Farfel and Mushrooms

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Melba's Jammin', Dec 8, 2005.

  1. Paraphrasing The Second Avenue Deli's recipe from their cookbook:

    Farfel and Mushrooms

    3 tbsp corn oil
    2 cups chopped onion
    2 cups scrubbed mushrooms, chopped into 3/4" slices, about 3/16" thick
    (look, that's what it says, OK?)
    2 cups uncooked egg barley
    3 cups clear chicken soup or stock
    Salt if needed
    1/4 tsp pepper

    Heat 2 tbsp of the oil and lightly brown the onion. Removed with a
    slotted spoon to a bowl. Brown the mushrooms and add to the onions; set
    aside.

    Preheat oven to 325 deg. Pour egg barley into a pan (maybe 9x13), add a
    tbsp corn oil and mix well. Bake for 20 minutes, stirring halfway
    through, so it browns evenly. While farfel is baking heat the chicken
    broth and keep it warm. Remove the pan from the oven, add the
    onion-mushroom mix and add the soup. Reduce oven temp to 300 deg and
    bake for another 30 minutes or until all soup is absorbed, stirring
    after 15 minutes. Remove and serve.

    All righty. Here's my question: This is the second recipe from that
    book wherein one bakes, roasts, fries, toasts, or otherwise treats the
    pasta or the grain before "cooking" it. What's the point? Is it a
    truly necessary step? How do you suppose it came to be?

    I await your counsel and advise. And since I have more homemade chicken
    soup at the ready, and a mess of various already-sliced mushrooms at
    hand (and the egg barley on hand) I think I'll make maybe half a recipe
    for supper.

    Having the egg barley on hand makes me think I've done this once, but I
    don't remember a) using a recipe ("That's different") or roasting or
    toasting the egg barley. I don't think I baked it, either. I should
    maybe check with Sheryl about this.

    -Barb
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-6-05, Skyline Aglow - the 35mm picture
     
    Tags:


  2. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Thu, 08 Dec 2005 09:29:11 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >All righty. Here's my question: This is the second recipe from that
    >book wherein one bakes, roasts, fries, toasts, or otherwise treats the
    >pasta or the grain before "cooking" it. What's the point? Is it a
    >truly necessary step? How do you suppose it came to be?


    I once asked a Japanese roommate why she toasted the seaweed before
    making something where the seaweed would end up being soft anyway (the
    rice balls, maybe). She answered "The same reason you toast bread- it
    changes the flavor. " Well, of course bread gets crispy too, but the
    flavor thing is important in toast. Compare the difference between
    toasted American bread (made with milk and/or butter) and
    Italian/French bread (with no milk or dairy).

    Pan toasting rice, bulgur, and other starchy things etc. before
    further cooking is common in some dishes (eg. pilaf) for that reason-
    it gives it a bit of "je ne sais quois" (richness, nuttiness) in the
    flavor.

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Paraphrasing The Second Avenue Deli's recipe from their cookbook:
    >
    > Farfel and Mushrooms

    (recipe snipped)
    I can only surmise how delicious it would be if I'd had the farfel and
    didn't need to substitute orzo pasta. Pics and details are on my
    website. <I blush for embarrass>
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-8-05, My Farfel-less
    Farfel with Mushrooms. Jeez!
     
  4. Jude

    Jude Guest

    What exactly is "egg barley"? Itsounds like a type of pasta, rather
    than an actual grain of narley? I've only used Quaker quick-cook pearl
    barley in soups or as a side dish. Would I find this near the pastas?
    Sounds like this recipe is right up my alley!
     
  5. Jude wrote:
    > What exactly is "egg barley"? Itsounds like a type of pasta, rather
    > than an actual grain of narley? I've only used Quaker quick-cook pearl
    > barley in soups or as a side dish. Would I find this near the pastas?
    > Sounds like this recipe is right up my alley!
    >


    it is an egg-enriched noodle product cut into small bits.


