    > [email protected]>...
    > > Both my mother and sister in law have this. I realize that dairy is a common cause, perhaps food
    > > allergies such as wheat, but - if they made no dietary changes (which isn't likely for a few
    > > reasons), is there a supplement or cleanse that would help release some/all of it?
    >
    > Cellsalts (calcium, magnesium phosphate, potassium, sodium phosphate and sulphate, silica, iron
    > phosphate) get rid of mucuous out of the body.

    Carole, I'm not familiar with cellsalts. is there one that has all the ingredients in it that you
    list in your parentheses or are they individual cells salts that you are recommending?

    --
    "Be kind, because everyone you meet is fighting a desperate battle." Philo of Alexandria. Do not
    email if posting a response. TO EMAIL, REPLACE X WITH 4
     
  4. B-Ob1

    B-Ob1 Guest

  5. Rich Shewmaker, for some reason, does not want our friends who have an excess mucous problem to be
    aware of the fact that a simple adjustment to their diet can help to decrease the amount of mucoids
    in their bodies.

    Here's a story about the "Worst Doctor in America", posted to a couple of newsgroups earlier this
    year. The poster nominated Robert Dowling MD as "Worst Doctor" for throwing an ice cream and
    cheesecake party for his patient to whom he had given an artificial heart. The patient suffered a
    severe setback, experienced an overwhelming buildup of mucous and secretions in his lungs. Became he
    was too weak to expel that mucous, so an artificial breathing machine was used to keep him alive.

    Please note the poster's comment that the doctor's ignorance was probably due to the fact that
    nutrition is not a required course of study in medical school. This is a rather astonishing
    revelation, considering that good old Doctor Hippocrates, honoured as the father of medicine and
    whose oath doctors are still required to take, once said "Let food be your medicine, and your
    medicine food". It is something ignored or supressed by modern medicine.

    THE WORST DOCTOR IN AMERICA

    There have been many nominations for the worst doctor in America. Insurance companies no longer want
    to insure bad physicians. Many doctors can no longer afford to practice the art of healing because
    of escalating malpractice rates.

    In my opinion, there is one doctor who merits the "Worst Doctor" title above all other incompetents.

    He is Robert Dowling, M.D.

    During June of 2001, Dowling's Louisville, Kentucky, patient was given just thirty days to live.

    After a lifetime of abuse, this man's cardiovascular system sent a series of signals, all bad, to
    himself and to his attending physician.

    A lifetime of eating the wrong foods can translate into a painfully short future.

    What hath man wrought? A new artificial heart was implanted into Dowling's patient. He became the
    first human ever to receive a fully operational self-contained machine inside of his chest. The
    "AbiorCor pump" was implanted on July 2, 2001. A day that will live in history.

    Thirty days after the surgery, Robert Tools and his physician enjoyed a one-month anniversary
    celebration commemorating his survival.

    The lead researcher/physician, Robert Dowling, M.D., had this to say:

    "The goal of all of us working together is to give patients of this device a good quality of life."

    How did Dr. Dowling honor his patient?

    By staging a party for the guest of honor, and serving him ice cream and cheesecake.

    Mr. Artificial-Heart-Recipient may have had a bionic heart, but his arteries had been saturated by a
    lifetime of similar foods containing cholesterol and saturated animal fat.

    Ms. Dowling most certainly made a bad cardiovascular system just a little bit worse. His symbolic
    gesture immortalizes a physician's arrogance. Doctors such as Dowling believe that diet plays
    little role in human health and healing.

    Ben Cohen of Ben & Jerry's fame had quadruple heart surgery at about the same time. One wonders
    whether his physician threw him an ice cream party too.

    http://www.notmilk.com/benheart.html

    Would you think it wise to eat ice cream and cheesecake after having life-saving heart surgery?

    Mt. Dowling explained why he would feed his critically ill artificial heart recipient saturated
    animal fat containing casein, a tenacious glue and mucous forming protein.

    "The goal...is to give patients...a good quality of life..."

    How did Mr. Tools react to the cheesecake and ice cream?

    He suffered a severe setback, and was placed on a ventilator to assist his breathing. The
    artificial heart recipient experienced an overwhelming buildup of mucous and secretions in his
    lungs. Mr. Tools became too weak to expel that mucous, so the artificial breathing machine was used
    to keep him alive.

    Eat casein and produce histamines, then mucous. The reaction is often delayed, occurring 12-15 hours
    after consumption.

    By eliminating all milk and dairy for just one week, most people note the differences, which include
    less mucous, better sleep patterns, more energy, better bowel movements, clarity of thought, and
    muscle, bone, and back pain relief.

    Why don't Dr. Dowling know this? Could the fact that nutrition is not a required course of study in
    medical school have anything to do with a physician's ignorance?

