Fabrizio Mazzoleni and the Tour de Reve

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Kevan Smith, Jun 21, 2003.

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  1. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    Here's an interesting story I picked up from one of the other team's riders:

    When the Tour de Reve got to the climbs, it became apparent Fabrizio was having a bad day. He
    grimaced, turned green and quickly fell to the back on the first
    climb. The team doctor came up to him and gave him some energy, but it didn't kick in right away. On
    the second climb, Fabrizio fell way behind the pack and looked to be out of the race. But
    then, on the third climb, the doctor's ministrations kicked in and he worked his way back up
    through the pack and took the stage!

    Yes, Fabrizio suffered, died and was buried by the pack, but on the third stage he rose again in
    fulfillment of his prescription.

    Thank you! I'm here all week!
    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace a suddenly squashing radio comes an
    ancient pigeon?!?
    6:35:43 PM 21 June 2003
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, Kevan Smith
    <[email protected]/\/\> wrote:

    > Here's an interesting story I picked up from one of the other team's riders:
    >
    > When the Tour de Reve got to the climbs, it became apparent Fabrizio was having a bad day. He
    > grimaced, turned green and quickly fell to the back on the first
    > climb. The team doctor came up to him and gave him some energy, but it didn't kick in right away.
    > On the second climb, Fabrizio fell way behind the pack and looked to be out of the race.
    > But then, on the third climb, the doctor's ministrations kicked in and he worked his way
    > back up through the pack and took the stage!
    >
    > Yes, Fabrizio suffered, died and was buried by the pack, but on the third stage he rose again in
    > fulfillment of his prescription.
    >
    > Thank you! I'm here all week!

    Fabrizio is a lot of things, but he isn't God. I already have one of those, and He is jealous. I
    think Fabrizio would just be a high-maintenance god.

    But maybe if he did a few good deeds in the peloton someday he could become St. Fabrizio, patron
    saint of stage racers.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  3. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Mon, 23 Jun 2003 21:20:51 -0700, Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> from WAC Bennett Review of Arts
    and Literature wrote:

    >But maybe if he did a few good deeds in the peloton someday he could become St. Fabrizio, patron
    >saint of stage racers.

    I thought there already was one -- Saint Liborius comes to mind. Also, Saints Cosmas and Damian.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace Yow! Am I in Milwaukee?
    12:41:34 AM 24 June 2003
     
  4. "Kevan Smith" <[email protected]/\/\> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 23 Jun 2003 21:20:51 -0700, Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> from
    WAC
    > Bennett Review of Arts and Literature wrote:
    >
    > >But maybe if he did a few good deeds in the peloton someday he could become St. Fabrizio, patron
    > >saint of stage racers.
    >
    > I thought there already was one -- Saint Liborius comes to mind. Also,
    Saints
    > Cosmas and Damian.

    Wow. Cosimus and Damian? They're martyrs--what do they have to do with stage racers?

    -Luigi looking for a medal of Madonna del Ghisallo....
     
  5. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 09:19:53 -0400, "Luigi de Guzman" <[email protected]> from Cox
    Communications wrote:

    >
    >"Kevan Smith" <[email protected]/\/\> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> On Mon, 23 Jun 2003 21:20:51 -0700, Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> from
    >WAC
    >> Bennett Review of Arts and Literature wrote:
    >>
    >> >But maybe if he did a few good deeds in the peloton someday he could become St. Fabrizio, patron
    >> >saint of stage racers.
    >>
    >> I thought there already was one -- Saint Liborius comes to mind. Also,
    >Saints
    >> Cosmas and Damian.
    >
    >Wow. Cosimus and Damian? They're martyrs--what do they have to do with stage racers?

    Patron saints of pharmacists.

    Saint Liborius is the patron of European urology.

    I wish I could make this stuff up.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace Are you mentally here at Pizza Hut??
    1:21:42 PM 24 June 2003
     
  6. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 13:22:20 -0500, Kevan Smith <[email protected]/\/\> wrote:

    >Saint Liborius is the patron of European urology.

    Now that is - er - wierd. What did poor old Liborius do to deserve that? On second thoughts, since
    St George was German and never set foot in England maybe it's completely random.

    How does one acquire a patron saint, I wonder? Apply to the Vatican? Are they sold, like
    indulgences, or is there a panel of judges?

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com Advance
    notice: ADSL service in process of transfer to a new ISP. Obviously there will be a week of downtime
    between the engineer removing the BT service and the same engineer connecting the same equipment on
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  7. "Luigi de Guzman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > looking for a medal of Madonna del Ghisallo....

    If you are looking for a saint's medal for bicyclists, go here:

    http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/stc05comsy.htm

    It's a Saint Christopher's medal, just with a cyclist on the reverse. I don't know enough about why
    Christopher would be pictured -- is he a saint of transportation in general?