    --

    saerah

    "Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
    disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
    -Baruch Spinoza

    "There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
    what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
    and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
    is another theory which states that this has already happened."
    -Douglas Adams
     
  6. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > Paraphrasing The Second Avenue Deli's recipe from their cookbook:
    >
    > Farfel and Mushrooms
    >
    > 3 tbsp corn oil
    > 2 cups chopped onion
    > 2 cups scrubbed mushrooms, chopped into 3/4" slices, about 3/16" thick
    > (look, that's what it says, OK?)
    > 2 cups uncooked egg barley
    > 3 cups clear chicken soup or stock
    > Salt if needed
    > 1/4 tsp pepper
    >
    > Heat 2 tbsp of the oil and lightly brown the onion. Removed with a
    > slotted spoon to a bowl. Brown the mushrooms and add to the onions; set
    > aside.
    >
    > Preheat oven to 325 deg. Pour egg barley into a pan (maybe 9x13), add a
    > tbsp corn oil and mix well. Bake for 20 minutes, stirring halfway
    > through, so it browns evenly. While farfel is baking heat the chicken
    > broth and keep it warm. Remove the pan from the oven, add the
    > onion-mushroom mix and add the soup. Reduce oven temp to 300 deg and
    > bake for another 30 minutes or until all soup is absorbed, stirring
    > after 15 minutes. Remove and serve.
    >
    > All righty. Here's my question: This is the second recipe from that
    > book wherein one bakes, roasts, fries, toasts, or otherwise treats the
    > pasta or the grain before "cooking" it. What's the point? Is it a
    > truly necessary step? How do you suppose it came to be?
    >
    > I await your counsel and advise. And since I have more homemade chicken
    > soup at the ready, and a mess of various already-sliced mushrooms at
    > hand (and the egg barley on hand) I think I'll make maybe half a recipe
    > for supper.
    >
    > Having the egg barley on hand makes me think I've done this once, but I
    > don't remember a) using a recipe ("That's different") or roasting or
    > toasting the egg barley. I don't think I baked it, either. I should
    > maybe check with Sheryl about this.


    Culinarilly "farfel" always means matzo broken into small bits,
    properly written "matzo farfel". Egg barley is egg noodles shaped
    like large couscous. There is also the same egg barley available in
    the toasted form. Egg barley and matzo farfel are not related,
    obviously. Some refer to egg barley as "farfel" but culinarilly that's
    highly misleading unless one is privy to the recipe or is a Jew with
    culinary skills who can decipher by *context*, because in Yiddish
    farfel can refer to any small bits... kinda like Jewish pixels. Your
    recipe above should correctly be called "Egg Barley with Mushrooms",
    hasn't a whit to do with matzo farfel. *Any* recipe would need to say
    "matzo farfel" ... "farfel" by itself is meaningless, as meaningless in
    the culinary sense as a cup of pixels. The 2nd Avenue Deli is in
    error, not only incorrect, their nomenclature is sacrilegious... they
    should be ashamed.

    Culinarilly farfel is always written "matzo farfel"... otherwise it
    means bubkes.

    Sheldon
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Jude" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What exactly is "egg barley"? Itsounds like a type of pasta, rather
    > than an actual grain of narley? I've only used Quaker quick-cook pearl
    > barley in soups or as a side dish. Would I find this near the pastas?
    > Sounds like this recipe is right up my alley!


    It's pasta. The Second Avenue Deli cookbook says this: "Dishes made
    with egg barley, or farfel, are generally eaten at Rosh Hashanah; the
    grain-shaped pasta symbolizes the seeds of an abundant harvest in the
    year ahead." Since it turns out I DIDN'T have egg barley, Ida Know
    where it's found -- surely a Jewish Deli/Grocer. Looks like it's gonna
    be lunch at Cecil's again soon. :)

    AWTTW: I used an All-Clad 3-quart sauté pan for this project and it
    took only 10 minutes in the oven to brown the pasta for combining with
    the other ingredients‹not the 30 minutes in the recipe. I'm glad I
    checked it when I did.

    You might also enjoy this recipe for a side. I found it here years ago
    and I've posted it here a number of times since. See my note at the
    end:

    * Exported from MasterCook Mac *

    Rice Pilaf

    Recipe By : Posted to rec.food.cooking by Barb Schaller, 12-9-05
    Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:35
    Categories : Entrees

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 cup long grain white rice
    12 pieces vermicelli pasta noodles -- (12 to 15)
    2 C chicken bouillon
    1 tbsp butter -- (1 to 2)

    Melt butter in saucepan. Add rice and stir now and then til it
    browns...be careful not to let it burn. When rice is evenly browned, add
    the vermicelli which you have broken into 2-3 in lengths and the
    bouillon.

