eyeglasses and bicycling

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by collver1, Mar 3, 2004.

  1. collver1

    collver1 Guest

    ``Eyeglass wearers are somewhat protected by their prescription lenses (you
    ARE wearing plastic, NOT glass lenses aren't you?) so one would imagine
    this danger would pertain more to helmet mounted mirrors, if it exists at
    all.'' -- http://users.rcn.com/icebike/Equipment/cyclingmirrors.htm

    This is the first I heard of it. Is it advisable for safety reasons to wear plastic corrective
    lenses instead of glass while bike riding?

    Thanks,

    Ben
    --
    Never wear your best pants when you go to fight for freedom.
     
    Tags:


  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    [email protected] wrote in news:Bsu[email protected]_s01:
    > This is the first I heard of it. Is it advisable for safety reasons to wear plastic corrective
    > lenses instead of glass while bike riding?

    If you crash on your face, there is a chance that glass lenses will shatter into your eyes. Is it a
    big chance? You can decide for yourself.
     
  3. Frkrygow

    Frkrygow Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > ``Eyeglass wearers are somewhat protected by their prescription lenses (you ARE wearing plastic,
    > NOT glass lenses aren't you?) so one would imagine this danger would pertain more to helmet
    > mounted mirrors, if it exists at all.'' --
    > http://users.rcn.com/icebike/Equipment/cyclingmirrors.htm
    >
    > This is the first I heard of it. Is it advisable for safety reasons to wear plastic corrective
    > lenses instead of glass while bike riding?

    Well, see if you can find any figures on the number of people injured while biking because their
    eyeglass lenses broke.

    One thing is certain: no matter _what_ device or activity you name, there is someone out there who
    will warn you that it's dangerous. If you listen to all of them, you'll end up spending all day in
    bed, cowering with fear.

    Of course, the CPSC claims there are 400,000 ER visits annually caused by beds & bedclothes, so even
    that won't work!

    Oh, it's a dangerous world, all right! ;-)

    --
    Frank Krygowski [To reply, omit what's between "at" and "cc"]

    ------------ And now a word from our sponsor ------------------ For a quality usenet news server,
    try DNEWS, easy to install, fast, efficient and reliable. For home servers or carrier class
    installations with millions of users it will allow you to grow! ---- See
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  4. Pete

    Pete Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s01...
    > ``Eyeglass wearers are somewhat protected by their prescription lenses
    (you
    > ARE wearing plastic, NOT glass lenses aren't you?) so one would imagine this danger would pertain
    > more to helmet mounted mirrors, if it exists at all.'' --
    > http://users.rcn.com/icebike/Equipment/cyclingmirrors.htm
    >
    > This is the first I heard of it. Is it advisable for safety reasons to wear plastic corrective
    > lenses instead of glass while bike riding?
    >

    1. Falls: If, as you fall, the glasses are still close enough to your face to affect the eyeball if
    they shatter...you're already in trouble. Not only are the glasses shattering, but your face is
    scraping along the ground.

    2. Impacts (rocks, etc): This can happen anywhere, not just on a bike. If it worries you, get the
    high impact polycarbonate lenses.

    40 yrs of wearing glasses, and the only time glass ones broke was when a lens popped out, hit the
    sidewalk and shattered.

    Today, I use the polycarbs, primarily because of the weight difference.

    Pete
     
  5. collver1

    collver1 Guest

    Situation #2 didn't occur to me. I originally went with glass lenses so they would last longer
    without getting scratched.

    One problem is that they can fog up fast, giving me instant temporary blindness until I slide them
    down my nose. That tends to happen only at a temperature change, such as going between indoors and
    outdoors, or losing wind chill by stopping at a stop light.

    Ben
    --
    Never wear your best pants when you go to fight for freedom.
     
  6. B A R R Y

    B A R R Y Guest

    On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 22:13:49 -0500, "David L. Johnson"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> This is the first I heard of it. Is it advisable for safety reasons to wear plastic corrective
    >> lenses instead of glass while bike riding?
    >
    >Yes, but, is this really an issue? Who still has glass lenses?

    I do. In fact they're genuine prescription safety glasses. I asked for real glass, just last year,
    because I'm tired of scratched, solvent damaged, and pitted polycarbonate lenses.