    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky ([email protected]) Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm Singing with you at: http://www.tiferet.net/ Books
    just wanna be FREE! See what I mean at: http://bookcrossing.com/friend/Cpetersky
     
  8. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Just zis Guy, you know?"
    <[email protected]> writes:
    > On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 13:22:20 -0500, Kevan Smith <[email protected]/\/\> wrote:
    >
    >>Saint Liborius is the patron of European urology.
    >
    > Now that is - er - wierd. What did poor old Liborius do to deserve that?

    I think Kevan was referring to drug testing (of competitors).

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  9. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 20:25:47 +0100, "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> from
    Disorganised wrote:

    >On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 13:22:20 -0500, Kevan Smith <[email protected]/\/\> wrote:
    >
    >>Saint Liborius is the patron of European urology.
    >
    >Now that is - er - wierd. What did poor old Liborius do to deserve that? On second thoughts, since
    >St George was German and never set foot in England maybe it's completely random.

    "Liborius of Le Mans B (RM) Died 390. Liborius, the second or third bishop of Le Mans (348 to 390),
    is the patron of Paderborn, to which his relics were translated in 836 (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
    In art, Saint Liborius is depicted as a bishop with a peacock. He may be carrying small stones on a
    book (Roeder). Liborius is invoked against colic, fever, and gallstones (Roeder)."

    Apparently, it's the stones. /me shrugs.

    >How does one acquire a patron saint, I wonder? Apply to the Vatican? Are they sold, like
    >indulgences, or is there a panel of judges?

    Many of the older saints were beatified based on local tradition or authority. Today, beatification
    is a completely different matter altogether.

    If you are really interested: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02364b.htm

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace Is this the line for the latest whimsical
    YUGOSLAVIAN drama which also makes you want to CRY and reconsider the VIETNAM WAR?
    3:17:44 PM 24 June 2003
     
  10. "Kevan Smith" <[email protected]/\/\> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 09:19:53 -0400, "Luigi de Guzman" <[email protected]>
    from
    > Cox Communications wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Kevan Smith" <[email protected]/\/\> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]...
    > >> On Mon, 23 Jun 2003 21:20:51 -0700, Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]>
    from
    > >WAC
    > >> Bennett Review of Arts and Literature wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >But maybe if he did a few good deeds in the peloton someday he could become St. Fabrizio,
    > >> >patron saint of stage racers.
    > >>
    > >> I thought there already was one -- Saint Liborius comes to mind. Also,
    > >Saints
    > >> Cosmas and Damian.
    > >
    > >Wow. Cosimus and Damian? They're martyrs--what do they have to do with stage racers?
    >
    > Patron saints of pharmacists.

    That makes sense, now.

    -L
     
  11. "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 13:22:20 -0500, Kevan Smith <[email protected]/\/\> wrote:
    >
    > >Saint Liborius is the patron of European urology.
    >
    > Now that is - er - wierd. What did poor old Liborius do to deserve that? On second thoughts, since
    > St George was German and never set foot in England maybe it's completely random.

    The patron saint of England used to be St. Edward the Confessor--thus, the arms for England were
    Edward's three martlets on an azure field--until the time of the Crusades, when it was thought that
    St. George, with his dragon-slaying credentials, would be better for recruiting englishmen to the
    crusading effort than chaste, pious old Edward.

    -Luigi
     
  12. On Mon, 23 Jun 2003 21:20:51 -0700, Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >But maybe if he did a few good deeds in the peloton someday he could become St. Fabrizio, patron
    >saint of stage racers.

    St. Fabrizio is already the patron saint of fabric deodorizers, if memory serves.
     
  13. Hunrobe <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Christopher is the patron saint of travelers. Does that make him the patron saint of NBA power
    > forwards as well?

    Good idea, but that is actually St. Stephen, the patron saint of bricklayers.

    Luigi de Guzman wrote:

    > Wow. Cosimus and Damian? They're martyrs--what do they have to do with stage racers?

    That makes perfect sense to me. Read the online diary of someone doing a three-week stage race for
    the first time.
     
  14. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On 24 Jun 2003 13:02:27 -0700, [email protected] (Claire Petersky) from
    http://groups.google.com/ wrote:

    >"Luigi de Guzman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >> looking for a medal of Madonna del Ghisallo....
    >
    >If you are looking for a saint's medal for bicyclists, go here:
    >
    >http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/stc05comsy.htm
    >
    >It's a Saint Christopher's medal, just with a cyclist on the reverse. I don't know enough about why
    >Christopher would be pictured -- is he a saint of transportation in general?

    "His fame derives from the pious legend of him being a "Christ-bearer" (= Christopher). He was a
    powerfully built man who wandered the world in search of novelty and adventure. He came upon a
    hermit who lived beside a dangerous stream and served others by guiding them to safe places to
    cross. He gave Offero instruction in the truth of God. Offero took the hermit's place, but instead
    of guiding travellers, he carried them safely across the stream.