    The Abicor device can be a lifesaver, but dairy-loving doctors like Dowling can be hazardous to
    one's health.

    Please share the following (which appeared in the Journal of Allergy and Immunology in March of
    1998) with your physician so that he or she does not repeat Dowling's folly:

    "Cow's milk is one of the most frequent food allergens. Whole casein appears to be highly
    allergenic...85% of the patients presented a response to each of the four caseins. "

    OBITUARY NOTICE

    Ice cream and cheesecake were given to a patient soon after life-saving heart surgery. The man was
    killed, and his doctor should be charged as an accomplice. The murder weapons? A spoon and a fork.
    The motives? Arrogance and ignorance.

    That was just the prescription given to artificial heart recipient, Robert Tools, by his so-called
    healer, Robert Dowling, M.D.

    Mu. AbiorCor recipient died soon after Dr. Dowling allowed him to attend his final party. Dowling
    blamed his death on long-standing health problems.

    In early November of 2001, Tools feasted upon a cheesesteak sandwich and chocolate milkshake during
    an outing with the mayor of Louisville, Kentucky.

    A hospital press release noted that bleeding started soon after the meal and shortly thereafter,
    Tools' organs began to fail. The unlucky man suffered a stroke Nov. 11. He died the following Friday
    afternoon.

    The hospital said Tools' death was unrelated to the stroke.

    Tools is survived by his wife, Carol, and two children. His wife's comments:

    "After our decision to participate in this experimental procedure, he has been able to make a
    difference for mankind, enjoy some of his favorite things in life, and experience a bit of notoriety
    - and for Bob, nothing could have been better."

    Perhaps a diet low in saturated animal fat and cholesterol could have been better, Mrs. Tools. A plant-
    based diet may very well have extended your husband's life, and that example may have made much more
    of a contribution to mankind.

    Doctor's prescription: Ice cream, cheesecake, and cheesesteak sandwich. A recipe for heart disease,
    suffering, and death.
     
  6. Carole

    Carole Guest

    Robin <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > > Cellsalts (calcium, magnesium phosphate, potassium, sodium phosphate and sulphate, silica, iron
    > > phosphate) get rid of mucuous out of the body.
    >
    > Carole, I'm not familiar with cellsalts. is there one that has all the ingredients in it that you
    > list in your parentheses or are they individual cells salts that you are recommending?

    Individual cellsalts. Each one causes a different deficiency symptom. See below for an excerpt from
    The Biochemic Handbook about cellsalts. There are other books though which give similar information.

    You can get a tablet that contains the 12 cellsalts - called Combination 12 from the healthshop.

    NOSE Kali=potassiu, nat=sodium, mur=chloride

    Catarrh, accompanied by fever: Ferr.Phos. " acute or chronic, with slimy yellow, greenish
    discharges: Ferr.Phos., Kali Sulph. " Albuminous discharges, thick and tough, dropping from the
    posterior nares and causing constant hawking and spitting, worse out of doors: Calc.Phos. Catarrh,
    aggravated in evening: Kali Sulph. " aggravated in warm room: Kali Sulph. " dry, with stuffy
    sensation: Kali Mur. " chronic, with purulent discharges from anterior or posterior nares: Kali
    Sulph., Silica. " of anaemic persons: Nat.Mur., Calc.Phos. " with fetid discharges: Kali Phos. "
    with salty, watery mucus: Nat. Mur. " " stuffy sensations: Kali Mur. " " white, not transparent
    phlegm: Kali Mur. Cold in the hear, with yellow creamy discharge from the nose, itching of the nose:
    Nat.Phos. " in the third stage of resolution, when the discharge is thick, yellow, purulent and
    sometimes tinged with blood: Calc.Sulph. " with dry, harsh skin; to produce perspiration: Kali
    Sulph. Crusts in the vault of the pharynx: Kali Mur. Discharge, albuminous: Calc.Phos. " clear,
    watery, transparent mucus: Nat.Mur. " fetid: Kali Phos. " Slimy, yellow, watery, greenish: Kali
    Sulph. " thick and white: Kali Mur. " yellow, fetid: Silica. " lumphy, green: Calc. Fluor. "
    purulent, bloody: Calc.Sulph. " yellow, creamy: Nat.Phos. Disposition to catch cold in anaemic
    persons: Calc. Phos.,Mat.Mur. Dryness and burning in the nose: Nat.Sulph. Dryness of nose, with
    scabbing: Nat.Mur., Silica. Edges of nostrils, itch: Silica. First or inflammatory stage of colds:
    Ferr.Phos. Fluent coryza: Nat.Mur. Frequent sneezing: Silica, Nat.Mur. Fresh cold and discharge of
    clear, watery transparent mucus, and sneezing: Nat.Mur.