    Although I usually bicycle in contacts, I'd not hesitate to wear my glass safety glasses while
    riding. All glass lenses are not created equal.

    Barry
     
  7. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]_s01>, [email protected] says...
    > ``Eyeglass wearers are somewhat protected by their prescription lenses (you ARE wearing plastic,
    > NOT glass lenses aren't you?) so one would imagine this danger would pertain more to helmet
    > mounted mirrors, if it exists at all.'' --
    > http://users.rcn.com/icebike/Equipment/cyclingmirrors.htm
    >
    > This is the first I heard of it. Is it advisable for safety reasons to wear plastic corrective
    > lenses instead of glass while bike riding?

    No more so (and maybe less so) than when driving. The argument about the shatter-ability of glass vs
    plastic has been going a long time, and is meaningless for the vast majority of people who don't
    work in a machine shop or at a construction site.

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the newsgroups if possible).
     
  8. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,=20 [email protected] says...
    > On Thu, 04 Mar 2004 00:09:06 +0000, collver1 wrote:
    >=20
    > > ``Eyeglass wearers are somewhat protected by their prescription lenses =
    (you
    > > ARE wearing plastic, NOT glass lenses aren't you?) so one would imagine this danger would
    > > pertain more to helmet mounted mirrors, if it exists =
    at
    > > all.'' -- http://users.rcn.com/icebike/Equipment/cyclingmirrors.htm
    > >=20
    > > This is the first I heard of it. Is it advisable for safety reasons to wear plastic corrective
    > > lenses instead of glass while bike riding?
    >=20
    > Yes, but, is this really an issue? Who still has glass lenses?=20 I=A0haven't had them since the
    > late '70s, and even then I was swimming against the tide. They were "photogrey" lenses,
    > photochromatic, and at the time were only available in glass. But even that rationale is gone now,
    > as photochromatic lenses are now available in plastic. I'd be amaze=
    d
    > if 5% of lenses being used now were glass.

    The main advantage of glass, and one of the reasons I still use it, is=20 that if you need a strong
    prescription (6.5, in my case), most plastic=20 lenses can only give you good focus over a
    relatively narrow area of the=20 lens. My glass lenses give perfectly clear vision over the entire
    field=20 of view. If you don't need a strong prescription, I don't think this is=20 an issue.

    --=20 Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the=20 newsgroups if possible).
     
  9. On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 22:35:09 -0500, "frkrygow"
    <"frkrygow"@omitcc.ysu.edu> wrote:

    >Well, see if you can find any figures on the number of people injured while biking because their
    >eyeglass lenses broke.

    My last crash involved my glasses and the plastic lenses did not shatter (so I can now say that
    plastic lenses saved my life, or is it just my eyes?). OTOH, I now have a pretty nice scar from the
    eye glass frames, the bottoms. So I guess you have to go with those frames with the little plastic
    guidewires that slip off the lenses and leave you fumbling blind at the damnedest times.

    Curtis L. Russell Odenton, MD (USA) Just someone on two wheels...
     
  10. Frkrygow

    Frkrygow Guest

    David L. Johnson wrote:

    > Who still has glass lenses? I haven't had them since the late '70s, and even then I was swimming
    > against the tide.

    Obviously, you're not enough of a retro-grouch.

    I still use glass lenses, for the scratch resistance. My prescription seems to change only very,
    very slowly, so I want the lenses to remain scratch-free a long, long time. The idea of having to
    carry and use special tissues - or at least avoid Kleenex, etc - to clean them (as the optician
    recommended) kept me away from plastic.

    --
    Frank Krygowski [To reply, omit what's between "at" and "cc"]
     
  11. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "frkrygow" <"frkrygow"@omitcc.ysu.edu> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > One thing is certain: no matter _what_ device or activity you name, there is someone out there who
    > will warn you that it's dangerous. If you listen to all of them, you'll end up spending all day in
    > bed, cowering with fear.
    >
    Well, if you decide to lose weight while cowering in fear, this week's "The Onion" has the
    diet for you:

    http://www.theonion.com/news/index.php?i=1&n=2

    "a new English translation of Germany's most popular diet book takes the concept to a new
    philosophical level. The Nietzschean diet, which commands its adherents to eat superhuman amounts of
    whatever they most fear..."
     