    "One day he carried a small child across the stream; the child's weight nearly crushed him. When
    they arrived on the other side, the child revealed himself as Christ, and he was so heavy because he
    bore the weight of the world on himself. He then baptised Offero with water from the stream.
    Christopher's service at the stream led to his patronage of things related to travel and travellers,
    people who carry things, etc."

    http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/saintc05.htm

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace Alex's car slams the red and nightmare shoes
    4:06:44 PM 24 June 2003
     
  15. Kevan Smith <[email protected]/\/\> wrote:

    > "His fame derives from the pious legend of him being a "Christ-bearer" (= Christopher). He was a
    > powerfully built man who wandered the world in search of novelty and adventure. He came upon a
    > hermit who lived beside a dangerous stream and served others by guiding them to safe places to
    > cross. He gave Offero instruction in the truth of God. Offero took the hermit's place, but instead
    > of guiding travellers, he carried them safely across the stream.

    Unfortunately putting the hermit out of a job[*], an early demonstration of the unforeseen
    consequences of globalization and cheap labor.

    [*] Yes, I know being a hermit is a vocation, not a job as such.
     
  16. "Benjamin Weiner" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]... \
    > Unfortunately putting the hermit out of a job[*], an early demonstration of the unforeseen
    > consequences of globalization and cheap labor.
    >
    >
    > [*] Yes, I know being a hermit is a vocation, not a job as such.

    A very tightly-regulated one at that! If I remember right, to be a fully-accredited hermit you had
    to have been given a special dispensation by the local bishop....

    -Luigi
     
  17. In article <[email protected]>, Kevan Smith
    <[email protected]/\/\> wrote:

    > On 24 Jun 2003 13:02:27 -0700, [email protected] (Claire Petersky) from
    > http://groups.google.com/ wrote:
    >
    > >"Luigi de Guzman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > >
    > >> looking for a medal of Madonna del Ghisallo....
    > >
    > >If you are looking for a saint's medal for bicyclists, go here:
    > >
    > >http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/stc05comsy.htm
    > >
    > >It's a Saint Christopher's medal, just with a cyclist on the reverse. I don't know enough about
    > >why Christopher would be pictured -- is he a saint of transportation in general?

    Yes.

    > "His fame derives from the pious legend of him being a "Christ-bearer" (= Christopher). He was a
    > powerfully built man who wandered the world in search

    > http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/saintc05.htm

    The problem is that St. Christopher has been revised away:

    http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=36

    There does appear to have been a martyr St. Christopher, but little more is known. This led me to
    point at a friend's St. Christopher's medal and say, "you know, that doesn't work anymore."

    Madonna del Ghisallo was made the patroness of cyclists because they often stopped to pray at her
    shrine, which (surprise!) was at the top of a steep hill :).

    Mortification and suffering: good for the soul, good for training.

    Because Our Lady has the cyclists covered, I proposed er, Saint Fabrizio as a special patron of
    stage racers, since he doesn't want to have much to do with ordinary cyclists, commuters, and riff
    raff like that.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  18. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Wed, 25 Jun 2003 07:18:18 -0700, Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> from WAC Bennett Review of Arts
    and Literature wrote:

    >The problem is that St. Christopher has been revised away:

    You try telling that to the creole catholics here. Me, I'm not so brave. I still have relatives who
    put out St. Joseph statues when they want rain.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace I just forgot my Social Security number.
    2:54:04 PM 25 June 2003
     
  19. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 16:55:17 -0400, "Luigi de Guzman" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The patron saint of England used to be St. Edward the Confessor--thus, the arms for England were
    >Edward's three martlets on an azure field--until the time of the Crusades, when it was thought that
    >St. George, with his dragon-slaying credentials, would be better for recruiting englishmen to the
    >crusading effort than chaste, pious old Edward.

    I think we should ditch German George in favour of a Proper British Saint - I suggest Alban. But
    then, I grew up in St Albans...

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com Advance
    notice: ADSL service in process of transfer to a new ISP. Obviously there will be a week of downtime
    between the engineer removing the BT service and the same engineer connecting the same equipment on
    the same line in the same exchange and billing it to the new ISP.
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>, Kevan Smith
    <[email protected]/\/\> wrote:

    > On Wed, 25 Jun 2003 07:18:18 -0700, Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> from WAC Bennett Review of
    > Arts and Literature wrote:
    >
    > >The problem is that St. Christopher has been revised away:
    >
    > You try telling that to the creole catholics here. Me, I'm not so brave. I still have relatives
    > who put out St. Joseph statues when they want rain.

    Nor am I that brave :)

    The cult* of St. Christopher is very strong and widespread, I think mainly because so many of us
    find ourselves as travellers one way or another, and the legend of St. Christopher is a pretty one.

    In a way, it's like Jebediah Springfield: sure, in real life he was a pirate and failed assassin of
    George Washington, but the legend of his life has become more powerful than his real life, and
    embiggens the heart of many a man.

    *This is not a pejorative term in this context. It is the right and cromulent word for followers of
    a particular saint.

    "brifteur",
    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
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