Fall protection for mtn biker wrists?



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D

Destroy

Guest
Getting into technical stuff with a bit of height involved makes me ponder protection. I know the
usual helmet, knee and elbow pads are fine but what about one's wrists?

Being a mechanic my wrists are extremely important to my lively-hood. Is there anything one can wear
mtn biking to help prevent wrist injury in the event of a fall?

I know there are some sort of wrist guards that rollerbladers often wear but I've never seen or used
them and wonder if they could be fitted somehow to be comfortable and workable enough to ride with?

Any suggestions on this topic?
 
P

Pete

Guest
"Destroy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Getting into technical stuff with a bit of height involved makes me ponder protection. I know the
> usual helmet, knee and elbow pads are fine but what about one's wrists?
>
> Being a mechanic my wrists are extremely important to my lively-hood. Is there anything one can
> wear mtn biking to help prevent wrist injury in the event of a fall?
>
> I know there are some sort of wrist guards that rollerbladers often wear but I've never seen or
> used them and wonder if they could be fitted somehow to be comfortable and workable enough to
> ride with?

Blader wristguards are built to encourage a slide to dissipate the energy in a fall. As opposed to
hitting the ground and 'grabbing', causing a lot ot rotational/twisting force on the wrist.

Probably wouldn't help much on dirt.

Pete
 
L

L Hays

Guest
"Destroy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Getting into technical stuff with a bit of height involved makes me ponder protection. I know the
> usual helmet, knee and elbow pads are fine but what about one's wrists?
>
> Being a mechanic my wrists are extremely important to my lively-hood. Is there anything one can
> wear mtn biking to help prevent wrist injury in the event of a fall?
>
> I know there are some sort of wrist guards that rollerbladers often wear but I've never seen or
> used them and wonder if they could be fitted somehow to be comfortable and workable enough to
> ride with?
>
> Any suggestions on this topic?
>

The wrist guards I had for rollerblading had a hard plastic piece that ran down the underside of the
forearm and into the palm of the hand. There would be no way for it to be functional if the plastic
piece was cut away to grip the bars. I sat and tried to figure out a way to make it work but you
would need some support on one side of the wrist or the other if you want it to be functional as a
wrist guard.

Maybe wrapping the wrists could serve as adequate support.

Lance
 
S

Slacker

Guest
"Destroy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Getting into technical stuff with a bit of height involved makes me ponder protection. I know the
> usual helmet, knee and elbow pads are fine but what about one's wrists?
>
> Being a mechanic my wrists are extremely important to my lively-hood. Is there anything one can
> wear mtn biking to help prevent wrist injury in the event of a fall?
>
> I know there are some sort of wrist guards that rollerbladers often wear but I've never seen or
> used them and wonder if they could be fitted somehow to be comfortable and workable enough to
> ride with?
>
> Any suggestions on this topic?

http://pricepoint.com/product877.html

--
Slacker
 
J

Jonathan Bond

Guest
Destroy wrote:
> Getting into technical stuff with a bit of height involved makes me ponder protection. I know the
> usual helmet, knee and elbow pads are fine but what about one's wrists?
>
> Being a mechanic my wrists are extremely important to my lively-hood. Is there anything one can
> wear mtn biking to help prevent wrist injury in the event of a fall?
>
> I know there are some sort of wrist guards that rollerbladers often wear but I've never seen or
> used them and wonder if they could be fitted somehow to be comfortable and workable enough to
> ride with?
>
> Any suggestions on this topic?

On biking stuff, you're much, much more likely to injure your collarbone than your wrist. Wear
gloves so your hands don't get scraped to hell, and learn how to fall. Maybe see if your local dojo
(karate studio, or a friend who knows martial arts, can teach you how to take some rolling falls,
it'll help a lot. Rollarblading falls are likely to be straight forwards, with the body pivoting
around the feet or knee area. Biking falls, if you end, are going to be pivoting from much higher,
and you're not going to fall straight ahead like you would rollerblading (and if you do, you're not
going to have the forward momentum you would with rollerblades). I wouldn't worry about the
wrists... collarbones are a lot more likely to be broken. Teach yourself to fall with bent elbows,
it'll make all the difference in the world.

Only way I've ever hurt my wrists biking was when my grips were spinning, and they spun forwards
while I was hopping off a little dropoff... landed with my wrist spun forwards and down, did NOT
feel good, but they were fine in a day or two, and still functional till then.

