Exercise for your Heart

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Mark Hilton, Oct 24, 2003.

  1. Mark Hilton

    Mark Hilton Guest

    Exercise for your Heart

    Exercise includes more than football, bike riding or doing a high energy aerobics class. Any kind of
    physical activity - such as mowing the lawn or playing Frisbee in the park is beneficial exercise.

    So what's so good about exercise? Many studies have found that moderate levels of exercise, are
    particularly beneficial for improving risk factors associated with heart disease. These include:

    decreasing blood pressure (both systolic and diastolic) reducing total and LDL cholesterol
    increasing the beneficial HDL cholesterol helping control body weight (being overweight or obese
    increases the chance of heart disease), and decreasing the chance of having a heart attack. It is
    important to note that exercise does not have to be vigorous, like running a mile, doing a high
    energy aerobics class, or playing squash. Any form of movement, such as walking, vacuuming or lawn
    mowing, is beneficial. BUT - the exercise must be regular! Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate
    exercise on most days of the week.

    You may say there just isn't enough time in the day to fit in 30 minutes of exercise. Well, the good
    news is that small amounts (eg 15 minutes) of more strenuous exercise accumulated over the day, is
    beneficial.

    So, let's get active! Choose an activity that is the most practical, achievable and likely to be the
    most enjoyable for you! This may involve tennis, jogging, walking, bike riding, swimming or using an
    exercise bike at home.

    Increase the amount of ‘incidental exercise' in your day. This is the type of movement you do as
    part of your normal routine which you don't have to think about doing. Try:

    using the stairs instead of the lift / escalator walking to the station or shops parking further
    away from the shops at the shopping centre getting off the bus 1 stop early and walking the rest Or,

    at work, take 10 minutes at lunch time for a short walk take your dog for a walk take the kids or
    grandkids to play in the park try ballroom or line dancing at a local club join a local walking or
    sports club. It is important to firstly have a Doctor's checkup and then start out on an exercise
    program slowly, if you haven't exercised for a while. Also, drink plenty of water before, during and
    after you exercise to prevent dehydration.

    So, enjoy the benefits of regular exercise - you will feel better and enjoy better health!

    Remember that not smoking and having a healthy diet are also important lifestyle factors, for
    reducing the risk of heart disease.

    This article was prepared by the nutritionists at Sanitarium Nutrition Service.
     
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  2. On Tue, 11 Nov 2003 15:05:41 GMT, John 'the Man' <[email protected]> wrote:

    >A challenging exercise goal would be to log a total of 50 METs a week. Of course, you should always
    >start out slow at low intensity and

    How do you think to add METs??? MET is the ratio btw, BMR and actual energy expenditure pr minute.
    If you run at 8 MET, you have an expenditure of 8 times basal metabolic rate. You can only compute
    daily average MET, Eg. running for 1 hour at 12 MET and otherwise sit in a chair at 1 MEt gives you
    an average of (12*1 hour) + (1*23 hour)/24 = 1.45 times BMR in average energy expenditure. But,
    being active at work, having an average of 2, gives (2*8) + (1*16)/ 24 = 1.33 in average, and you
    are not exhausted after already one hour. Being a washing woman, you may even expect to have a daily
    average of above 2. Washing stairs, floors etc. you may expect to have an average MEt of 3-6. Eg. at
    4 and sleeping for 16 hours afterwards gives (4*8 + 1*16)/24 = 2 :) If you are active at home,
    average will be even higher :) (And make it far easier to slim and it also gives more GLUT4
    transporters in muscle, so muscle has much bigger capacity for glucose, lessening the chances of
    getting diabetes)
     
  3. Once upon a time, our fellow Alf Christophersen rambled on about "Re: Exercise for your Heart." Our
    champion De-Medicalizing in sci.med.nutrition retorts, thusly ...

    >>A challenging exercise goal would be to log a total of 50 METs [hours] a week.

    >How do you think to add METs???

    CORRECTION!

    Every 50 met-h/wk was associated with a 26% reduction of risk of CHD. So working out at 5 METs would
    take 10 hours a week, while working harder at 10 MET would let you accomplish this goal in only 5
    hours of work.

    I reported in detail about using METs on Sat May 31, 2003 12:38 pm in my Yahoo Mailing List. See
    below for a JAMA citation and full text pdf file the on 50 Mets hours a week goal.

    ----------------
    How Hard Is Hard Enough?

    First of all, this post is for the benefit of advanced exercisers. Couch potatoes should start out
    with a slow walking exercise program.

    Perhaps the most important component of a sound exercise prescription for aerobic fitness is the
    level of exercise intensity. The prescribed level of intensity must be sufficient to overload your
    cardiovascular system, but not so severe that you over do it.

    Unfortunately, many adults - particularly those just starting an exercise program - have difficulty
    estimating the intensity of exercise needed to produce improvements in their aerobic fitness levels.

    In past decades, the aerobic exercise goal was set at achieving about 80 percent of your maximal
    heart rate. Now, the focus is on METs (metabolic equivalent tasks).

    What’s a MET? A MET or metabolic equivalent, is a way of expressing the rate of energy expenditure
    for a given physical activity. Specifically, one MET is equal to resting VO2 (volume of oxygen used)
    which is approximately 3.5 ml (oxygen) per kilogram (body weight) per minute.

    All physical activities can be classified on the basis of oxygen requirements. The amount of oxygen
    your body consumes is directly proportional to the energy you expend during the activity. At rest,
    your body consumes approximately 3.5 ml of oxygen per kilogram of body weight per minute. The
    resting level of oxygen consumption is referred to as l.0 MET. Thus, an eight-MET level would equal
    eight times the amount of oxygen you use at rest.

