Experts say low carb fad over



Experts say low-carb craze may be over

By MARGARET STAFFORD, Associated Press Writer

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) - About a year ago, Dave Champlin and his two
roommates lived in what their friends at the University of Missouri
called the House of Fat. At a combined weight of 890 pounds, the three
decided to try the Atkins diet. By sticking to the low-carb,
high-protein diet, Champlin lost about 45 pounds and his roommates
each lost between 50 and 60 pounds.

Despite being pleased with the results, all three were off the diet by
this past summer and have gained back some of the weight. Champlin,
23, and his friends exemplify why many diet and food industry experts
are declaring the low-carb diet craze over.

"It just got kind of tiresome," Champlin said. "Eating the same thing
over and over. It was monotonous."

A study by NPD Group, an independent marketing information company,
found that the percentage of American adults on any low-carb diet in
2004 peaked at 9.1 percent in February and dropped to 4.9 percent by
early November.

Further, it said only one of four people surveyed was significantly
cutting carbs and "virtually none" were reducing carbs as much as the
diets recommended.

That means many companies that rode the low-carb wave are either out
of business or refocusing their strategies.

One example: MGP Ingredients Inc. of Atchison, Kan., which profited
from the low-carb trend, earlier this month announced it was cutting
its fiscal 2005 per-share earnings forecast by more than half - from
$1.08 to no more than 50 cents.

The reason is reduced demand for its specialty proteins and starches
used to reduce carbohydrates in foods. MGP said low-carb demand had
peaked, and it did not expect it to return to anywhere near the level
that sparked a 123 percent increase in sales in the third quarter of
fiscal 2004.

MGP always expected the low-carb demand to cool, but it happened more
quickly than anticipated, spokesman Steve Pickman said.

"We expected at least to continue at its strong level for the next 18
to 36 months," Pickman said. "We by no means feel low-carb is dead,
but it's declined to a much lower plateau than we or the industry
expected."

While MGP's future is not threatened, many smaller businesses based on
low-carb products have closed their doors, and larger companies that
introduced low-carb foods are changing strategies.

American Italian Pasta, the nation's largest producer of dry pasta,
reported a net loss of $12.2 million, or 67 cents per share, in the
second quarter of this year. The company's reduced-carb pasta was a
flop, with sales 50 percent lower than expected. Chief Executive Tim
Webster said the company planned to begin marketing it as a
low-calorie, high-fiber product.

No one expects low-carb products to disappear. ACNielsen LabelTrends
reported that sales of products labeled for low-carb lifestyles were
still growing but had slowed. Sales, in terms of dollars, rose only
6.1 percent for the 13 weeks ended Sept. 25, compared to the previous
quarter. That compared with a 105.5 percent increase in the 13 weeks
that ended March 27.

That decline is not surprising, even at Atkins Nutritionals Inc., a
company founded 30 years ago by Dr. Robert C. Atkins to spread the
low-carb gospel.

Colette Heimowitz, vice president of education and research, said the
market became saturated with low-carb products because companies
joined the "diet wars" in 2004. She said many companies are expected
to withdraw from the market because of the intense competition for
dieters.

Heimowitz said people have been calling the Atkins diet a fad for 30
years. "It has already stood the test of time," she said. "There is no
indication that it's going anywhere."

She predicted people will continue to incorporate it into their
lifestyle.

That's true for Champlin, the Missouri student, who said he will
continue to buy some low-carb products.

"It did teach me to watch what I eat and drink," he said. "I'm not
going to go back to how I ate before."

Others say the decline in low-carb popularity was entirely
predictable, much like past crazes such as low-fat or liquid diets.

"It was overhyped from the beginning, a craze that was never a craze,"
said Bob Goldin, executive vice president of Technomic Inc., a food
industry research firm. "It was a little bubble that had zero staying
power. We've been there, done that, many, many times."

Goldin said companies suffering because they got on the low-carb
bandwagon have only themselves to blame.