Jon "Comman" Bond
 
D

D T W .../\\...

Guest
"Destroy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Getting into technical stuff with a bit of height involved makes me ponder protection. I know the
> usual helmet, knee and elbow pads are fine but what about one's wrists?
>
> Being a mechanic my wrists are extremely important to my lively-hood. Is there anything one can
> wear mtn biking to help prevent wrist injury in the event of a fall?
>
> I know there are some sort of wrist guards that rollerbladers often wear but I've never seen or
> used them and wonder if they could be fitted somehow to be comfortable and workable enough to
> ride with?
>
> Any suggestions on this topic?
>

I've been using the Six Six One race model, forearm / elbow pads. They have a hard cup at the elbow
and another on the forearm. It stops just short of the wrist joint. So long as you don't put your
hands out - try to do a handstand, they should give you good protection. You just need to remember
to fall on the pads not your hands. Could be difficult when things are happenin in a blur! ;-( This
design seems common to most elbow / forearm protectors I've seen, albeit only pictures on the web.

DTW .../\.../\.../\...
 
L

L Hays

Guest
<snippage>

>
> Jon "Comman" Bond
>
>

You're getting there Jon!

Lance "Sarge" Hays
 
M

Michael Dart

Guest
"Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "Destroy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> > Getting into technical stuff with a bit of height involved makes me ponder protection. I know
> > the usual helmet, knee and elbow pads are fine but what about one's wrists?
> >
> > Being a mechanic my wrists are extremely important to my lively-hood. Is there anything one can
> > wear mtn biking to help prevent wrist injury in the event of a fall?
> >
> > I know there are some sort of wrist guards that rollerbladers often wear but I've never seen or
> > used them and wonder if they could be fitted somehow to be comfortable and workable enough to
> > ride with?
> >
> > Any suggestions on this topic?
>
>
> http://pricepoint.com/product877.html
>
> --
> Slacker
>
>

That's the trick there. Be sure to buy two.

Mike
 
J

Jonathan Bond

Guest
L Hays wrote:
> <snippage>
>
>>Jon "Comman" Bond
>>
>>
>
>
> You're getting there Jon!
>
> Lance "Sarge" Hays
>
>

Yup. Didn't want to go cold turkey, you know.

Jon "Comma" Bond or should that be Bond "Comma" Jon ?
 
P

Penny S.

Guest
>> Getting into technical stuff with a bit of height involved makes me ponder protection. I know the
>> usual helmet, knee and elbow pads are fine but what about one's wrists?
>>
>> Being a mechanic my wrists are extremely important to my lively-hood. Is there anything one can
>> wear mtn biking to help prevent wrist injury in the event of a fall?
>
>>
>> I know there are some sort of wrist guards that rollerbladers often wear but I've never seen or
>> used them and wonder if they could be fitted somehow to be comfortable and workable enough to
>> ride with?
>>
>> Any suggestions on this topic?
>
learn how to tuck and roll?
 
C

Chris

Guest
> Being a mechanic my wrists are extremely important to my lively-hood. Is there anything one can
> wear mtn biking to help prevent wrist injury in the event of a fall?

I used to kick my own ass falling off the bike, and then I decided to teach myself how to tuck and
roll...I spent ten minutes in the yard jumping onto my upper back (like your doing a front flip off
a diving board) and rolling over into first a seated position, then a stand. Jump forward, remember
to tuck your head, and roll right over onto the soles of your feet.

It rules ass when you go right over the bars, tuck and roll, and end up running down the hill...just
fight the instinct that wants to hold on to the bars.

And if you break your neck jumping around your house, I am not accepting responsibility :)

Chris
 
W

Westie

Guest
"Jonathan Bond" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]... <snip>

> On biking stuff, you're much, much more likely to injure your collarbone than your wrist. Wear
> gloves so your hands don't get scraped to hell, and learn how to fall. Maybe see if your local
> dojo (karate studio, or a friend who knows martial arts, can teach you how to take some rolling
> falls, it'll help a lot. Rollarblading falls are likely to be straight forwards, with the body
> pivoting around the feet or knee area. Biking falls, if you end, are going to be pivoting from
> much higher, and you're not going to fall straight ahead like you would rollerblading (and if you
> do, you're not going to have the forward momentum you would with rollerblades). I wouldn't worry
> about the wrists... collarbones are a lot more likely to be broken. Teach yourself to fall with
> bent elbows, it'll make all the difference in the world.

