Exercise

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Thad O, Mar 12, 2004.

  1. Thad O

    Thad O Guest

    A while ago i would go to a gym, but gave up because the gym
    was too far away ( I spent more time driving than exercising
    ). unfortunately there is no gym that is close by. What's
    worse is that I don't have room for any kind of equipment (
    I don't have romm for the stuff I already have, like my
    books ). Even if I did, I live in an apartment, so something
    like a stairmaster is out because of the noise.

    Aside from that outside the gym, the exercising I do tends
    to be uneven. What I would like to do is make a regiment (
    actually two so that if for some reason I can't do one, I
    can do the other ), which increases my flexibility and
    general strenth so that I can do my main exercises ( wlaking
    with a heavy backpack and bicycling ) for longer.

    For example, when bicycling for a while my trapezium get
    sore. So I need to get in some exercises that increase
    strenth there. Flexibilty at this point is very bad too.

    In particular I wish to strenthen the secondary and tertiary
    muscles used to support these activitys, especially to make
    up for over development of the principle muscles.

    So can anyone recommend some good website/books that will
    allow me to do this? Thanks
     
    Tags:


  2. Paul

    Paul Guest

    I would suggest Yoga. If you are persistent it will make you
    stronger and more flexible. I like the book "Power Yoga" by
    Birch. All you need is a floor (and a carpet or mat for some
    exercises).

    Paul

    "Thad O" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > A while ago i would go to a gym, but gave up because the
    > gym was too far away ( I spent more time driving than
    > exercising ). unfortunately there is no gym that is close
    > by. What's worse is that I don't have room for any kind of
    > equipment ( I don't have romm for the stuff I already
    > have, like my books ). Even if I did, I live in an
    > apartment, so something like a stairmaster is out because
    > of the noise.
    >
    > Aside from that outside the gym, the exercising I do tends
    > to be uneven. What I would like to do is make a regiment (
    > actually two so that if for some reason I can't do one, I
    > can do the other ), which increases my flexibility and
    > general strenth so that I can do my main exercises (
    > wlaking with a heavy backpack and bicycling ) for longer.
    >
    > For example, when bicycling for a while my trapezium get
    > sore. So I need to get in some exercises that increase
    > strenth there. Flexibilty at this point is very bad too.
    >
    > In particular I wish to strenthen the secondary and
    > tertiary muscles used to support these activitys,
    > especially to make up for over development of the
    > principle muscles.
    >
    > So can anyone recommend some good website/books that will
    > allow me to do this? Thanks
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    Thad O <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >Aside from that outside the gym, the exercising I do tends
    >to be uneven. What I would like to do is make a regiment (
    >actually two so that if for some reason I can't do one, I
    >can do the other ), which increases my flexibility and
    >general strenth so that I can do my main exercises (
    >wlaking with a heavy backpack and bicycling ) for longer.
    >
    >For example, when bicycling for a while my trapezium get
    >sore. So I need to get in some exercises that increase
    >strenth there. Flexibilty at this point is very bad too.

    Not knowing what a trapezium was I went and looked it up, it
    is apparently a bone in your hand. I assume you mean
    trapezius instead.

    Lack of development of trapezius muscles should not affect
    your cycling very much, especially if you ride on the road.
    Before you lay on a bunch of upper-body strength work, I
    would focus on bike fit and flexibility. Any flexibility
    regimen that you actually stick to will probably work -
    yoga, stretching, whatever.

    Bike fitting is a service that you pay for from a qualified
    fitter. Bike fit is not what you get when a pimply teenager
    in a bike shop has you stand over a bike for 2 seconds and
    pronounces it your size. If you are not sure where to go
    for it, start by asking a cycling coach or other
    knowledgeable riders in a local club. You can also get fit
    by mail if no better option exists (eg, wobblenaught.com).
    But for people with bike fit problems, actually talking to
    an experienced fitter and letting them see you on the bike
    can yield better results.

    >In particular I wish to strenthen the secondary and
    >tertiary muscles used to support these activitys,
    >especially to make up for over development of the
    >principle muscles.