"Everyone's always looking for the silver bullet, a magic diet or a
magic pill," he said. "The whole industry needs to look at nutrition
from a holistic standpoint. A lot of things go into healthy living,
and they shouldn't look for one thing to make their fame and fortune."
 
T

TC

Guest
Of course the fad is over for those who follow it as a fad.

The rest of us who low-carb are making it a lifetime commitment to
better food and better health.

And permanent weight management without counting a single damned
calorie.

TC

[email protected] wrote:
> Experts say low-carb craze may be over
>
> By MARGARET STAFFORD, Associated Press Writer
>
> KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) - About a year ago, Dave Champlin and his

two
> roommates lived in what their friends at the University of

Missouri
> called the House of Fat. At a combined weight of 890 pounds, the

three
> decided to try the Atkins diet. By sticking to the low-carb,
> high-protein diet, Champlin lost about 45 pounds and his roommates
> each lost between 50 and 60 pounds.
>
> Despite being pleased with the results, all three were off the

diet by
> this past summer and have gained back some of the weight.

Champlin,
> 23, and his friends exemplify why many diet and food industry

experts
> are declaring the low-carb diet craze over.
>
> "It just got kind of tiresome," Champlin said. "Eating the same

thing
> over and over. It was monotonous."
>
> A study by NPD Group, an independent marketing information

company,
> found that the percentage of American adults on any low-carb diet

in
> 2004 peaked at 9.1 percent in February and dropped to 4.9 percent

by
> early November.
>
> Further, it said only one of four people surveyed was

significantly
> cutting carbs and "virtually none" were reducing carbs as much as

the
> diets recommended.
>
> That means many companies that rode the low-carb wave are either

out
> of business or refocusing their strategies.
>
> One example: MGP Ingredients Inc. of Atchison, Kan., which

profited
> from the low-carb trend, earlier this month announced it was

cutting
> its fiscal 2005 per-share earnings forecast by more than half -

from
> $1.08 to no more than 50 cents.
>
> The reason is reduced demand for its specialty proteins and

starches
> used to reduce carbohydrates in foods. MGP said low-carb demand

had
> peaked, and it did not expect it to return to anywhere near the

level
> that sparked a 123 percent increase in sales in the third quarter

of
> fiscal 2004.
>
> MGP always expected the low-carb demand to cool, but it happened

more
> quickly than anticipated, spokesman Steve Pickman said.
>
> "We expected at least to continue at its strong level for the next

18
> to 36 months," Pickman said. "We by no means feel low-carb is

dead,
> but it's declined to a much lower plateau than we or the industry
> expected."
>
> While MGP's future is not threatened, many smaller businesses

based on
> low-carb products have closed their doors, and larger companies

that
> introduced low-carb foods are changing strategies.
>
> American Italian Pasta, the nation's largest producer of dry

pasta,
> reported a net loss of $12.2 million, or 67 cents per share, in

the
> second quarter of this year. The company's reduced-carb pasta was

a
> flop, with sales 50 percent lower than expected. Chief Executive

Tim
> Webster said the company planned to begin marketing it as a
> low-calorie, high-fiber product.
>
> No one expects low-carb products to disappear. ACNielsen

LabelTrends
> reported that sales of products labeled for low-carb lifestyles

were
> still growing but had slowed. Sales, in terms of dollars, rose

only
> 6.1 percent for the 13 weeks ended Sept. 25, compared to the

previous
> quarter. That compared with a 105.5 percent increase in the 13

weeks
> that ended March 27.
>
> That decline is not surprising, even at Atkins Nutritionals Inc.,

a
> company founded 30 years ago by Dr. Robert C. Atkins to spread the
> low-carb gospel.
>
> Colette Heimowitz, vice president of education and research, said

the
> market became saturated with low-carb products because companies
> joined the "diet wars" in 2004. She said many companies are

expected
> to withdraw from the market because of the intense competition for
> dieters.
>
> Heimowitz said people have been calling the Atkins diet a fad for