  12. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "frkrygow" <"frkrygow"@omitcc.ysu.edu> wrote

    >
    > Obviously, you're not enough of a retro-grouch.
    >
    > I still use glass lenses, for the scratch resistance. My prescription seems to change only very,
    > very slowly, so I want the lenses to remain scratch-free a long, long time. The idea of having to
    > carry and use special tissues - or at least avoid Kleenex, etc - to clean them (as the optician
    > recommended) kept me away from plastic.

    My current ones (4 yr old scratch resistant hi impact plastic) have been cleaned with everything
    from a sterile wipe, Kleenex, a tshirt, up to and including wiping with a muddy Nomex glove. A
    couple of very shallow, tiny scratches as I sit here and inspect closely.

    I'm sure if I put it under a microscope I'd be shocked, but they don't seem any worse than previous
    glass lenses.

    There is a definite weight diff between glass and plastic.

    Pete
     
  13. Peter

    Peter Guest

    Pete wrote:

    > "frkrygow" <"frkrygow"@omitcc.ysu.edu> wrote
    >>Obviously, you're not enough of a retro-grouch.
    >>
    >>I still use glass lenses, for the scratch resistance. My prescription seems to change only very,
    >>very slowly, so I want the lenses to remain scratch-free a long, long time. The idea of having to
    >>carry and use special tissues - or at least avoid Kleenex, etc - to clean them (as the optician
    >>recommended) kept me away from plastic.
    >
    > My current ones (4 yr old scratch resistant hi impact plastic) have been cleaned with everything
    > from a sterile wipe, Kleenex, a tshirt, up to and including wiping with a muddy Nomex glove. A
    > couple of very shallow, tiny scratches as I sit here and inspect closely.
    >
    > I'm sure if I put it under a microscope I'd be shocked, but they don't seem any worse than
    > previous glass lenses.

    I have no need for a microscope to identify quite a few scratches in my glass lenses. From past
    experience plastic ones (despite the 'scratch-resistant' label) would have fared far worse.
    >
    > There is a definite weight diff between glass and plastic.
    >
    Should I get one of the titanium chains to make up for the extra weight of my glass lenses?
     
  14. In article <[email protected]_s03>,
    Peter <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Pete wrote:
    >
    > > "frkrygow" <"frkrygow"@omitcc.ysu.edu> wrote
    > >>Obviously, you're not enough of a retro-grouch.
    > >>
    > >>I still use glass lenses, for the scratch resistance. My prescription seems to change only very,
    > >>very slowly, so I want the lenses to remain scratch-free a long, long time. The idea of having
    > >>to carry and use special tissues - or at least avoid Kleenex, etc - to clean them (as the
    > >>optician recommended) kept me away from plastic.

    > > There is a definite weight diff between glass and plastic.
    > >
    > Should I get one of the titanium chains to make up for the extra weight of my glass lenses?

    Your bike chain doesn't rest on the bridge of your nose all day. For fairly blind people like me (~4
    diopters in the bad eye), high-IR glass is a cosmetic and comfort godsend.

    That said, for sports and rides I always use my contacts.

    Even lighter than glasses,
    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine/wiredcola/ President, Fabrizio
    Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  15. McBain_v1

    McBain_v1 New Member

    Joined:
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    My dad used to wear glass lenses when cycling but he had a spill and sure enough they shattered when he fell. The end results was serious cuts to the orbit around his eye. The A&E people said that was incredibly lucky considering the shards that they were pulling out of his face. He's got some impressive scarring now I can tell you.

    Being a speccy wearer myself (for over 10 years now) I cycle with plastic lenses. I am going to get some titanium frames because they feel nice and light. The biggest disadvantages I find are:

    1. rain - no specs come with wipers
    2. fogging up - mainly happens at traffic lights when I stop
    3. sun glasses or not - I guess reactolite lenses would solve this
    4. looking over the top - this happens whenever I'm trying to get tucked down

    Do people like Oakley actually fit prescription lenses into their frames? I've yet to see it if they do.
     