    Bring to a boil, reduce flame, cover, and simmer til liquid is
    absorbed...probably about 20 minutes or so.

    Serve as is or with a little pat of butter.

    If you try it, let me know how you like it.

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Per serving (excluding unknown items): 36 Calories; 3g Fat (84% calories
    from fat); 1g Protein; 1g Carbohydrate; 8mg Cholesterol; 771mg Sodium
    Food Exchanges: 1/2 Fat

    NOTES : [email protected], 2/15/97, posted to r.f.cooking: :This recipe
    came from my 4th grade teacher's mother, a lovely Armenian
    woman, nearly 50 years ago! I wouldn't make pilaf any other way....and
    it always gets raves. Elizabeth Dean Brooks, rec.food.cooking"

    I use far more pasta than the 12 pieces of vermicelli -- more like 3/4
    cup rice, 1/4 cup pasta. Think Rice-a-Roni without being so salty.

    _____
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-8-05, My Farfel-less
    Farfel with Mushrooms. Jeez!
     
  8. Larry LaMere

    Larry LaMere Guest

    On Thu, 08 Dec 2005 09:29:11 -0600, Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Paraphrasing The Second Avenue Deli's recipe from their cookbook:
    >
    >Farfel and Mushrooms
    >
    >3 tbsp corn oil
    >2 cups chopped onion
    >2 cups scrubbed mushrooms, chopped into 3/4" slices, about 3/16" thick
    >(look, that's what it says, OK?)
    >2 cups uncooked egg barley
    >3 cups clear chicken soup or stock
    >Salt if needed
    >1/4 tsp pepper
    >
    >Heat 2 tbsp of the oil and lightly brown the onion. Removed with a
    >slotted spoon to a bowl. Brown the mushrooms and add to the onions; set
    >aside.
    >
    >Preheat oven to 325 deg. Pour egg barley into a pan (maybe 9x13), add a
    >tbsp corn oil and mix well. Bake for 20 minutes, stirring halfway
    >through, so it browns evenly. While farfel is baking heat the chicken
    >broth and keep it warm. Remove the pan from the oven, add the
    >onion-mushroom mix and add the soup. Reduce oven temp to 300 deg and
    >bake for another 30 minutes or until all soup is absorbed, stirring
    >after 15 minutes. Remove and serve.
    >
    >All righty. Here's my question: This is the second recipe from that
    >book wherein one bakes, roasts, fries, toasts, or otherwise treats the
    >pasta or the grain before "cooking" it. What's the point? Is it a
    >truly necessary step? How do you suppose it came to be?
    >
    >I await your counsel and advise. And since I have more homemade chicken
    >soup at the ready, and a mess of various already-sliced mushrooms at
    >hand (and the egg barley on hand) I think I'll make maybe half a recipe
    >for supper.
    >
    >Having the egg barley on hand makes me think I've done this once, but I
    >don't remember a) using a recipe ("That's different") or roasting or
    >toasting the egg barley. I don't think I baked it, either. I should
    >maybe check with Sheryl about this.
    >
    >-Barb



    I haven't seen Farfel in years, but I didn't know they killed and ate him.

    N*E*S*T*L*E*S nestleys is the very best cho-o-o-ocolate.

    Sorry but it was the first thing Im thought of from the title.
     
  9. aem

    aem Guest

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > You might also enjoy this recipe for a side.
    >
    > Rice Pilaf
    > [snip]
    > NOTES : [email protected], 2/15/97, posted to r.f.cooking: :This recipe
    > came from my 4th grade teacher's mother, a lovely Armenian
    > woman, nearly 50 years ago! I wouldn't make pilaf any other way....and
    > it always gets raves. Elizabeth Dean Brooks, rec.food.cooking"
    > [snip]


    I make this exact dish, ever since learning it from my next door
    neighbor, who was Armenian. Now if only I could make those two-layer
    meatballs (kufta)... -aem
     
  10. Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Paraphrasing The Second Avenue Deli's recipe from their cookbook:
    >>
    >>Farfel and Mushrooms

    >
    > (recipe snipped)
    > I can only surmise how delicious it would be if I'd had the farfel and
    > didn't need to substitute orzo pasta. Pics and details are on my
    > website. <I blush for embarrass>


    Farfel used to be sold in little boxes, just as the rest of the
    noodles, in the kosher section of every supermarket.