    I suggest not worrying too much about the upper body
    exercises if your goal is to ride. Focusing on flexibility
    (stretching) and core exercises (eg, ab crunches and back
    extensions) should be enough for a typical recreational
    cyclist. In my experience upper back/neck/shoulder pain in
    otherwise healthy cyclists is usually a matter of bike fit
    or failure to relax on the bike. Excessive reach and
    "handlebar death-grip" are likely culprits. If you are tense
    on the bike you'll need to learn to periodically check your
    body as you ride, feel your hands, arms, shoulders, neck and
    relax. Recheck frequently, this is something you can learn
    to do as second nature, like thinking about hot spots on
    your feet when hiking.

    Obviously your upper body condition is more relevant to
    hiking, but I think you still won't go wrong by focusing
    first on core and flexibility. Also, if hiking is
    uncomfortable, the first thing to do is lighten your load
    and get more miles in with less weight. You can learn a lot
    from Ray Jardine even if you don't like to sleep in a pile
    of leaves. :)

    You really do not need ANY equipment to do core and
    flexibility exercises.

    --Paul
     
  4. Julie Bove

    Julie Bove Guest

    "Thad O" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > A while ago i would go to a gym, but gave up because the
    > gym was too far away ( I spent more time driving than
    > exercising ). unfortunately there is no gym that is close
    > by. What's worse is that I don't have room for any kind of
    > equipment ( I don't have romm for the stuff I already
    > have, like my books ). Even if I did, I live in an
    > apartment, so something like a stairmaster is out because
    > of the noise.
    >
    > Aside from that outside the gym, the exercising I do tends
    > to be uneven. What I would like to do is make a regiment (
    > actually two so that if for some reason I can't do one, I
    > can do the other ), which increases my flexibility and
    > general strenth so that I can do my main exercises (
    > wlaking with a heavy backpack and bicycling ) for longer.
    >
    > For example, when bicycling for a while my trapezium get
    > sore. So I need to get in some exercises that increase
    > strenth there. Flexibilty at this point is very bad too.
    >
    > In particular I wish to strenthen the secondary and
    > tertiary muscles used to support these activitys,
    > especially to make up for over development of the
    > principle muscles.
    >
    > So can anyone recommend some good website/books that will
    > allow me to do this?

    I recommend any books by Joyce Vedral. I have the 12 Minute
    Workout. It recommends plenty of exercises that can be done
    with a pair of lightweight dumbbells. I have several sets of
    dumbbells in assorted sizes. These are great because you can
    easily switch from one weight to another very quickly. But
    they do take up a little space. I then got a set of
    dumbbells with removable weights. They take up a little less
    space. If you haven't got the space for even those things,
    buy one of those stretchy exercise bands. It takes up very
    little space, or you can even drape it over the back of a
    chair or some such thing.

    --
    Type 2 http://users.bestweb.net/~jbove/
     
  5. Julie Bove

    Julie Bove Guest

    "Paul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I would suggest Yoga. If you are persistent it will make
    > you stronger and more flexible. I like the book "Power
    > Yoga" by Birch. All you need is a floor (and a carpet or
    > mat for some exercises).

    A person who isn't very flexible might need Yoga blocks and
    a strap. I can do some positions without them, but need them
    for many others.

    --
    Type 2 http://users.bestweb.net/~jbove/
     
  6. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 12:21:30 GMT, Thad O
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Even if I did, I live in an apartment, so something like a
    >stairmaster is out because of the noise.

    If it's not a ground-level apartment, you've got a built-in
    stairmaster.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  7. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 12:21:30 GMT, Thad O <[email protected]>
    from Allegiance Internet - Greenbelt, MD wrote:

    >Aside from that outside the gym, the exercising I do tends
    >to be uneven. What I would like to do is make a regiment (
    >actually two so that if for some reason I can't do one, I
    >can do the other ), which increases my flexibility and
    >general strenth so that I can do my main exercises (
    >wlaking with a heavy backpack and bicycling ) for longer.

    Yoga.

    No equipment needed.

