Experience with Bianchi San Remo?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Archer, Jun 4, 2003.

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  1. Archer

    Archer Guest

    I am researching for a new bike, and the Bianchi San Remo is one of them on my short list. I have
    already seen comments from people who have ridden the others on my list, but none on the San Remo.

    If anybody out there has experience with the San Remo, how was it? I'm particularly interested in
    the durability, reliability and maintainability of the bike, in relation to your riding style. I
    don't bother asking about the ride becasue that's such a personal thing that I might love one
    which you hate.

    Please not that I'm not asking how the bike might work for *me*, but rather how it works for
    *you* <GGGG>

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
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  2. Joe

    Joe Guest

    I have a 1999 San Remo. I has Campy Mirage components,
    30/40/50 crank, Shimano Acera cantis, Mavic MA-2 wheels.

    The bike has held up well, just normal maintenance needed.

    I have made these changes:

    Replaced original seat with Terry Fly at time of purchase. Replaced Shimano brake pads (eating my
    rims) with Kool-Stop salmon pads. Replaced 30 chainring with 26, and it shifts fine. Added a rack
    and panniers - no problem with heel clearance.

    I use the bike for day rides in hilly terrain and light touring.

    If I had it to do over, I would get a bike with Shimano wheels and wide range cassette, but keep the
    Campy Ergo levers and FD, and use a Campy long cage RD. I want more low range on the cassette, and I
    don't need the gears spaced so close together. I might get a
    30/41/46 crank. I rarely use the 50 ring.

    You might want to look at a Volpe, if you are interested in even light touring.

    Joe
     
  3. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I have a 1999 San Remo. I has Campy Mirage components,
    > 30/40/50 crank, Shimano Acera cantis, Mavic MA-2 wheels.
    >
    > The bike has held up well, just normal maintenance needed.
    >
    > I have made these changes:
    >
    > Replaced original seat with Terry Fly at time of purchase. Replaced Shimano brake pads (eating my
    > rims) with Kool-Stop salmon pads. Replaced 30 chainring with 26, and it shifts fine. Added a rack
    > and panniers - no problem with heel clearance.
    >
    > I use the bike for day rides in hilly terrain and light touring.
    >
    > If I had it to do over, I would get a bike with Shimano wheels and wide range cassette, but keep
    > the Campy Ergo levers and FD, and use a Campy long cage RD. I want more low range on the cassette,
    > and I don't need the gears spaced so close together. I might get a
    > 26/36/46 crank. I rarely use the 50 ring.
    >
    > You might want to look at a Volpe, if you are interested in even light touring.

    That is one of the bikes on my list, along with the Fuji Touring and Specialized Sequoiah Expert.

    Thanks for the comments. I had seen people say they were all good bikes, but had only seen comments
    from actual owners on the Volpe, Touring and Sequoiah.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  4. > If anybody out there has experience with the San Remo, how was it? I'm particularly interested in
    > the durability, reliability and maintainability of the bike, in relation to your riding style.

    Even such things as reliability are greatly influenced by the dealer that sets it up; wheels, in
    particular, need to be tensioned properly and pre-stressed. Sometimes wheels as they come from the
    factory are fine, sometimes they are decidedly not, and a good shop will recognize this and deal
    with it accordingly.

    The fit issues are also going to vary from shop to shop, so I'd suggest you look for a combination
    of shop + bike that's most appropriate, not just the bike itself.

    And, of course, being a totally biased TREK dealers, I'd also suggest you take a look at the TREK
    520 model (if you're looking for an indestructible "classic" touring bike) or even consider an XO1
    CycloCross bike with different tires (we make that change fairly often).

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  5. I have a Bianchi San Remo - had it for about 18 months. It was about a year old when I got it. Apart
    from paint jobbie, I think the spec is the same as current model (Campag Veloce/Mirage mix).

    I love it. Only changes I've made are to put a Terry's Liberator TiLite saddle on it 'coz being
    female, the saddle that was on it was uncomfortable for me, a rear rack and mudguards on it so I
    don't get mud-splattered in the rain on the uneven country lanes hereabouts and I can carry a load
    on it too if out for any extended period.

    Durability, reliability & maintainability great. Have replaced the chain and I keep it clean & oiled
    and it's fine (well, personal bike mechanic a.k.a. my husband) and I can see the bike lasting me
    many a long year to come. It's riding very well on the bumpy country lanes that are found in my part
    of the world. Took it to Italy last summer and cycled it there and possibly to Germany this summer.

    I love my Bianchi!

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Clean up the waste & get rid of the trapped wind to send a reply

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  6. Kevin

    Kevin Guest

    An interesting idea, XO-1 for touring. The Trek site mentions XO-1 as best and 520 as better. Not
    sure what just "good" is. I need to expore this subject myself.

    No matter what I decide, I'm not sure if it is worth putting a S&S Coupler on this price range bike.
    The installation and case is the price of the bike. But without easy disassembly, travel is
    difficult and much more expensive.

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > take a look at the TREK 520 model (if you're looking for an indestructible "classic" touring bike)
    > or even consider an XO1 CycloCross bike with different tires (we make that change fairly often).
    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  7. Andy Kriger

    Andy Kriger Guest

    archer <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in news:MPG.1947b87bcdf71ea85 @news.cox.net:

    > I am researching for a new bike, and the Bianchi San Remo is one of them on my short list. I have
    > already seen comments from people who have ridden the others on my list, but none on the San Remo.
    >
    > If anybody out there has experience with the San Remo, how was it? I'm particularly interested in
    > the durability, reliability and maintainability of the bike, in relation to your riding style. I
    > don't bother asking about the ride becasue that's such a personal thing that I might love one
    > which you hate.
    >
    > Please not that I'm not asking how the bike might work for *me*, but rather how it works for
    > *you* <GGGG>
    >

    This is a great bike - I love my 2001. Very durable, rides well for long distances, handles trail
    riding (dunno about lots of mud and muck, but it's done well in packed dirt/sand/bits of mud).