    To determine how many calories you are burning from a given physical activity, you need to know
    three things: (1)your body weight in kilograms, (2)the amount of time you performed the physical
    activity for and (3)the rate of energy expenditure expressed as METS.

    Energy Expenditure (cals per minute) = 0.0175 cals/kg/min. x MET x body weight (kg)

    Energy Expenditure (cals per minute) = 0.0175 x 4.0 METS x 70 (kg)
    = 4.9 calories per minute
    = 4.9 cals/min. x 60 minutes = 294 calories expended

    There are 2.2 pounds in 1 kilogram, so to get kilograms from pounds, divide the number of pounds you
    weigh by 2.2 and you have your body weight in kilograms.

    Modern exercise machines, like lifecycles, treadmills, and stairmasters, in health clubs will have a
    MET display on them. On machines like a treadmill increasing the grade as well as the speed will
    increase the MET. On the lifecycle that I use, a Level 11 on the Hill program gives me a minimum of
    a 5.1 MET and a maximum of a 10.6 MET. And, on the treadmill at a speed of
    4.3 mph with a grade of 1 gives me a constant MET of 6.1. This makes it pretty easy to measure just
    how intense your exercise program actually is. You can also consult a MET table such as the one
    below. The idea is to monitor how many MET hours you log in one week.

    For the scientific data you can consult our message #964 Exercise: Type & intensity in relation to
    CHD http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Health-with-Attitude/message/964

    Here is an updated citation with the Full Text of the study in pdf file format available for
    FREE online.

    Tanasescu M, Leitzmann MF, Rimm EB. Exercise type and intensity in relation to coronary heart
    disease in men. http://www.fchn.org/fmh/wmchh/articles/oct/exercise_type_intesity_cad_men.pdf JAMA.
    2002 Oct 23-30;288(16):1994-2000. PMID: 12387651

    LOW exercise intensity = 1-3.9 METs MODERATE exercise intensity= 4-5.9 METs HIGH exercise intensity=
    6 -12 METs

    The risk of death for those who could not get beyond 4 METs (brisk walking) was more than double the
    group who could get past 8 MET (jogging).

    There was a 4% risk reduction for each 1-MET increase, independent of the total amount of exercise.

    Every 50 met-h/wk was associated with a 26% reduction of risk of CHD. So working out at 5 METs would
    take 10 hours a week, while working harder at 10 MET would let you accomplish this goal in only 5
    hours of work.

    ---------------------------------------------------
    Table of Exercise Energy Expenditure
    ---------------------------------------------------
    1 mile = ~ 1.6 km -------------------------------------------- METs Sleeping 0.7
    ----------
    LOW intensity = 1-3.9 METs
    ----------
    Seated, quiet 1.0 Reading Home Energy articles 1.2 Standing 1.2 Typing 1.2-1.4 Driving 1.5 Writing
    Home Energy articles 1-5 Cooking 1.6-2.0 Carpentry, sawing 2.0 Walking-very slow: <2.0 mph 2.0 House
    cleaning 2.0-3.4 Dancing 2.4-4.4 Walking-slow: 2.0 mph 2.5 Walking: 2.5 mph 3.0 Calisthenics 3.0-4.0
    Walking-moderate: 3.0 mph 3.5
    ----------
    MODERATE intensity = 4-5.9 METs
    ----------
    Walking-brisk: 3.5 mph 4.0 Walking-very brisk: 4.5 mph 4.5 Basketball 5.0-7.6
    ----------
    HIGH intensity = 6 -12 METs
    ----------
    Walking uphill: 3.5 mph 6.0

    (Going slower than a 9-minute mile is considered jogging.) Jogging: 5 mph (12 min. mile) 8.0
    Calisthenics-pushups, situps-vigorous 8.0 Jogging: 5.2 mph (11.5 min.mile) 9.0 Jogging: 6 mph (10
    min. mile) 10.0 Jogging: 6.7 mph (9 min. mile) 11.0

    (Running a mile in less than 9 minutes is considered running. ) Running: 7 mph (8.5 min. mile) 11.5
    Running: 7.5 mph (8 min. mile) 12.5 Running: 8 mph (7.5 min. mile) 13.5 Running: 8.6 mph (7 min.
    mile) 14.0 Running: 9 mph (6.5 min. mile) 15.0 Running: up stairs 15.0 Running: 10 mph (6 min. mile)
    16.0 Running: 10.9 mph (5.5 min.mile) 18.0

    Other Met Tables http://healthfullife.umdnj.edu/editor/METs.htm http://www.plu.edu/~chasega/met.html
    http://www.discoverfitness.com/MET_value_table_.html
    ----------------
    --
    John Gohde, Achieving good Health is an Art, NOT a Science!

    Health-with-Attitude is a support group for people trying to follow a Healthy Lifestyle.
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Health-with-Attitude/
     
  4. On Fri, 14 Nov 2003 17:24:10 GMT, John 'the Man' <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Every 50 met-h/wk was associated with a 26% reduction of risk of CHD. So working out at 5 METs
    >would take 10 hours a week, while working harder at 10 MET would let you accomplish this goal in
    >only 5 hours of work.
    >
    >I reported in detail about using METs on Sat May 31, 2003 12:38 pm in my Yahoo Mailing List. See
    >below for a JAMA citation and full text pdf file the on 50 Mets hours a week goal.

    Ok. Then we agree.

    I have been writing about it severalt times earlier too, but using another name for it. It is in
    real the number you have to multiply your BMR with to get the actual energy expenditure at diverse
    physical activities.
     
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