    After the experience I had with the Egg Bowties last month, I was less
    surprised when I could not find Farfel, either when I looked for it
    today. Finally I found weird little cellophane packages with Egg
    Barley, one from Streit's and one from an Israeli company.

    Orzo is nothing like Farfel, who are tiny pieces of egg noodles, baked
    or dried and are like tiny Fleckerln. No self respecting Farfel would
    ever try to look like a grain of rice.
     
  11. Margaret Suran <[email protected]> looking for trouble wrote
    in news:[email protected]:

    >
    >
    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Paraphrasing The Second Avenue Deli's recipe from their cookbook:
    >>>
    >>>Farfel and Mushrooms

    >>
    >> (recipe snipped)
    >> I can only surmise how delicious it would be if I'd had the farfel and
    >> didn't need to substitute orzo pasta. Pics and details are on my
    >> website. <I blush for embarrass>

    >
    > Farfel used to be sold in little boxes, just as the rest of the
    > noodles, in the kosher section of every supermarket.
    >
    > After the experience I had with the Egg Bowties last month, I was less
    > surprised when I could not find Farfel, either when I looked for it
    > today. Finally I found weird little cellophane packages with Egg
    > Barley, one from Streit's and one from an Israeli company.
    >
    > Orzo is nothing like Farfel, who are tiny pieces of egg noodles, baked
    > or dried and are like tiny Fleckerln. No self respecting Farfel would
    > ever try to look like a grain of rice.
    >


    Margaret, email me the brand of Farfel and Egg Bowties you want and I'll
    see if I can find them here. We have lots of little stores that carry a
    lot of goods catering to different groups. I'll mail you some if I can
    find them. I'm leaving tomorrow afternoon and will be gone a few days.
    I'm coming back early, I'm not traveling in this weather with a sick dog
    and cat. I should be back on Tuesday or so. I'll still be posting and
    answering my email though.

    Michael

    --
    ....Bacteria: The rear entrance to a cafeteria.

    All gramatical errors and misspellings due to Ramsey the cyber kitten. He
    now owns all keyboards and computing devices in the household and has the
    final say on what is, or is not, posted.
    Send email to dog30 at charter dot net
     
  12. Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:
    > Margaret Suran <[email protected]> looking for trouble wrote
    > in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >
    >>
    >>Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>
    >>>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>> Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Paraphrasing The Second Avenue Deli's recipe from their cookbook:
    >>>>
    >>>>Farfel and Mushrooms
    >>>
    >>>(recipe snipped)
    >>>I can only surmise how delicious it would be if I'd had the farfel and
    >>>didn't need to substitute orzo pasta. Pics and details are on my
    >>>website. <I blush for embarrass>

    >>
    >>Farfel used to be sold in little boxes, just as the rest of the
    >>noodles, in the kosher section of every supermarket.
    >>
    >>After the experience I had with the Egg Bowties last month, I was less
    >>surprised when I could not find Farfel, either when I looked for it
    >>today. Finally I found weird little cellophane packages with Egg
    >>Barley, one from Streit's and one from an Israeli company.
    >>
    >>Orzo is nothing like Farfel, who are tiny pieces of egg noodles, baked
    >>or dried and are like tiny Fleckerln. No self respecting Farfel would
    >>ever try to look like a grain of rice.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Margaret, email me the brand of Farfel and Egg Bowties you want and I'll
    > see if I can find them here. We have lots of little stores that carry a
    > lot of goods catering to different groups. I'll mail you some if I can
    > find them. I'm leaving tomorrow afternoon and will be gone a few days.
    > I'm coming back early, I'm not traveling in this weather with a sick dog
    > and cat. I should be back on Tuesday or so. I'll still be posting and
    > answering my email though.
    >
    > Michael
    >

    Thank you, Michael, but I have no intention of making Egg Barley with
    Mushrooms or with anything else. I have a Chicken Place almost across
    the street on First Avenue and they make it better than I ever could.
    They also make good Kasha Varnishkes, even if they do not use
    authentic Egg Bowties. They use the Italian bowties.

    When are you leaving and when are you coming back, In Good Health?

