Exercise induced asthma

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by ncandy, Mar 25, 2003.

  1. ncandy

    ncandy New Member

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    Has anyone had this problem. I have noticed my endurance level go down over the last couple of years. Hard to catch my breath and fatigue in my legs. My brother has this type of asthma.
     
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  2. Lazy legs

    Lazy legs New Member

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    ncandy, this is actually more common than most people think, the problem is that it varies in severity. My little one had asthma as a baby and even though she seemed to have outgrown it she now seem to get "coughing attacks" when she runs around a lot and according to the pediatrician this is still the asthma.
    You do get some medication for chronic asthma that you can use on a long term basis. They are quite pricy though (in RSA) and are only available on a doctor’s prescription. You get them in different strengths so you can start with a weak one and see how it works.
    A problem though is that I think a lot of these meds are on the banned substances lists so make sure about that before you take just anything, especially if you want to ride competitively.
    I don't know what the trade names are over there but I can try and find the generic names for you to help you find something similar over there if you want me to. Best thing though would be to discuss this with your GP.
     
  3. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    These symptoms could also be due to either too little training or overtraining (i.e. reduced endurance and fatigue in legs).

    I had exercise enduced asthma, but 'grew' out of it as got older and trained harder. Asthma and breathing in general is affected greatly by the environment particularly the cold and also by dehydration.

    Do any of these suggestions make sense for you? If you go to a physiology lab they will be able to look at pre and post exercise lung function values.
     
  4. Shibumi

    Shibumi New Member

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    Asthma is usually controlled with two types of inhalers. The ones which are normally blue such as Sabutamol, Ventolin, are for preventing an attack when it happens. For those with exercise-induced asthma (EIA), it is often recommended that you take a puff before exercise, as this will probably prevent EIA. I, and several cyclists I know, do this. In my case, this is almost 'did', as I now find that since upping my training intensity and getting fitter, I have now gone two months inhaler-free. The other inhalers - usually brown, contain steroids, and are used to build up resistance to asthma. They have no effect when taken during an attack.

    One thing I read is that EIA can subside naturally after 15-20 mins. I can attest to this, in my case. I therefore make sure I warm up for 20 mins, and, if I'm going to get asthma, I get it out of the way before I race.

    Asthma drugs are 'controlled' in cycle racing. ie you may be able to use them, but at the very least you should have a medical certificate.

    ***As I'm not a doctor, the above purely represents my own view, and I suggest that you seek professional medical advice***
     
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