    --
    [email protected]
    Imagine the piece as a set of disconnected events.
    73
     
  8. R15757

    R15757 Guest

    Thad olczyk wrote in part:

    << For example, when bicycling for a while my trapezium get
    sore. So I need to get in some exercises that increase
    strenth there. Flexibilty at this point is very bad too. >>

    You got it all wrong man. It's not lack of strength that
    is your real problem, but lack of endurance that's killin'
    ya. Your back and neck muscles just get tired out after a
    while. Best thing to fix that is to go on several long
    rides and before too long your muscles will adapt, and the
    pain will go away. (This is assuming that your bike fits
    you reasonably well, and that you are properly hydrated
    and fueled.)

    Also can't hurt to relax your grip and consciously relax
    your upper body whie riding, get a pull-up bar, and do some
    dips, but none of this will solve your endurance problem.

    Robert
     
  9. Evon

    Evon Guest

    Try Pilates.
    "Thad O" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > A while ago i would go to a gym, but gave up because the
    > gym was too far away ( I spent more time driving than
    > exercising ). unfortunately there is no gym that is close
    > by. What's worse is that I don't have room for any kind of
    > equipment ( I don't have romm for the stuff I already
    > have, like my books ). Even if I did, I live in an
    > apartment, so something like a stairmaster is out because
    > of the noise.
    >
    > Aside from that outside the gym, the exercising I do tends
    > to be uneven. What I would like to do is make a regiment (
    > actually two so that if for some reason I can't do one, I
    > can do the other ), which increases my flexibility and
    > general strenth so that I can do my main exercises (
    > wlaking with a heavy backpack and bicycling ) for longer.
    >
    > For example, when bicycling for a while my trapezium get
    > sore. So I need to get in some exercises that increase
    > strenth there. Flexibilty at this point is very bad too.
    >
    > In particular I wish to strenthen the secondary and
    > tertiary muscles used to support these activitys,
    > especially to make up for over development of the
    > principle muscles.
    >
    > So can anyone recommend some good website/books that will
    > allow me to do this? Thanks
     
  10. Thad O

    Thad O Guest

    A while ago I asking for help in designing in an exercise
    program. The responses ranged from awful to OK with nothing
    really great. Some of the responses raised more questions.
    So I thought I would repost my question. Clarifying it, and
    expanding on it.

    I've also added misc.fitness.misc. After looking at the
    answers to the questions, I realized that while the diabetes
    and bicycling were a good place to ask my question, alone
    they were not able to provide an overall perspective which I
    believe this group can provide.

    But before I go on, there were a few answers which were...
    well stupid. I'm tired of the people who post things which
    are wrong ( in this case some were plain dangerous ). I
    guess some guys have to make up for other... shortcomings,
    by pulling a Cliff Claven act. So, before I get to my
    question I am going to call those people on their stupidity.
    For those who want to skip ahead, I will be marking the end
    of this part by <===========>.

    Of the stupid claims, probably the most stupid claim is that
    climbing stairs is the same exercise as using a stairmaster.
    Aside from the fact that stairclimbing alone is not going to
    promote *all around* fitness ( thus not answering my
    question, just some garbage someone spews to show how
    *smart* they are ), stairs are not the same as a ( high
    quality ) stairmaster. Any orthopedist will tell you that
    stairs produce much more wear and tear on the knees. Given
    that bicycling can also create lots of wear and tear on the
    knees ( mostly for people whose knees are already in bad
    shape ), this advice was especially stupid. Hopefully people
    googling the original post will realize just how stupid
    these poster are, before they blow out their knees.

    The other stupid claim contends that upper body conditioning
    is not useful in bicycling. Two arguments were used to
    explain my upper body fatigue (when riding): gripping the
    handlebars too tightly and a poor bicycle fit. Both stupid
    for simple reasons.

    Frankly I know that the fit if my bike is not as good as it
    could be, because my body is misproportioned. But it is as
    good as it is going to get ( mainly because I don't have the
    time to get a custom fit ). I bought it from Turin Cycling,
    one of the premier bicycling shops in the Chicagoland area.
    They know how to fit a bike. I've been riding for 30 years.
    I know how to fit a bike. Just before I bought the bike I
    reviewed books and articles on fitting bikes to make sure
    that I remembered things right.

    As for gripping handlebars too tightly; I've been cycling
    for thirty years. I know how to grip a bike. Not only do I
    have all my experience ( once again 30 years ), but in that
    time I did a lot of reading, talking to other cyclists, etc
    to improve my form. From the way I have ridden in the past,
    it seemed like I pretty much had it down, being able to
    outride ( both in speed and distance ) most of my friends.

