fairings- I'm a believer

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Rich Westerman, May 17, 2003.

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  1. Here in deepest Illinois we've been having a windy spring- to say the least. Today it was gusting 50
    mph and blowing steadily at 30 mph (courtesy of the local weather phone.) I've been riding my V2
    without the fairing lately 'cause I like the breeze but today I put it back on and headed out into
    the wind to see if the reports of its benefits are valid. Well they sure are- I was able to
    comfortably maintain 12-14 mph directly into the wind, though it did push me around a bit. I'll bet
    I looked like I was driving drunk! The best part was on the way back, though. I had the wind
    directly behind or on my quarters the whole way and what a blast. When the wind was on the quarter
    to just abaft the beam, I could actually feel the push of the wind and could have maintained 10 mph
    without even pedaling much. Curiously, the push was much less when I was running before the wind.
    Nice, but not as dramatic as the benefits of tacking. I was using cogs and rings I don't usually use
    here in FlatLand- cruising at just under 30 mph is something this 56 year old doesn't often enjoy.

    bring on the wind!

    rich
     
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  2. You sound like an ideal candidate for mounting a mast and a retractable sail on your bent.
    -------------------------------------
    "rich westerman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Here in deepest Illinois we've been having a windy spring- to say the
    least.
    > Today it was gusting 50 mph and blowing steadily at 30 mph (courtesy of
    the
    > local weather phone.) I've been riding my V2 without the fairing lately 'cause I like the breeze
    > but today I put it back on and headed out into the wind to see if the reports of its benefits are
    > valid. Well they sure are- I was able to comfortably maintain 12-14 mph directly into the wind,
    > though it did push me around a bit. I'll bet I looked like
    I
    > was driving drunk! The best part was on the way back, though. I had the wind directly behind or on
    > my quarters the whole way and what a blast. When the wind was on
    the
    > quarter to just abaft the beam, I could actually feel the push of the wind and could have
    > maintained 10 mph without even pedaling much. Curiously, the push was much less when I was running
    > before the wind.
    Nice,
    > but not as dramatic as the benefits of tacking. I was using cogs and
    rings
    > I don't usually use here in FlatLand- cruising at just under 30 mph is something this 56 year old
    > doesn't often enjoy.
    >
    > bring on the wind!
    >
    > rich
     
  3. Wile E.Coyote <[email protected]> wrote:
    : You sound like an ideal candidate for mounting a mast and a retractable sail on your bent.

    http://www.ihpva.org/IHPVA/ihpvarules.html:

    3.1.6 Geometry: The vehicle geometry may not be alterable during use except for steering purposes;
    i.e. sails or moving control surfaces specifically intended to enhance the sailing
    characteristics of the vehicle are not permitted.

    Too bad :)

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  4. What I was thinking when I wrote that was very often on my rides I have noticed...as everyone else
    has, when the wind is at your back pedaling is easy and sometimes not needed. IF the backrest of
    your bent could be fitted with retractable BAT Wings that could suddely fold out to catch the
    wind...you'd go like a Bat outta Hell.
    PS sorry if anyone just coughed up their morning coffee on their keyboard re: Bent Bat Wings.
    ----------------------------
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Wile E.Coyote <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : You sound like an ideal candidate for mounting a mast and a retractable
    sail
    > : on your bent.
    >
    > http://www.ihpva.org/IHPVA/ihpvarules.html:
    >
    > 3.1.6 Geometry: The vehicle geometry may not be alterable during use except for steering purposes;
    > i.e. sails or moving control surfaces specifically intended to enhance the sailing
    > characteristics of the vehicle are not permitted.
    >
    > Too bad :)
    >
    > --
    > Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  5. Greg Dunn

    Greg Dunn Guest

    >>bat wings>>

    Screw 3.1.6. Sounds like a great idea to me.