30
> years. "It has already stood the test of time," she said. "There

is no
> indication that it's going anywhere."
>
> She predicted people will continue to incorporate it into their
> lifestyle.
>
> That's true for Champlin, the Missouri student, who said he will
> continue to buy some low-carb products.
>
> "It did teach me to watch what I eat and drink," he said. "I'm not
> going to go back to how I ate before."
>
> Others say the decline in low-carb popularity was entirely
> predictable, much like past crazes such as low-fat or liquid

diets.
>
> "It was overhyped from the beginning, a craze that was never a

craze,"
> said Bob Goldin, executive vice president of Technomic Inc., a

food
> industry research firm. "It was a little bubble that had zero

staying
> power. We've been there, done that, many, many times."
>
> Goldin said companies suffering because they got on the low-carb
> bandwagon have only themselves to blame.
>
> "Everyone's always looking for the silver bullet, a magic diet or

a
> magic pill," he said. "The whole industry needs to look at

nutrition
> from a holistic standpoint. A lot of things go into healthy

living,
> and they shouldn't look for one thing to make their fame and

fortune."
 
T

TC

Guest
Of course the fad is over for those who follow it as a fad.

The rest of us who low-carb are making it a lifetime commitment to
better food and better health.

And permanent weight management without counting a single damned
calorie.

TC

[email protected] wrote:
> Experts say low-carb craze may be over
>
> By MARGARET STAFFORD, Associated Press Writer
>
> KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) - About a year ago, Dave Champlin and his

two
> roommates lived in what their friends at the University of

Missouri
> called the House of Fat. At a combined weight of 890 pounds, the

three
> decided to try the Atkins diet. By sticking to the low-carb,
> high-protein diet, Champlin lost about 45 pounds and his roommates
> each lost between 50 and 60 pounds.
>
> Despite being pleased with the results, all three were off the

diet by
> this past summer and have gained back some of the weight.

Champlin,
> 23, and his friends exemplify why many diet and food industry

experts
> are declaring the low-carb diet craze over.
>
> "It just got kind of tiresome," Champlin said. "Eating the same

thing
> over and over. It was monotonous."
>
> A study by NPD Group, an independent marketing information

company,
> found that the percentage of American adults on any low-carb diet

in
> 2004 peaked at 9.1 percent in February and dropped to 4.9 percent

by
> early November.
>
> Further, it said only one of four people surveyed was

significantly
> cutting carbs and "virtually none" were reducing carbs as much as

the
> diets recommended.
>
> That means many companies that rode the low-carb wave are either

out
> of business or refocusing their strategies.
>
> One example: MGP Ingredients Inc. of Atchison, Kan., which

profited
> from the low-carb trend, earlier this month announced it was

cutting
> its fiscal 2005 per-share earnings forecast by more than half -

from
> $1.08 to no more than 50 cents.
>
> The reason is reduced demand for its specialty proteins and

starches
> used to reduce carbohydrates in foods. MGP said low-carb demand

had
> peaked, and it did not expect it to return to anywhere near the

level
> that sparked a 123 percent increase in sales in the third quarter

of
> fiscal 2004.
>
> MGP always expected the low-carb demand to cool, but it happened

more
> quickly than anticipated, spokesman Steve Pickman said.
>
> "We expected at least to continue at its strong level for the next

18
> to 36 months," Pickman said. "We by no means feel low-carb is

dead,
> but it's declined to a much lower plateau than we or the industry
> expected."
>
> While MGP's future is not threatened, many smaller businesses

based on
> low-carb products have closed their doors, and larger companies

that
> introduced low-carb foods are changing strategies.
>
> American Italian Pasta, the nation's largest producer of dry

pasta,
> reported a net loss of $12.2 million, or 67 cents per share, in

the
> second quarter of this year. The company's reduced-carb pasta was

a
> flop, with sales 50 percent lower than expected. Chief Executive

Tim
> Webster said the company planned to begin marketing it as a
> low-calorie, high-fiber product.
>
> No one expects low-carb products to disappear. ACNielsen