    Carole http://www.austarmetro.com.au/~hubbca/cellsalts.htm
     
  7. David Wright

    David Wright Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Carole <[email protected]> wrote:
    >[email protected] (David Wright) wrote in message
    >news:<[email protected]>...
    >> In article <[email protected]>, Carole
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >No I became un-thick the moment I stopped believing that conspiracies don't happen. We've been
    >> >conditioned to turn off when we hear the word "conspiracy".
    >>
    >> Quite rightly. Although conspiracies do happen on occasion, the idea that there are these massive
    >> conspiracies that you like to go on about is another matter entirely.
    >
    >You didn't read that sentence how it was meant to be read. What I am saying is that the whole world
    >is being manipulated to become a one-world government, that globalisation is a tool that is being
    >used to pull this off, that the mass media is manipulated and basically that we are being lied to.
    >For example the Port Arthur massacre was a planned psyop to remove guns from the Australian
    >population.

    I don't believe it, mostly because I don't believe the government is that smart or that overarching.
    I also think the idea of one-world government is a fantasy.

    >> >This moment was one of the deciding factors in my long question for the meaning of life.
    >>
    >> If this is the best you've done so far, your life would seem to have little meaning.
    >
    >As opposed to who's? What do you think the meaning of life is? Surely nothing can be more important
    >than finding out what life is all about and uncovering deceptions?

    Are you now happier and more fulfilled?

    >> >And your assumption that a person who sells a product is always biased is not necessarily
    >> >correct.
    >>
    >> On the contrary, it's basic human nature.
    >
    >Is a fruit and vegie grower biased? Is a builder who sells his services biased?

    Sure. As I said, it's human nature to believe in your own product. Even if you're a fraud, you'll
    still believe in it, which seems contradictory, but that's human nature for you.

    >> >Some people sell a product because they believe in it. But yes, generally you'd be right that
    >> >because a person sells a product they are just trying to increase sales. However, in Dave's case
    >> >you can't say this because he doesn't advertise in this ng and has nothing to gain in saying
    >> >that ginseng works.
    >>
    >> He has advertised extensively in this n.g. -- you just were absent for an extended period and
    >> missed it. So in fact, he has plenty to gain. That's why he showed up here in the first place.
    >
    >But I thought this group was like the soapies where you don't have to watch it all the time but can
    >still tell what is happening? Obviously I've missed something.

    Wow, you're wide open there, but I'll let it go this time. You missed a lot, weeks of spam from good
    ol' Dave about his crappy, massively overpriced ginseng.

    >So how long since ginseng Dave has tried to sell his product? Perhaps he's realised his mistake and
    >is now just trying to talk about ginseng and health in general. He seems to have a good grasp of
    >alternative medicine.

    I think he got warned by his ISP and that's what caused him to stop posting the ads.

    -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net These are my opinions only, but they're almost always
    correct. "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants were standing on my
    shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
     
  8. "rodney_victor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Rich Shewmaker, for some reason, does not want our friends who have an excess mucous problem to be
    > aware of the fact that a simple adjustment to their diet can help to decrease the amount of
    > mucoids in their bodies.
    >

    < "worst doctor" anti-science nonsense snipped >

    You have it wrong. I'm not only trying to explain that there are no "mucoid-forming foods" but that
    there is also no "excess mucus problem."

    I am well aware that you can come up with lots of cut and paste support for your pet mucus theory
    of disease. After all, it has been popular among scientific illiterates since it was proposed by
    Dr. Jarvis a century ago. There is plenty of verbiage on the internet about the hollow Earth theory
    or about the exploration of the moon being faked in Hollywood, too, but those fantasies are not
    true either.

    I'm curious. Just what specific symptoms and signs do you consider indicative of "excess mucus"?
    Runny nose? Stopped up nose? Productive cough? Tired feeling? Esophageal reflux? Shortness of
    breath? Please be specific.

    --Rich
     
  9. Carole

    Carole Guest

    [email protected] (David Wright) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Carole
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >[email protected] (David Wright) wrote in message
    > >news:<[email protected]>...
    > >
    > >> >> Or, don't bother reading it. If you do read it, remember that Dave sells the panacea he is
    > >> >> praising, and is not an objective reporter.
    > >> >
    > >> >The drug companies spend 40% of their budget on marketing. What exactly are you trying to say?
    > >>
    > >> Dear me, you *are* thick, aren't you? I said nothing specific about the drug companies at all
    > >> -- but it's clear that they aren't unbiased either. They are great believers in their own
    > >> products and their own approaches. I just think it's important to point out that the sellers of
    > >> so-called "alternative" remedies are also making a profit, and thus are not automatically on
    > >> the side of the angels, as too many pro-alts seem to believe.
    > >
    > >No I became un-thick the moment I stopped believing that conspiracies don't happen. We've been
    > >conditioned to turn off when we hear the word "conspiracy".
    >
    > Quite rightly. Although conspiracies do happen on occasion, the idea that there are these massive
    > conspiracies that you like to go on about is another matter entirely.