    Thank you, Margaret
     
  13. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Margaret Suran wrote:
    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>Paraphrasing The Second Avenue Deli's recipe from their cookbook:
    > >>
    > >>Farfel and Mushrooms

    > >
    > > (recipe snipped)
    > > I can only surmise how delicious it would be if I'd had the farfel and
    > > didn't need to substitute orzo pasta. Pics and details are on my
    > > website. <I blush for embarrass>

    >
    > Farfel used to be sold in little boxes, just as the rest of the
    > noodles, in the kosher section of every supermarket.
    >
    > After the experience I had with the Egg Bowties last month, I was less
    > surprised when I could not find Farfel, either when I looked for it
    > today. Finally I found weird little cellophane packages with Egg
    > Barley, one from Streit's and one from an Israeli company.


    None of the Jewish food purveyers (Streit's, Goodman's, Manichewitz,
    etc.) label egg barley as farfel.... farfel (matzo farfel) is matzo
    bits, egg barley is an egg noodle product. Only the most ignorant
    hillybilly jews call egg barley farfel, they call all things that are
    little bits farfel, like their brains are one farfel.... and so I'm
    being quite generous because one farfel is a 1/4 bubke.

    Generally you will find a broader range of Jewish food products only
    just prior to the high holidays, and they cost substantially less then,
    that's when to stock up. That's when Jews eat these foods, because
    they are somehow required... which is why they actually resent these
    foods and don't typically eat them the rest of the year.... for
    example, matzo is symbolic of a very unsavory ordeal, most Jews don't
    eat matzo except during Passover (no such thing as wishing a Jew a
    "Happy Passover", that's an insult... it's "Good Passover"). Wishing a
    Jew a "Happy Passover" is ten times more offensive than wishing a Roman
    Cathelic a "Happy Crucifixtion".
     
  14. Margaret Suran <[email protected]> looking for trouble
    wrote in news:[email protected]:

    >
    >
    > Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:
    >> Margaret Suran <[email protected]> looking for trouble
    >> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >>
    >>
    >>>
    >>>Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>>> Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Paraphrasing The Second Avenue Deli's recipe from their cookbook:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Farfel and Mushrooms
    >>>>
    >>>>(recipe snipped)
    >>>>I can only surmise how delicious it would be if I'd had the farfel
    >>>>and didn't need to substitute orzo pasta. Pics and details are on
    >>>>my website. <I blush for embarrass>
    >>>
    >>>Farfel used to be sold in little boxes, just as the rest of the
    >>>noodles, in the kosher section of every supermarket.
    >>>
    >>>After the experience I had with the Egg Bowties last month, I was
    >>>less surprised when I could not find Farfel, either when I looked for
    >>>it today. Finally I found weird little cellophane packages with Egg
    >>>Barley, one from Streit's and one from an Israeli company.
    >>>
    >>>Orzo is nothing like Farfel, who are tiny pieces of egg noodles,
    >>>baked or dried and are like tiny Fleckerln. No self respecting
    >>>Farfel would ever try to look like a grain of rice.
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Margaret, email me the brand of Farfel and Egg Bowties you want and
    >> I'll see if I can find them here. We have lots of little stores that
    >> carry a lot of goods catering to different groups. I'll mail you
    >> some if I can find them. I'm leaving tomorrow afternoon and will be
    >> gone a few days. I'm coming back early, I'm not traveling in this
    >> weather with a sick dog and cat. I should be back on Tuesday or so.
    >> I'll still be posting and answering my email though.
    >>
    >> Michael
    >>

    > Thank you, Michael, but I have no intention of making Egg Barley with
    > Mushrooms or with anything else. I have a Chicken Place almost across
    > the street on First Avenue and they make it better than I ever could.
    > They also make good Kasha Varnishkes, even if they do not use
    > authentic Egg Bowties. They use the Italian bowties.
    >
    > When are you leaving and when are you coming back, In Good Health?
    >
    > Thank you, Margaret
    >


    All is well here Margaret, and thanks for asking. Shelly is sick but will
    never get better. Ramsey goes back to the vet on Tuesday and we'll know for
    sure if he has the dreaded FIP. Steven is taking over for a few days. I'm
    leaving tomorrow about 3pm and I'll return Tuesday morning. I want to be
    in on the vet visit with Ramsey. I'm taking some of Barb's Oriental
    almonds, a cheese ball, some home made fudge and a couple of other snacks
    with me. Steven has made a gorgonzola cheesecake but I'm forbidden from
    taking it ;) Kris and I will visit and play Rummiecube with Carla and her
    Steve. It'll be a fun few days and I'll get to horseback ride every day.
    I'm glad I'm not going for the full 2 weeks. I would miss home and my
    babies. Missy, Hoot and Bart are doing quite well except Bart will not
    come out of the basement. At least she's not freezing to death outside.