LabelTrends
> reported that sales of products labeled for low-carb lifestyles

were
> still growing but had slowed. Sales, in terms of dollars, rose

only
> 6.1 percent for the 13 weeks ended Sept. 25, compared to the

previous
> quarter. That compared with a 105.5 percent increase in the 13

weeks
> that ended March 27.
>
> That decline is not surprising, even at Atkins Nutritionals Inc.,

a
> company founded 30 years ago by Dr. Robert C. Atkins to spread the
> low-carb gospel.
>
> Colette Heimowitz, vice president of education and research, said

the
> market became saturated with low-carb products because companies
> joined the "diet wars" in 2004. She said many companies are

expected
> to withdraw from the market because of the intense competition for
> dieters.
>
> Heimowitz said people have been calling the Atkins diet a fad for

30
> years. "It has already stood the test of time," she said. "There

is no
> indication that it's going anywhere."
>
> She predicted people will continue to incorporate it into their
> lifestyle.
>
> That's true for Champlin, the Missouri student, who said he will
> continue to buy some low-carb products.
>
> "It did teach me to watch what I eat and drink," he said. "I'm not
> going to go back to how I ate before."
>
> Others say the decline in low-carb popularity was entirely
> predictable, much like past crazes such as low-fat or liquid

diets.
>
> "It was overhyped from the beginning, a craze that was never a

craze,"
> said Bob Goldin, executive vice president of Technomic Inc., a

food
> industry research firm. "It was a little bubble that had zero

staying
> power. We've been there, done that, many, many times."
>
> Goldin said companies suffering because they got on the low-carb
> bandwagon have only themselves to blame.
>
> "Everyone's always looking for the silver bullet, a magic diet or

a
> magic pill," he said. "The whole industry needs to look at

nutrition
> from a holistic standpoint. A lot of things go into healthy

living,
> and they shouldn't look for one thing to make their fame and

fortune."
 
J

jt

Guest
On 20 Dec 2004 11:59:54 GMT, [email protected] wrote:

>
>Experts say low-carb craze may be over
>


Cutting ot entire foods groups or even worse entire sources of energy
is not a good thing.

The only good advice of Atkins was to cut out hghly processed and
refined sugars.

Eat the healthy items of all food groups in reasonable amounts and
exercise.
 
jt wrote:

> On 20 Dec 2004 11:59:54 GMT, [email protected] wrote:


> >Experts say low-carb craze may be over


Finally! Yet, another "diet" goes into the trash heap. When are
people going to learn?

> Cutting ot entire foods groups or even worse entire sources of energy
> is not a good thing.


Amazing how people readily followed such an obvious gimmic.

The "new diet revolution" was nothing more than a rehash of good
information that's been out there for years and years, with some
high-glycemic rubbish tossed in, and a "feel good" part that allowed
you to eat tons of meat/protein. Basically it was continue to
eat your greasy cheese burgers and don't worry about eating your
vegetables. It couldn't miss... it's what everyone wanted to hear...
and people bought it hook, line, and sinker.

> The only good advice of Atkins was to cut out highly processed and
> refined sugars.


And that was never news.

Gosh, you mean eating products made of worthless pasty white flour and
chasing it down with a gallon of soda every day will make me fat...?

> Eat the healthy items of all food groups in reasonable amounts and
> exercise.


Bingo!

Patrick
 
C

Cubit

Guest
When people do their annual January diets, what is available to replace low
carb? I think there will be a resurgence of low carb for a brief period.
It is hard to imagine it being as big as last year's boom, but who knows?

Many seem to only use low carb for a temporary period, then they return to
high carbs and weight regain. When they make their new New Years
resolutions, I think they will just repeat what they did last year.