    Fact is that bicycling requires but does not create upper
    body strength. I checked out several books and they all
    agree on this point. These books range from publications by
    "Bicycling" to Eugene Sloane's "Complete Book of Bicycling".
    The books are quite specific, the lion's share of your
    weight is carried by your arms. Can't remember the number
    that they gave as a percentage, but I would say that at
    least 60% of your weight is on your arms. ( For those who
    don't know, but are curious, that's because the more weight
    on your butt the more impediment there is to smooth
    pedalling. I know not a lot, but how much do you gain by
    shaving your legs? )

    In the end, I believe that the idiots that put this forward,
    are just plain lazy and don't want to do any upper body
    conditioning. So instead they make excuses about why it's
    not necessary. Even to those who are willing to do it.

    <===========>

    My question(s):

    I used to go to a gym, but it turned out that I spent more
    time driving to and fro then I did in the gym. Checking
    the situation out, there are no gyms which are
    conveniently located. I live in a group environment, so
    noisy equipment is out, and since I have very very little
    room ( not enough free room to do an exercise video ) a
    lot of equipment is out.

    On top of that, the last few years have been rough
    healthwise so I need to basically start from the bottom. In
    particular, I want to build up to the point where I can do
    much more serious cycling again. Like going out and doing a
    century ( which means 100 miles in one day/trip ).

    Another thing that I am looking for is balance (and
    comprehensiveness). In the past I've eschewed balance and it
    cost me. Ignore the Achilles's tendon and cause calf
    problems. Ignore the ILTB ( though I really don't know how
    to not ignore
    it ) and wind up with knee problems. So I'm looking for a
    workout that will develop me in a balanced way.

    To quote one book: "Fitness is many things to many
    people. To us you are as fit as the weakest link in your
    fitness chain."

    I gotten to the point where you have a rough idea of what I
    want. Let me now state the main question that I am asking.

    *** Can people recommend books/web sites/anything else that
    will help me design an exercise plan that meets the above
    criteria, plus a few other things below. ***

    The things I expect such a plan to do is to enable me to
    build up suppleness/flexibility, strength and endurance.

    It should allow me to miss a few days.( As few as possible,
    but when you get older, there are these things called
    jobs...) It should also allow substitutions of exercises, (
    So if I can't do exercise 1 to work on a bicep because of
    injury, I do exercise 29 instead. ) and create rotations (
    where some muscles are given a rest on some days ) so that I
    don't overexercise.

    So now a few questions/comments on some of the more positive
    things that came from my original post.

    While I don't disagree with the general idea of doing Yoga,
    it seems much of the time the exercises are just thrown out.
    I'm looking for a plan ( comprehensive workout/with a good
    rotation of exercises ). I suspect Tai Chi might be better
    for me though.

    Someone suggested I get weights ( 1 -10 lbs ) or
    "straps"/bands. Can someone talk about the
    advantages/disadvantages of weights vs bands? For weights,
    which are preferable dumbells type weights, or the kind that
    attach to your wrist/ankles?

    A final comment. Someone recommended books written by Joyce
    Vendral. I've checked out a couple in the library, and they
    seem to be more focused to women. Also I'm a little put off
    by the way she spammed some of her books on Amazon.

    Thanks.
     
  11. >As for gripping handlebars too tightly; I've been cycling
    >for thirty years. I know how to grip a bike.

    Maybe not. Possibly you could grip less and ride more.

    I've found it easy to ride a bicycle.

    Sure, I was not smooth at first. But time marched on.

    Eventually I reached my current level of perfection.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY
    MIND_______________________ ------------------"Buddy Holly,
    the Texas Elvis"------------------ __________306.350.357.38-
    >>[email protected]__________
     
  12. Generally, advice you get on a news group is worth exactly
    what you paid for
    it.

    If it happens to be worth more, you are in luck. Usually on
    this NG that is the case. Your job is to sort through the
    advice given and find what applies to you, ignoring what you
    think is not correct. So, why are you then berating a group
    of folks who tried to help you?