Unless, of course, you gracefully spin/sommersalt through the air and land hard on the back of your
shoulder with body mass following through, resulting in completely separated AC joint and large
bruise on shoulder blade about 6" diameter! Otherwise, very sound advice. I couldn't agree more.

Westie :)

>
> Only way I've ever hurt my wrists biking was when my grips were spinning, and they spun forwards
> while I was hopping off a little dropoff... landed with my wrist spun forwards and down, did NOT
> feel good, but they were fine in a day or two, and still functional till then.
>
> Jon "Comman" Bond
 
T

Trentus

Guest
"Destroy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Getting into technical stuff with a bit of height involved makes me ponder protection. I know the
> usual helmet, knee and elbow pads are fine but what about one's wrists?
>
> Being a mechanic my wrists are extremely important to my lively-hood. Is there anything one can
> wear mtn biking to help prevent wrist injury in the event of a fall?
>
> I know there are some sort of wrist guards that rollerbladers often wear but I've never seen or
> used them and wonder if they could be fitted somehow to be comfortable and workable enough to
> ride with?
>
> Any suggestions on this topic?

I've fallen far more times than I'd like to admit, and certainly more often than I'd like to repeat,
but never hurt my wrists, it's always my right knee that takes the pounding. After last weekend's
fall that also broke my forks, I've decided this knee has had it's LAST pounding, from now on I'm
getting some body armour, and starting with knee pads in the mean time.

Trentus
 
S

Shaun Rimmer

Guest
Destroy <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Getting into technical stuff with a bit of height involved makes me ponder protection. I know the
> usual helmet, knee and elbow pads are fine but what about one's wrists?
>
> Being a mechanic my wrists are extremely important to my lively-hood. Is there anything one can
> wear mtn biking to help prevent wrist injury in the event of a fall?
>
> I know there are some sort of wrist guards that rollerbladers often wear but I've never seen or
> used them and wonder if they could be fitted somehow to be comfortable and workable enough to
> ride with?
>
> Any suggestions on this topic?

You need a pencil neck brace.

Shaun aRe - HTH.
 
B

Bill Wheeler

Guest
On Fri, 31 Jan 2003 01:07:22 GMT, Destroy <[email protected]> wrote:

>Getting into technical stuff with a bit of height involved makes me ponder protection. I know the
>usual helmet, knee and elbow pads are fine but what about one's wrists?
>
>Being a mechanic my wrists are extremely important to my lively-hood. Is there anything one can
>wear mtn biking to help prevent wrist injury in the event of a fall?
>
>I know there are some sort of wrist guards that rollerbladers often wear but I've never seen or
>used them and wonder if they could be fitted somehow to be comfortable and workable enough to
>ride with?
>
>Any suggestions on this topic?

proper skills will protect you wrists.

peace, Bill

The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind should give
an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
:-]
 
D

Dave

Guest
"Bill Wheeler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> On Fri, 31 Jan 2003 01:07:22 GMT, Destroy <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >Getting into technical stuff with a bit of height involved makes me ponder protection. I know the
> >usual helmet, knee and elbow pads are fine but what about one's wrists?
> >
> >Being a mechanic my wrists are extremely important to my lively-hood. Is there anything one can
> >wear mtn biking to help prevent wrist injury in the event of a fall?
> >
> >I know there are some sort of wrist guards that rollerbladers often wear but I've never seen or
> >used them and wonder if they could be fitted somehow to be comfortable and workable enough to
> >ride with?
> >
> >Any suggestions on this topic?
>
> proper skills will protect you wrists.
>
> peace, Bill
>
>

Couldn't agree more! and Thanks for that info, JD jr.

Dave (what no mention of the adult BMX?)
 
P

Penny S.

Guest
Trentus wrote:
>>
> I've fallen far more times than I'd like to admit, and certainly more often than I'd like to
> repeat, but never hurt my wrists, it's always my right knee that takes the pounding. After last
> weekend's fall that also broke my forks, I've decided this knee has had it's LAST pounding, from
> now on I'm getting some body armour, and starting with knee pads in the mean time.
>
> Trentus

I really like the 661 4x4.

penny
 
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