<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> Experts say low-carb craze may be over
>
> By MARGARET STAFFORD, Associated Press Writer
>
> KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) - About a year ago, Dave Champlin and his two
> roommates lived in what their friends at the University of Missouri
> called the House of Fat. At a combined weight of 890 pounds, the three
> decided to try the Atkins diet. By sticking to the low-carb,
> high-protein diet, Champlin lost about 45 pounds and his roommates
> each lost between 50 and 60 pounds.
>
> Despite being pleased with the results, all three were off the diet by
> this past summer and have gained back some of the weight. Champlin,
> 23, and his friends exemplify why many diet and food industry experts
> are declaring the low-carb diet craze over.
>
> "It just got kind of tiresome," Champlin said. "Eating the same thing
> over and over. It was monotonous."
>
> A study by NPD Group, an independent marketing information company,
> found that the percentage of American adults on any low-carb diet in
> 2004 peaked at 9.1 percent in February and dropped to 4.9 percent by
> early November.
>
> Further, it said only one of four people surveyed was significantly
> cutting carbs and "virtually none" were reducing carbs as much as the
> diets recommended.
>
> That means many companies that rode the low-carb wave are either out
> of business or refocusing their strategies.
>
> One example: MGP Ingredients Inc. of Atchison, Kan., which profited
> from the low-carb trend, earlier this month announced it was cutting
> its fiscal 2005 per-share earnings forecast by more than half - from
> $1.08 to no more than 50 cents.
>
> The reason is reduced demand for its specialty proteins and starches
> used to reduce carbohydrates in foods. MGP said low-carb demand had
> peaked, and it did not expect it to return to anywhere near the level
> that sparked a 123 percent increase in sales in the third quarter of
> fiscal 2004.
>
> MGP always expected the low-carb demand to cool, but it happened more
> quickly than anticipated, spokesman Steve Pickman said.
>
> "We expected at least to continue at its strong level for the next 18
> to 36 months," Pickman said. "We by no means feel low-carb is dead,
> but it's declined to a much lower plateau than we or the industry
> expected."
>
> While MGP's future is not threatened, many smaller businesses based on
> low-carb products have closed their doors, and larger companies that
> introduced low-carb foods are changing strategies.
>
> American Italian Pasta, the nation's largest producer of dry pasta,
> reported a net loss of $12.2 million, or 67 cents per share, in the
> second quarter of this year. The company's reduced-carb pasta was a
> flop, with sales 50 percent lower than expected. Chief Executive Tim
> Webster said the company planned to begin marketing it as a
> low-calorie, high-fiber product.
>
> No one expects low-carb products to disappear. ACNielsen LabelTrends
> reported that sales of products labeled for low-carb lifestyles were
> still growing but had slowed. Sales, in terms of dollars, rose only
> 6.1 percent for the 13 weeks ended Sept. 25, compared to the previous
> quarter. That compared with a 105.5 percent increase in the 13 weeks
> that ended March 27.
>
> That decline is not surprising, even at Atkins Nutritionals Inc., a
> company founded 30 years ago by Dr. Robert C. Atkins to spread the
> low-carb gospel.
>
> Colette Heimowitz, vice president of education and research, said the
> market became saturated with low-carb products because companies
> joined the "diet wars" in 2004. She said many companies are expected
> to withdraw from the market because of the intense competition for
> dieters.
>
> Heimowitz said people have been calling the Atkins diet a fad for 30
> years. "It has already stood the test of time," she said. "There is no
> indication that it's going anywhere."
>
> She predicted people will continue to incorporate it into their
> lifestyle.
>
> That's true for Champlin, the Missouri student, who said he will
> continue to buy some low-carb products.
>
> "It did teach me to watch what I eat and drink," he said. "I'm not
> going to go back to how I ate before."
>
> Others say the decline in low-carb popularity was entirely
> predictable, much like past crazes such as low-fat or liquid diets.
>
> "It was overhyped from the beginning, a craze that was never a craze,"
> said Bob Goldin, executive vice president of Technomic Inc., a food
> industry research firm. "It was a little bubble that had zero staying
> power. We've been there, done that, many, many times."
>
> Goldin said companies suffering because they got on the low-carb
> bandwagon have only themselves to blame.
>
> "Everyone's always looking for the silver bullet, a magic diet or a
> magic pill," he said. "The whole industry needs to look at nutrition
> from a holistic standpoint. A lot of things go into healthy living,
> and they shouldn't look for one thing to make their fame and fortune."
 