    How about your going to a sports trainer and actually paying
    for advice?

    That way you will think the advice to be of a great
    deal of value!

    http://members.aol.com/foxcondorsrvtns (Colorado
    rental condo)

    http://members.aol.com/dnvrfox (Family Web Page)
     
  13. Pbwalther

    Pbwalther Guest

    >Given that bicycling can also create lots of wear and tear
    >on the knees

    Really? From my own experience and people I have talked to
    and my reading, bicycling done properly is very knee
    friendly. I have even had friends with knee injuries whose
    rehabilitation featured cycling as a way of building up the
    knees. Sure you can beat up your knees cycling, if you push
    really big gears or something, but normally no.

    >The other stupid claim contends that upper body
    >conditioning is not useful in bicycling. Two arguments were
    >used to explain my upper body fatigue (when riding):

    Well upper body conditioning is useful I suppose, but
    cycling does not really require much there. I have ridden
    plenty of centuries and I have never had any upper body
    fatigue from cycling. Now my lats do come into play some
    when I climb hills, but that is about it. Doing a few lat
    pulldowns or one armed rows would almost certainly meet any
    requirement there.

    >The books are quite specific, the lion's share of your
    >weight is carried by your arms. Can't remember the number
    >that they gave as a percentage, but I would say that at
    >least 60%

    I have heard the other way around 40% arms and 60% legs and
    rear. For many people, who ride with handle bars a little
    high I would think the mix would be 20%/80% or even more.

    >but how much do you gain by shaving your legs?

    I have read and heard that the leg shaving benefit is not
    for aerodynamics. If one crashes and gets road rash, it is
    far easier to clean and bandage the wound if you don't have
    a lot of hair all over the place. Racers, who generally have
    road rash in various stages of healing, tend to routinely
    shave their legs for this reason.

    >In the end, I believe that the idiots that put this
    >forward, are just plain lazy and don't want to do any upper
    >body conditioning.

    Well, calling people idiots is not the greatest way to get
    help is it? It strikes me as being counterproductive.

    As you know from above, I don't think cycling requires much
    upper body conditioning. But having a body that is in some
    kind of shape is nice. Cycling isn't going to help upper
    body conditioning. What I do is a weight lifting routine to
    work on the major upper body muscle groups and on the
    abdominals. It isn't rocket science to come up with
    something.

    >Another thing that I am looking for is balance (and
    >comprehensiveness)

    It stikes me that you have some pretty specific needs and
    you can either hire a trainer to tailor a program for you or
    you can do the research and cook up your own. I doubt that I
    have the information about you to even know what to suggest.
    Plus, given the fact that you seem to regard people who give
    you advice that you are not impressed with "idiots", well I
    doubt that even if I came up with the perfect program for
    you that you would appreciate it.

    Good luck by the way.
     
  14. On 18 Jun 2004 13:41:39 GMT, [email protected] (Pbwalther) wrote:

    >Really? From my own experience and people I have talked to
    >and my reading, bicycling done properly is very knee
    >friendly. I have even had friends with knee injuries whose
    >rehabilitation featured cycling as a way of building up the
    >knees. Sure you can beat up your knees cycling, if you push
    >really big gears or something, but normally no.

    Agreed. I have a knee that has a fair amount of damage to
    it, but bicycling is given the all clear. Torn meniscus
    (sp?), prearthritic spot, small foreign object behind knee
    cap, etc., but no problem on the bike. OTOH when I asked if
    I could play soccer, the MD said he was of mixed emotions.
    On one hand, he could use the income...

    Curtis L. Russell Odenton, MD (USA) Just someone on
    two wheels...
     
  15. Cathy Kearns

    Cathy Kearns Guest

    "Curtis L. Russell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On 18 Jun 2004 13:41:39 GMT, [email protected]
    > (Pbwalther) wrote:
    >
    > >Really? From my own experience and people I have talked
    > >to and my
    reading,
    > >bicycling done properly is very knee friendly. I have
    > >even had friends
    with
    > >knee injuries whose rehabilitation featured cycling as a
    > >way of building
    up the
    > >knees. Sure you can beat up your knees cycling, if you
    > >push really big
    gears
    > >or something, but normally no.
    >
    > Agreed. I have a knee that has a fair amount of damage to
    > it, but bicycling is given the all clear. Torn meniscus
    > (sp?), prearthritic spot, small foreign object behind knee
    > cap, etc., but no problem on the bike. OTOH when I asked
    > if I could play soccer, the MD said he was of mixed
    > emotions. On one hand, he could use the income...