    --
    Greg Dunn

    "Wile E.Coyote" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What I was thinking when I wrote that was very often on my rides I have noticed...as everyone else
    > has, when the wind is at your back pedaling is easy and sometimes not needed. IF the backrest of
    > your bent could be fitted with retractable BAT Wings
    that
    > could suddely fold out to catch the wind...you'd go like a Bat outta Hell.
    > PS sorry if anyone just coughed up their morning coffee on their keyboard re: Bent Bat Wings.
    > ----------------------------
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Wile E.Coyote <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > : You sound like an ideal candidate for mounting a mast and a
    retractable
    > sail
    > > : on your bent.
    > >
    > > http://www.ihpva.org/IHPVA/ihpvarules.html:
    > >
    > > 3.1.6 Geometry: The vehicle geometry may not be alterable during use except for steering
    > > purposes; i.e. sails or moving control surfaces specifically intended to enhance the sailing
    > > characteristics of the vehicle are not permitted.
    > >
    > > Too bad :)
    > >
    > > --
    > > Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  6. "Wile E.Coyote" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > IF the backrest of your bent could be fitted with retractable BAT Wings that could suddely fold
    > out to catch the wind...you'd go like a Bat outta Hell.
    > >

    ROTFLMAO! My fairing is a large Zzipper fairing, reversed, then mounted on the rollbar forward to my
    knees: like a jet cockpit I can see it now- batwings out- whoosh!! Oh; the thought!!!

    Chris Jordan Santa Cruz, CA.
     
  7. Charlie

    Charlie New Member

    Joined:
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    Interesting about the wind pushing/pulling you. Years ago when in the U.S. Navy and stationed at Good Fellow A.F.B in San Angelo, TX, I made a 100 plus mile bike trip with a buddy. It was NOT on a recumbent. When the wind came from the side I could turn my body and it would act like a sail.

    I have wondered for years if you could rig up something like verticle venetion blinds that would fit with the frame of the bicycle. These could be asjusted to a position to take advantage of the wind. Better yet, with a set of springs, their position could change with each gust of wind - maintaining the optimum position. Just a thought.

    PREDICAMENT: I am probably going to buy an older Linear LWB with above seat stearing. Will it be possible - if I later want it - to buy a fairing for this bike. It will be my first recumbent. I am amazed at the EXPENSE of these recumbent bikes!!!!!

    Charlie
    [email protected]
    Northeast Texas
     
  8. the real braincell killer would be to have a Sail on the back of your bent and in the trailer you
    are pulling you are using a 40 HP gas motor to power an airplane propeller to maintain a constant
    wind speed into the Sail...I crack myself up sometimes
    --------------------------
    "Steve McDonald" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > In the Summer of 1985, a traveler known only to us as Sinbad the Sailor, spent a few weeks in
    > Eugene, visiting the bicycling community. He was making a circuit around the entire U.S. on a
    > two-wheeled recumbent equipped with a sail. It was mounted behind his seat and could easily
    > be set at any angle and locked. He was very adept at using it to advantage and never was seen
    > to capsize. I wonder if anyone else remembers him? We made quite a spectacle cruising the
    > streets with him. We had a few quadraped tricycles and I towed a large rocket-shaped trailer.
    > Motor traffic was very deferential to us-----perhaps they thought we were alien invaders with
    > ray guns.
    >
    > Steve McDonald
     
  9. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    "Wile E.Coyote" wrote:
    >
    > the real braincell killer would be to have a Sail on the back of your bent and in the trailer you
    > are pulling you are using a 40 HP gas motor to power an airplane propeller to maintain a constant
    > wind speed into the Sail...I crack myself up sometimes

    I guarantee that you will run out of gas every time you try to jump a canyon. ;)

    Beep Beep!

    Tom Sherman - Various HPV's Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  10. [email protected] (Steve McDonald) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > In the Summer of 1985, a traveler known only to us as Sinbad the Sailor, spent a few weeks in
    > Eugene, visiting the bicycling community. Steve McDonald

    Ah, another Eugenian... but I don't recall seeing Sinbad.

    I tried something similar, back in the 60s. I delivered the Oregonian (big route, few subscribers).
    I noticed a definate wind drag, so I rigged a brace made out of old rebar to the handlebars and
    paper bag support.

    When riding with the wind, I'd flip the bag cover up over the support... a tiny sail. (It helped,
    but heaven help you if a gust hit from the side.) <g
     
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