fairing of front schock

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by rskenny, Oct 15, 2004.

  1. rskenny

    rskenny Guest

    If i could do just 1 upgrade this winter what would you do fairing or
    front shock. I live in the midwest so the winters arent super cold, 20
    maybe the average cold in jan.
    your thought would be helpfull
     
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  2. Edward Dolan

    Edward Dolan Guest

    "rskenny" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > If i could do just 1 upgrade this winter what would you do fairing or
    > front shock. I live in the midwest so the winters arent super cold, 20
    > maybe the average cold in jan.
    > your thought would be helpfull


    It is extremely difficult to cycle in the UPPER Midwest in the winter months
    because of the extreme cold. My advice is to forget about the fairing if you
    are getting it to cut down on the cold. Nothing can cut down on the cold
    here in Minnesota.

    The best thing you can do in January is to stay in your warm house and
    listen to the music of Beethoven on your stereo. Usually by March you can
    began to think about getting back on the bicycle. I do cycle all winter
    myself, but I have to dress like an Eskimo and I wear those 100 degree below
    zero boots so my feet don't freeze and fall off my legs. I sometimes spend
    more time dressing than I do cycling.

    --
    Regards,

    Ed Dolan - Minnesota
     
  3. DeVon

    DeVon Guest

    rskenny <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > If i could do just 1 upgrade this winter what would you do fairing or
    > front shock. I live in the midwest so the winters arent super cold, 20
    > maybe the average cold in jan.
    > your thought would be helpfull


    I ride a Vision R40 as my "winter" bike in extreme northern IN. I do
    find a fairing helps considerably with cold feet (I also use chemical
    hand warmers tucked on top of my toes inside neoprene booties). Be
    aware that, with most fairings, your face is in the slipstream of the
    fairing. No engineer here, but my perception is that my head and
    face suffer greater wind exposure with the fairing than without. I
    still find I can ride more comfortably with foot temps above freezing.

    I refuse to ride on ice and snow, or in temps below 20 F. Even so, in
    the last 5 years I have never gone more than 2 weeks without riding,
    and seldom more than 1 week. My "daily" rides do drop from 20-mile
    rides to 10-milers when temps are sub-freezing.
     
  4. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Edward Dolan wrote:

    > ... I do cycle all winter myself, but I have to dress like an Eskimo...


    Have you checked with Floyd to see if your Eskimo dress is authentic? ;)

    --
    Tom Sherman - Curmudgeon and Pedant
     
  5. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    DeVon wrote:

    > rskenny <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >>If i could do just 1 upgrade this winter what would you do fairing or
    >>front shock. I live in the midwest so the winters arent super cold, 20
    >>maybe the average cold in jan.
    >>your thought would be helpfull

    >
    >
    > I ride a Vision R40 as my "winter" bike in extreme northern IN. I do
    > find a fairing helps considerably with cold feet (I also use chemical
    > hand warmers tucked on top of my toes inside neoprene booties). Be
    > aware that, with most fairings, your face is in the slipstream of the
    > fairing. No engineer here, but my perception is that my head and
    > face suffer greater wind exposure with the fairing than without. I
    > still find I can ride more comfortably with foot temps above freezing....


    Having ridden in winter with a front fairing, I noticed a significant
    comfort difference when riding into a headwind (warmer) compared to
    riding into a crosswind (colder). The fairing is worth a subjective
    difference of 10-20 degrees Fahrenheit, particularly with narrow OSS
    that puts the rider's hands behind the fairing.

    If I had a bike or trike with USS and was riding in cold weather, I
    would consider rigging up some mini "hand fairings" - half of a 2-liter
    soft drink bottle might be a good starting point.

    The hardest problem for me is feet, since there is still not a SPuD
    compatible Sorel Caribou. :( Insulated pedal fairings might work, but
    would likely best be restricted to a trike, as getting in and out might
    be too slow and or cumbersome for single-track HPV use.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Curmudgeon and Pedant
     
  6. Edward Dolan

    Edward Dolan Guest

    "Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > DeVon wrote:
    >
    >> rskenny <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:<[email protected]>...
    >>
    >>>If i could do just 1 upgrade this winter what would you do fairing or
    >>>front shock. I live in the midwest so the winters arent super cold, 20
    >>>maybe the average cold in jan.
    >>>your thought would be helpfull

    >>
    >>
    >> I ride a Vision R40 as my "winter" bike in extreme northern IN. I do
    >> find a fairing helps considerably with cold feet (I also use chemical
    >> hand warmers tucked on top of my toes inside neoprene booties). Be
    >> aware that, with most fairings, your face is in the slipstream of the
    >> fairing. No engineer here, but my perception is that my head and
    >> face suffer greater wind exposure with the fairing than without. I
    >> still find I can ride more comfortably with foot temps above freezing....

    >
    > Having ridden in winter with a front fairing, I noticed a significant
    > comfort difference when riding into a headwind (warmer) compared to riding
    > into a crosswind (colder). The fairing is worth a subjective difference of
    > 10-20 degrees Fahrenheit, particularly with narrow OSS that puts the
    > rider's hands behind the fairing.
    >
    > If I had a bike or trike with USS and was riding in cold weather, I would
    > consider rigging up some mini "hand fairings" - half of a 2-liter soft
    > drink bottle might be a good starting point.


    The only solution for keeping your hands warm when riding a recumbent in the
    winter here in Minnesota is to find the largest mittens (not gloves) and
    wear them religiously. Anything other than that and the cold will defeat
    you.

    > The hardest problem for me is feet, since there is still not a SPuD
    > compatible Sorel Caribou. :( Insulated pedal fairings might work, but
    > would likely best be restricted to a trike, as getting in and out might be
    > too slow and or cumbersome for single-track HPV use.


    I have often thought of mounting Bunsen burners on the pedals and have the
    flame directly pointed at my toes. Frankly, when the temp gets into the
    20's, it is best just to give it up as a lost cause.

    --
    Regards,

    Ed Dolan - Minnesota
     
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