  16. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, usenet- [email protected] says...
    > collver1 wrote:
    > > ``Eyeglass wearers are somewhat protected by their prescription lenses (you ARE wearing
    > > plastic, NOT glass lenses aren't you?) so one would imagine this danger would pertain more to
    > > helmet mounted mirrors, if it exists at all.'' This is the first I heard of it. Is it
    > > advisable for safety reasons to wear plastic corrective lenses instead of glass while bike
    > > riding?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > My dad used to wear glass lenses when cycling but he had a spill and sure enough they shattered
    > when he fell. The end results was serious cuts to the orbit around his eye. The A&E people said
    > that was incredibly lucky considering the shards that they were pulling out of his face. He's got
    > some impressive scarring now I can tell you.
    >
    > Being a speccy wearer myself (for over 10 years now) I cycle with plastic lenses. I am going to
    > get some titanium frames because they feel nice and light. The biggest disadvantages I find are:
    >
    > 1. rain - no specs come with wipers
    > 2. fogging up - mainly happens at traffic lights when I stop
    > 3. sun glasses or not - I guess reactolite lenses would solve this
    > 4. looking over the top - this happens whenever I'm trying to get tucked down
    >
    > Do people like Oakley actually fit prescription lenses into their frames? I've yet to see it if
    > they do.

    I know Uvex does, and I imagine others do as well. Not in all their frames, but several models.

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the newsgroups if possible).
     
  17. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    McBain_v1 wrote:

    > Do people like Oakley actually fit prescription lenses into their frames? I've yet to see it if
    > they do.

    Rudy Project does fit prescription lenses in several of their designs:

    http://www.rudyprojectusa.com/products/sunglasses/rxinsert.htm

    These designs fit the prescription directly into the frame:

    http://www.rudyprojectusa.com/products/sunglasses/rxinframe.htm

    That sounds like a nice idea, since having two lenses is a guarantee of fogging. I'm still using my
    Briko Zens with inserts, but Fabrizio tells me I'm out of style.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  18. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    Ryan Cousineau wrote:

    > Your bike chain doesn't rest on the bridge of your nose all day. For fairly blind people like me
    > (~4 diopters in the bad eye), high-IR glass is a cosmetic and comfort godsend.

    Um, don't you mean high-IR poylcarbonate lenses? That's what I have (-4 diopters). They're feather
    light and very thin, thinner than any glass lenses I've had.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  19. On Fri, 05 Mar 2004 07:03:55 -0800, Terry Morse <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >McBain_v1 wrote:
    >
    >> Do people like Oakley actually fit prescription lenses into their frames? I've yet to see it if
    >> they do.
    >
    >Rudy Project does fit prescription lenses in several of their designs:
    >
    >http://www.rudyprojectusa.com/products/sunglasses/rxinsert.htm
    >
    >These designs fit the prescription directly into the frame:
    >
    >http://www.rudyprojectusa.com/products/sunglasses/rxinframe.htm
    >
    >That sounds like a nice idea, since having two lenses is a guarantee of fogging. I'm still using my
    >Briko Zens with inserts, but Fabrizio tells me I'm out of style.

    Sunglasses of the sporting variety are invariably designed for people who can already see. The more
    impaired segment of the population has to do without.

    I'm at -4.5 and -5 diopters, and so polycarbonate lenses are the only real option for me (I would
    otherwise be compelled to wear unmanageably big & thick glasses). I have polarized sunglasses made
    to that prescription which work very well, but I wonder what I'm missing in terms of not fogging.

    From as far as I can tell, everything's all right so long as you're under -3 diopter. Once you're
    worse than that, specialized 'cycling' glasses are totally out of the question.

    -Luigi
     
  20. On Fri, 05 Mar 2004 02:38:32 GMT, "Pete" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >There is a definite weight diff between glass and plastic.
    >
    >Pete

    That's a problem for me, too. My nose has been broken at least six times, and glass eyeglasses won't
    stay in place - no matter how much I or the optometrist's assistant tweeks the support system.

    Picking up ultra thin scratch resistant veri-lense plastic lensed eyeglasses on Saturday. Also has
    the geeky plastic that covers the entire upper loop of the nose piece - see if that will keep the
    eyeglasses up...

    Curtis L. Russell Odenton, MD (USA) Just someone on two wheels...
     
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