    I used to use my bicycle as my only form of mobility when
    I would hurt my knees playing soccer. Ride the kids to
    school instead of driving and walking them in. Ride to
    errands instead of walk. Knees got better faster, and I
    hobbled less. Now that I gave up soccer bicycling keeps my
    knees in shape for tennis. Knees seems a bit sore, start
    riding more...
     
  16. Badger_south

    Badger_south Guest

    On 18 Jun 2004 13:41:39 GMT, [email protected] (Pbwalther) wrote:

    >>Given that bicycling can also create lots of wear and tear
    >>on the knees
    >
    >Really? From my own experience and people I have talked to
    >and my reading, bicycling done properly is very knee
    >friendly. I have even had friends with knee injuries whose
    >rehabilitation featured cycling as a way of building up
    >the knees.

    I can chip in and say biking can also rehab the hip(s). I've
    had a hip injury for several years and the biking has helped
    immensely, not only in the long run, but also per session.

    -B
     
  17. Misnomer

    Misnomer Guest

    The best excercise for building up endurance on a bike is to
    ride the bike!

    I am out of shape, and I can think of a bunch more excuses
    for being in this sorry shape - when infact its just a
    matter of doing and being motivated.

    Walking - get your arms moving! Excercising, - move the
    couch out of the way - involve your group if you have to. I
    tried a pilates video - wow - it excercised muscles that I
    didn't even know I had.

    So, get motivated and just do it! Movement is important!

    take care Liz

    On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 04:41:06 GMT, Thad O
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I used to go to a gym, but it turned out that I spent more
    >time driving to and fro then I did in the gym. Checking
    >the situation out, there are no gyms which are
    >conveniently located. I live in a group environment, so
    >noisy equipment is out, and since I have very very little
    >room ( not enough free room to do an exercise video ) a
    >lot of equipment is out.
    >
    >On top of that, the last few years have been rough
    >healthwise so I need to basically start from the bottom. In
    >particular, I want to build up to the point where I can do
    >much more serious cycling again. Like going out and doing a
    >century ( which means 100 miles in one day/trip ).
     
  18. Julie Bove

    Julie Bove Guest

    "Thad O" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    <snip>

    > The things I expect such a plan to do is to enable me to
    > build up suppleness/flexibility, strength and endurance.

    While I can't address your other questions, I can answer som
    of those below. Joyce Vedral puts out some good books for
    using weights. One is called "The 12 Minute Total Body
    Workout". The exercises use light weights and techniques
    that really work your muscles hard!

    > It should allow me to miss a few days.( As few as
    > possible, but when you get older, there are these things
    > called jobs...) It should also allow substitutions of
    > exercises, ( So if I can't do exercise 1 to work on a
    > bicep because of injury, I do exercise 29 instead. ) and
    > create rotations ( where some muscles are given a rest on
    > some days ) so that I don't overexercise.

    The above book will do just that. You will be working
    different parts of the body each day.
    >
    > So now a few questions/comments on some of the more
    > positive things that came from my original post.
    >
    > While I don't disagree with the general idea of doing
    > Yoga, it seems much of the time the exercises are just
    > thrown out. I'm looking for a plan ( comprehensive
    > workout/with a good rotation of exercises ). I suspect Tai
    > Chi might be better for me though.

    I haven't done Tai Chi. I do some Yoga, but mainly because
    the particular stretches/poses seem to help me.
    >
    > Someone suggested I get weights ( 1 -10 lbs ) or
    > "straps"/bands. Can someone talk about the
    > advantages/disadvantages of weights vs bands? For weights,
    > which are preferable dumbells type weights, or the kind
    > that attach to your wrist/ankles?