G

Gregory Toomey

Guest
[email protected] wrote:

> jt wrote:
>
>> On 20 Dec 2004 11:59:54 GMT, [email protected] wrote:

>
>> >Experts say low-carb craze may be over

>
> Finally! Yet, another "diet" goes into the trash heap. When are
> people going to learn?
>
>> Cutting ot entire foods groups or even worse entire sources of energy
>> is not a good thing.

>
> Amazing how people readily followed such an obvious gimmic.
>
> The "new diet revolution" was nothing more than a rehash of good
> information that's been out there for years and years, with some
> high-glycemic rubbish tossed in, and a "feel good" part that allowed
> you to eat tons of meat/protein. Basically it was continue to
> eat your greasy cheese burgers


No, Burger (+bun+sauce) are high in carbs.
> and don't worry about eating your
> vegetables.
>

I eat low carb and eat lots of vegetables. And I dont eat large amounts of
meat/eggs/bacon either.

gtoomey
 
D

Doug Freese

Guest
"Gregory Toomey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I eat low carb and eat lots of vegetables.


Is this oxymoronic logic? Vegetables are carbs. How do you low carb
while eating high carbs. If your trying to spit out that you don't eat
simple sugar then say it otherwise share with us your medical
marijuana.


> And I dont eat large amounts of
> meat/eggs/bacon either.


Sound like you don't realize you are closer to a vegetarian which I
understand consumes just a few carbs. ;)

-DF
 
G

Gregory Toomey

Guest
Doug Freese wrote:

>
> "Gregory Toomey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> I eat low carb and eat lots of vegetables.

>
> Is this oxymoronic logic? Vegetables are carbs. How do you low carb
> while eating high carbs. If your trying to spit out that you don't eat
> simple sugar then say it otherwise share with us your medical
> marijuana.


The point I was making is that there are high carb vegetables
(corn/peans/potatoes) and low carb (mushrooms/tomato/cucumber).
>
>> And I dont eat large amounts of
>> meat/eggs/bacon either.

>
> Sound like you don't realize you are closer to a vegetarian which I
> understand consumes just a few carbs. ;)


Err, there's plenty of other protein - seafood, soy protein, cheese, etc.


gtoomey
 
G

Gregory Toomey

Guest
Doug Freese wrote:

>
> "Gregory Toomey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> I eat low carb and eat lots of vegetables.

>
> Is this oxymoronic logic? Vegetables are carbs. How do you low carb
> while eating high carbs. If your trying to spit out that you don't eat
> simple sugar then say it otherwise share with us your medical
> marijuana.


The point I was making is that there are high carb vegetables
(corn/peans/potatoes) and low carb (mushrooms/tomato/cucumber).
>
>> And I dont eat large amounts of
>> meat/eggs/bacon either.

>
> Sound like you don't realize you are closer to a vegetarian which I
> understand consumes just a few carbs. ;)


Err, there's plenty of other protein - seafood, soy protein, cheese, etc.


gtoomey
 
M

Mirek Fídler

Guest
"Doug Freese" <[email protected]> pí¹e v diskusním pøíspìvku
news:[email protected]
>
> "Gregory Toomey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> I eat low carb and eat lots of vegetables.

>
> Is this oxymoronic logic? Vegetables are carbs. How do you low carb while
> eating high carbs. If your trying to spit out that you don't eat


Low is not equal to None.

If eating high-carb means 300g of carbs a day (as recommended by USDA), it
would require e.g. 20 pounds of brocolli to meet this amount.

If you do not know that low-carb for the most part means replacing grains
and refined sugars by veggies, you know nothing and should not involve
yourself into this kind of debate.