    You didn't read that sentence how it was meant to be read. What I am saying is that the whole world
    is being manipulated to become a one-world government, that globalisation is a tool that is being
    used to pull this off, that the mass media is manipulated and basically that we are being lied to.
    For example the Port Arthur massacre was a planned psyop to remove guns from the Australian
    population.

    > >This moment was one of the deciding factors in my long question for the meaning of life.
    >
    > If this is the best you've done so far, your life would seem to have little meaning.

    As opposed to who's? What do you think the meaning of life is? Surely nothing can be more important
    than finding out what life is all about and uncovering deceptions?

    > >And your assumption that a person who sells a product is always biased is not necessarily
    > >correct.
    >
    > On the contrary, it's basic human nature.

    Is a fruit and vegie grower biased? Is a builder who sells his services biased?

    > >Some people sell a product because they believe in it. But yes, generally you'd be right that
    > >because a person sells a product they are just trying to increase sales. However, in Dave's case
    > >you can't say this because he doesn't advertise in this ng and has nothing to gain in saying that
    > >ginseng works.
    >
    > He has advertised extensively in this n.g. -- you just were absent for an extended period and
    > missed it. So in fact, he has plenty to gain. That's why he showed up here in the first place.

    But I thought this group was like the soapies where you don't have to watch it all the time but can
    still tell what is happening? Obviously I've missed something.

    So how long since ginseng Dave has tried to sell his product? Perhaps he's realised his mistake and
    is now just trying to talk about ginseng and health in general. He seems to have a good grasp of
    alternative medicine.

    Carole http://www.austarmetro.com.au/~hubbca/health.htm "He who joyfully marches to music in rank
    and file has already earned my contempt. He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him
    the spinal cord would fully suffice. This disgrace to civilization should be done away with at once.
    Heroism at command, senseless brutality, deplorable love-of-country stance, how violently I hate all
    this, how despicable and ignoble war is; I would rather be torn to shreds than be a part of so base
    an action! It is my conviction that killing under the cloak of war is nothing but an act of murder."
    - Albert Einstein
     
  10. Eric Bohlman

    Eric Bohlman Guest

    [email protected] (Carole) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >> >And your assumption that a person who sells a product is always biased is not necessarily
    >> >correct.
    >>
    >> On the contrary, it's basic human nature.
    >
    > Is a fruit and vegie grower biased? Is a builder who sells his services biased?

    Yes in both cases. If you needed a builder for a project, you'd listen to his sales pitch *but*,
    realizing that he was inherently biased, you'd *also* seek out people he's done work for and find
    out how satisfied they were with his work. If you were running a restaurant, you wouldn't just
    take the grower's word as to the quality of his produce; you'd find out what his customers were
    saying about it.

    In other words, you'd gather *evidence*. Information about how satisfied a grower's or builder's
    customers are with his work is evidence. A grower's or builder's claims about how satisfied he is
    with his own work, OTOH, aren't evidence, because they convey no information about how well his
    products or services will meet *your* needs.

    And you would *not* gather that evidence solely on the basis of testimonials provided by the
    supplier. You would do your own homework. Because if either supplier had only a small percentage of
    satisfied customers, he could still get plenty of testimonials out of them.

    And you'd also look for some *objective* evidence in either case. You'd want evidence that the
    grower's produce meets your jurisdiction's agricultural standards. You'd want evidence that the
    builder's work meets your jurisdiction's building code.

    And guess what? Honest growers and builders *expect* their customers to check out the evidence for
    themselves. They *encourage* them to do so. It's only the peddlers of snake oil who act all put out
    if their customers are unwilling to act solely on their word. If a grower claimed that the
    agricultural inspectors were out to get him, or a builder claimed that the building inspectors
    refused to pass his work simply because he refused to pay them off, you'd get pretty suspicious.
    Those are classic red flags.

    Yet far too many promoters of "alternative medicine" make exactly such arguments. Like the dishonest
    grower or builder, they whine if anybody expects them to meet the same standards as their
    competitors.
     
  11. In <[email protected]>, Carole wrote:

    > And your assumption that a person who sells a product is always biased is not necessarily correct.
    > Some people sell a product because they believe in it.

    So if someone "believes in" a pharmaceutical product, they aren't biased?

    --
    | "Really, I'm not out to destroy Microsoft. That will just be a | completely unintentional side
    | effect. " -- Linus Torvalds |
    +--------------- D. C. Sessions <[email protected]> ----------+
     
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