    I wouldn't advise wrist weights. I think they'd do nothing
    more than strain your wrists. Dumbells can be used in a
    variety of ways to work the arms, chest, shoulders and back.
    They can also be used for some leg exercises if you are
    adept enough. I am not that adept and prefer the ankle
    weights. Ankle weights are useful for leg lifts. I wouldn't
    advise walking around with them on, which is what many
    people think is the thing to do. For some reason, they think
    that by strapping these things on, they can go about their
    day and get added excerise. What they are really doing is
    just risking injury to their ankles. To use these weights
    (or any weights) properly, form is very important. Not only
    can the wrong form cause injury, but you might not be
    working the muscles you intend to be working if you don't do
    the exercise properly.

    I have a variety of weights. I started with a pair of 3
    pound dumbbells and worked up to 10 pound ones. Those got
    too easy for me. I then bought a set of dumbells with
    removeable discs and bought additional disks so I can keep
    adding more weight as needed. Now technically, you can do a
    variety of exercises, adding or removing the weights as
    needed, but it's a pain to do and time consuming. For that
    reason, I also keep my lighter weights handy. I find that I
    can use pretty heavy weights for biceps curls, but not as
    heavy for triceps kickbacks, and for shoulder exercises, I
    need lighter still.

    I have several pairs of ankle weights. I started with light
    ones, but quickly outgrew them. I bought heavier ones, but
    over the years have acquied additional sets, mainly because
    they were purchased while I was on vacation. I try not to
    travel with the weights, but sometimes I need them and was
    forced to buy them to give my bad knee some relief. So now,
    when I need to up the amount of weight I'm using, I simply
    add more weights to my legs, or hook additional weights to
    the ones I have on.

    Exercise bands are great for travel because they're small
    and lightweight. I also use mine at home occasionally
    because they seem to work the muscles in a slightly
    different way than weights do and seeminly simple exercies
    with them can really challenge the muscles! The main
    drawback with the bands is that as you grow stronger, you'll
    need stronger and stronger bands, so your muscles remain
    challenged. I found this to be true with the weights as
    well. But if you get the weights where you can add discs,
    you can up the weight inexpensively. The bands are a little
    more costly, and wear out much quicker than weights will.
    Actually weights are pretty indestructable. I've had mine
    for many years. My mom's had a little accident though. She
    had the plastic dumbells filled with sand, and one of my
    friends dropped one. It landed on the end on a tile floor
    and some sand leaked out. So while this type *can* sustain
    damage, it's not likely. My daughter has the cushy kind that
    are metal, covered with a comfortable foam. Or you can get
    the el cheapo iron ones. I can't imagine how you could
    damage those! With weights, the sky's the limit when it
    comes to increasing the weight. With exercise bands, you can
    only get so much resistance. You can get stronger and
    stronger bands, but you'll eventually top out and not be
    able to get any more of a challenge to the muscles.
    >
    > A final comment. Someone recommended books written by
    > Joyce Vendral. I've checked out a couple in the library,
    > and they seem to be more focused to women. Also I'm a
    > little put off by the way she spammed some of her books
    > on Amazon.

    That was me. And I recommended the book again. Yes, the
    books are focused on women because she *is* a woman. But my
    husband also uses her techniques, using heavier weights. And
    how could you spam books on Amazon? Amazon sells books,
    among other things.

    --
    Type 2 http://users.bestweb.net/~jbove/
     
  19. Bj

    Bj Guest

    Why don't you just ante up & pay for a couple of consults
    with a p.t. &/or athletic trainer. You have very particular
    requirements & likes & dislikes & probably won't be
    satisfied with anything you can cobble together from books
    or web sites. bj

    "Thad O" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > A while ago I asking for help in designing in an exercise
    > program. The responses ranged from awful to OK with
    > nothing really great. Some of the responses raised more
    > questions. So I thought I would repost my question.
    > Clarifying it, and expanding on it. .....
     
  20. Bj

    Bj Guest

    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > weights, the sky's the limit when it comes to increasing
    > the weight. With
    exercise bands, you can only get so much resistance. You
    can get stronger and stronger bands, but you'll eventually
    top out and not be able to get any more of a challenge to
    the muscles.
    >

    True, the bands only go so "high" in resistance, but you can
    double up on them, and also they get more resisty as they
    are stretched. I've done both, to get tweaks on the
    resistance I need for a particular exercise. bj
     
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