BTW, just to open your eyes even a little bit wider, veggies often contain
quite a lot of protein or fat too. There is e.g. almost as much protein in
spinach as there is carbs. So your claim about veggies being carbs is
completely false too. Plus a lot of fiber.

OTOH, do not be sad about your incompetence. What you believe is what food
industry wants you to believe. Download some nutritional tables and start
your education. It pays off.

Mirek
 
Gregory Toomey wrote:

> > jt wrote:


> >> On 20 Dec 2004 11:59:54 GMT, [email protected] wrote:


> >> >Experts say low-carb craze may be over


> > Finally! Yet, another "diet" goes into the trash heap. When are
> > people going to learn?


> >> Cutting ot entire foods groups or even worse entire sources of

energy
> >> is not a good thing.


> > Amazing how people readily followed such an obvious gimmic.


> > The "new diet revolution" was nothing more than a rehash of good
> > information that's been out there for years and years, with some
> > high-glycemic rubbish tossed in, and a "feel good" part that

allowed
> > you to eat tons of meat/protein. Basically it was continue

to
> > eat your greasy cheese burgers


> No, Burger (+bun+sauce) are high in carbs.


The bun is made of worthless pasty white flour, so you replace it with
a whole wheat bun. The sauce I take it you're refering to is the
ketchup and mustard. Mostly worthless corn syrup, but if you just dab
it on the total calories are minimal. Now the greasy burger is ground
up remains of an unknown number of different cows and is chock full of
saturated fat and has more calories than the bun and the sauce
combined. I say throw that away too... it's ****.

> > and don't worry about eating your
> > vegetables.


> I eat low carb and eat lots of vegetables. And I don't eat large

amounts of
> meat/eggs/bacon either.


That's good to hear. However, the "high-carb" vegtables are not what's
making America fat. You won't find the obese choking down tons of raw
carrots, baked potatoes and fresh corn. Why? Because you actually
have to chew these vegetables, plus they're either filling and/or low
calorie. So the only carbs you need to cut out are products made of
the highly processed white flour and corn syrup.

Patrick
 
N

NoOption5L[email protected]

Guest
Mirek Fídler wrote:

> OTOH, do not be sad about your incompetence. What you believe is what

food
> industry wants you to believe.


Mark,

What the food industry wants us to believe is that meat from
steroid-injected, heavily antibiotic-doped cows, nasty worthless soda
pop, funky artificial sweetners, flour stripped of nearly all of its
nutritional value, experiment-gone -wrong partially hydrogenated oils
are good for us.

> Download some nutritional tables and start your education. It pays

off.

Yes, it does. And so does eating real food.

Patrick
 
It's not over. the only thing that's over is people buying prepared low
carb foods since most of them are not really low carb. The consumer is
wise to their tricks. all you need to do to be low carb is buy real
food and cook it. you don't need any gimick which is what most diet
plans are.
 
H

Hugh

Guest
>
>Experts say low-carb craze may be over

(the "experts" seemingly a couple of market research agencies).

There are plenty of people in agriculture and the food industry who
have suffered financially because of the popularity of low-carb diets.
This article is doubtless just another part of their propaganda war to
try and recover lost market share.

> decided to try the Atkins diet. By sticking to the low-carb,
> high-protein diet, Champlin lost about 45 pounds and his roommates


This endlessly repeated myth about Atkins being a "high protein" diet.
Read the book. The whole rationale behind his diet is that you eat fat
instead of carbohydrates, thus forcing your body to switch from
carbohydrate burning to a fat burning metabolism. Eating too much
protein would prevent that from happening, since your body converts
excess protein into sugar. If anything, Atkins is a high fat diet, not
high protein.
 
M

Mirek Fídler

Guest
<[email protected]> píse v diskusním príspevku
news:[email protected]

> calorie. So the only carbs you need to cut out are products made of
> the highly processed white flour and corn syrup.


In fact, I believe that just cutting out those would prevent weight gain in
most of people.

Mirek
 
"> calorie. So the only carbs you need to cut out are products made of
> the highly processed white flour and corn syrup.