    I opted for Time mtb pedals and have since added a Blackburn Mtn rack (with Jannd panniers - plenty
    of heel clearance) and Planet Bike full fenders (only issue there is that there's only 1 eyelet on
    the rear drops so you need a longer screw to hold both fenders and rack). The saddle was good enough
    for me (but unfortunately I had to replace it when it got stolen).

    They're still using Avid Shorty 6 brakes. I would ask your shop to install Kool Stop Salmon pads in
    place of the Avid pads (which can squeal quite a bit).

    Good luck and enjoy a
     
  8. > An interesting idea, XO-1 for touring. The Trek site mentions XO-1 as
    best
    > and 520 as better. Not sure what just "good" is. I need to expore this subject myself.

    The XO1 is an extremely mis-understood bike in terms of its potential. In my perfect world, you put
    28c road tires on it and call it a "Utility" bike, something useful for touring, cyclecross,
    commuting and maybe as a rain bike. To pigeonhole it as a cyclocross machine is very short-sighted.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles www.ChainReaction.com

    "Kevin" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > An interesting idea, XO-1 for touring. The Trek site mentions XO-1 as
    best
    > and 520 as better. Not sure what just "good" is. I need to expore this subject myself.
    >
    > No matter what I decide, I'm not sure if it is worth putting a S&S Coupler on this price range
    > bike. The installation and case is the price of the bike. But without easy disassembly, travel is
    > difficult and much more expensive.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > take a look at the TREK 520 model (if you're looking for an
    indestructible
    > > "classic" touring bike) or even consider an XO1 CycloCross bike with different tires (we make
    > > that change fairly often).
    > >
    > > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
    > >
    >
     
  9. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > archer <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in news:MPG.1947b87bcdf71ea85 @news.cox.net:
    >
    > > I am researching for a new bike, and the Bianchi San Remo is one of them on my short list. I
    > > have already seen comments from people who have ridden the others on my list, but none on the
    > > San Remo.
    > >
    > > If anybody out there has experience with the San Remo, how was it? I'm particularly interested
    > > in the durability, reliability and maintainability of the bike, in relation to your riding
    > > style. I don't bother asking about the ride becasue that's such a personal thing that I might
    > > love one which you hate.
    > >
    > > Please not that I'm not asking how the bike might work for *me*, but rather how it works for
    > > *you* <GGGG>
    > >
    >
    > This is a great bike - I love my 2001. Very durable, rides well for long distances, handles trail
    > riding (dunno about lots of mud and muck, but it's done well in packed dirt/sand/bits of mud).
    >
    > I opted for Time mtb pedals and have since added a Blackburn Mtn rack (with Jannd panniers -
    > plenty of heel clearance) and Planet Bike full fenders (only issue there is that there's only 1
    > eyelet on the rear drops so you need a longer screw to hold both fenders and rack). The saddle was
    > good enough for me (but unfortunately I had to replace it when it got stolen).
    >
    > They're still using Avid Shorty 6 brakes. I would ask your shop to install Kool Stop Salmon pads
    > in place of the Avid pads (which can squeal quite a bit).

    Thanks for the comments; have you noticed any difference in the stopping power with the
    different pads?

    > Good luck and enjoy

    I plan to!!

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  10. Andy Kriger

    Andy Kriger Guest

    David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >> archer <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in news:MPG.1947b87bcdf71ea85 @news.cox.net:
    >>
    >> > I am researching for a new bike, and the Bianchi San Remo is one of them on my short list. I
    >> > have already seen comments from people who have ridden the others on my list, but none on the
    >> > San Remo.
    >> >
    >> > If anybody out there has experience with the San Remo, how was it? I'm particularly interested
    >> > in the durability, reliability and maintainability of the bike, in relation to your riding
    >> > style. I don't bother asking about the ride becasue that's such a personal thing that I might
    >> > love one which you hate.
    >> >
    >> > Please not that I'm not asking how the bike might work for *me*, but rather how it works for
    >> > *you* <GGGG>
    >> >
    >>
    >> This is a great bike - I love my 2001. Very durable, rides well for long distances, handles trail
    >> riding (dunno about lots of mud and muck, but it's done well in packed dirt/sand/bits of mud).
    >>
    >> I opted for Time mtb pedals and have since added a Blackburn Mtn rack (with Jannd panniers -
    >> plenty of heel clearance) and Planet Bike full fenders (only issue there is that there's only 1
    >> eyelet on the rear drops so you need a longer screw to hold both fenders and rack). The saddle
    >> was good enough for me (but unfortunately I had to replace it when it got stolen).
    >>
    >> They're still using Avid Shorty 6 brakes. I would ask your shop to install Kool Stop Salmon pads
    >> in place of the Avid pads (which can squeal quite a bit).
    >
    > Thanks for the comments; have you noticed any difference in the stopping power with the
    > different pads?
    >
    >
    >> Good luck and enjoy
    >
    > I plan to!!
    >

    Haven't actually got them installed yet :) But I bought them after much research in newsgroups and
    message boards about problems with Avid pads.
     
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