In fact, I believe that just cutting out those would prevent weight gain
in most of people."

A news article a little back noted that one soft drink a day increase in
intake had a good correlation to the recent increases of weight because
the calories in one can was about the right amount to account for the
increase when projected over the same number of years.
 
"(the "experts" seemingly a couple of market research agencies).

There are plenty of people in agriculture and the food industry who
have suffered financially because of the popularity of low-carb diets.
This article is doubtless just another part of their propaganda war to
try and recover lost market share."

For each pound of meat around 10 pounds of grain are required, the farmers
would be overjoyed if people ate more meat, they would gro more grain and
raise more animals to boot.

"This endlessly repeated myth about Atkins being a "high protein" diet.
Read the book. The whole rationale behind his diet is that you eat fat
instead of carbohydrates, thus forcing your body to switch from
carbohydrate burning to a fat burning metabolism. Eating too much
protein would prevent that from happening, since your body converts
excess protein into sugar. If anything, Atkins is a high fat diet, not
high protein."

People didn't read the book, they heard through the grapevine that someone
can eat all the meat and eggs and cheese etc. as they want and loose
weight. An excessive of any of the macro groups gets turned into sugar,
and then into fat which is the storage form of excessive calories. Short
of eating lard the way people increase fat is to increase protein also,
unless they choose to substitute veggie sources of fats. Not to worry,
diet fads have a cycle and this one will have some time in the sun again,
this one having been around now for more then 100 years.
 
"It's not over. the only thing that's over is people buying prepared low
carb foods since most of them are not really low carb. The consumer is
wise to their tricks. all you need to do to be low carb is buy real
food and cook it. you don't need any gimick which is what most diet"

As the article noted, people using the diet had decreased about half
within
the year.
 
H

Hagrinas Mivali

Guest
Doug Freese wrote:
> "Gregory Toomey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> I eat low carb and eat lots of vegetables.

>
> Is this oxymoronic logic? Vegetables are carbs. How do you low carb
> while eating high carbs. If your trying to spit out that you don't eat
> simple sugar then say it otherwise share with us your medical
> marijuana.
>


Of course vegetables are carbs. "Low carb" does not mean "low in
carbohydrates." It means "a diet I don't like" to some people, and "a diet
I do like" to others. There are plenty of people here who will blast "low
carb" diets such as South Beach, which advocate eating most vegetables in
abundance and claim NOT to be low carb, because they are "low carb." There
are others who will look at diets that specifically limit carbs or have
users count carbs, and call those "low carb" diets.

I suppose the latter point makes sense, but diets such as Atkins do allow
certain carbs, even though they are "low carb." If a dieter can eat lots of
vegetables and still stay below his threshold, then it's easy to say that
he's on a low carb diet AND eats plenty of vegetables.

If a diet has no carb counting and allows "unlimited" carb consumption (in
the sense that a user never reaches a maximum carb consumption, after which
he can have no more,) some will call it "low carb" if it disallows certain
types of foods, which happen to be carbs, or if it has an induction period,
during which some carbs are temporarily limited.

I suppose I could call Weight Watchers a low carb diet since it won't allow
me to eat a cheese pizza, which has a high carb crust, or a Hardee's 1/2 lb
burger with its 60 carbs, etc.

The reality is that most diets limit or disallow some foods that are high in
carbs, and allow other foods that are carbs (and may even be high in carbs.)
It's far more important to look at what people actually eat, and I think the
idea of calling any diet a "low carb" diet, unless it specifically limits
daily intake of carbs to a certain low level, makes little sense.

The problem with Atkins is not that it limits carbs. It's quite possible to
stick to Atkins by the letter and have a healthful diet. The problem is
that it's also possible to be "on Atkins" and eat a terrible diet, avoid
vegetables, stick to lots of fatty meats, etc. I don't know if that's what
Atkins specifically recommends. But that's been the perception for decades.
If it's true, it's a legitimate concern, even if you don't have to tailor
your diet that way.