    Michael

    --
    ....Bacteria: The rear entrance to a cafeteria.

    All gramatical errors and misspellings due to Ramsey the cyber kitten. He
    now owns all keyboards and computing devices in the household and has the
    final say on what is, or is not, posted.
    Send email to dog30 at charter dot net
     
  15. Sheldon wrote:
    > Margaret Suran wrote:
    >
    >>Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>
    >>>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>> Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Paraphrasing The Second Avenue Deli's recipe from their cookbook:
    >>>>
    >>>>Farfel and Mushrooms
    >>>
    >>>(recipe snipped)
    >>>I can only surmise how delicious it would be if I'd had the farfel and
    >>>didn't need to substitute orzo pasta. Pics and details are on my
    >>>website. <I blush for embarrass>

    >>
    >>Farfel used to be sold in little boxes, just as the rest of the
    >>noodles, in the kosher section of every supermarket.
    >>
    >>After the experience I had with the Egg Bowties last month, I was less
    >>surprised when I could not find Farfel, either when I looked for it
    >>today. Finally I found weird little cellophane packages with Egg
    >>Barley, one from Streit's and one from an Israeli company.

    >
    >
    > None of the Jewish food purveyers (Streit's, Goodman's, Manichewitz,
    > etc.) label egg barley as farfel.... farfel (matzo farfel) is matzo
    > bits, egg barley is an egg noodle product. Only the most ignorant
    > hillybilly jews call egg barley farfel, they call all things that are
    > little bits farfel, like their brains are one farfel.... and so I'm
    > being quite generous because one farfel is a 1/4 bubke.
    >
    > Generally you will find a broader range of Jewish food products only
    > just prior to the high holidays, and they cost substantially less then,
    > that's when to stock up. That's when Jews eat these foods, because
    > they are somehow required... which is why they actually resent these
    > foods and don't typically eat them the rest of the year.... for
    > example, matzo is symbolic of a very unsavory ordeal, most Jews don't
    > eat matzo except during Passover (no such thing as wishing a Jew a
    > "Happy Passover", that's an insult... it's "Good Passover"). Wishing a
    > Jew a "Happy Passover" is ten times more offensive than wishing a Roman
    > Cathelic a "Happy Crucifixtion".
    >

    The only Passover greeting I can remember from "way back" is "I wish
    you a sweet Passover", einen suessen Pessach. It was the same for
    Rosh Hashanah, when we wished others A Sweet Year, ein suesses Jahr.
    For both holidays we ate a bit of honey as part of the festive dinner,
    to ensure that there would be sweetness to start us off. :eek:)
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>,
    Margaret Suran <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>Paraphrasing The Second Avenue Deli's recipe from their cookbook:
    > >>
    > >>Farfel and Mushrooms

    > >
    > > (recipe snipped)
    > > I can only surmise how delicious it would be if I'd had the farfel and
    > > didn't need to substitute orzo pasta. Pics and details are on my
    > > website. <I blush for embarrass>

    >
    > Farfel used to be sold in little boxes, just as the rest of the
    > noodles, in the kosher section of every supermarket.
    >
    > After the experience I had with the Egg Bowties last month, I was less
    > surprised when I could not find Farfel, either when I looked for it
    > today. Finally I found weird little cellophane packages with Egg
    > Barley, one from Streit's and one from an Israeli company.
    >
    > Orzo is nothing like Farfel, who are tiny pieces of egg noodles, baked
    > or dried and are like tiny Fleckerln. No self respecting Farfel would
    > ever try to look like a grain of rice.


    I'm sure it would not, but I had to make do with what I had available.
    Improv. The onions and mushrooms were already browned. The broth was
    at the ready.
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-8-05, My Farfel-less
    Farfel with Mushrooms. Jeez!
     
  17. The Bubbo

    The Bubbo Guest

    aem wrote:
    >
    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >> You might also enjoy this recipe for a side.
    >>
    >> Rice Pilaf
    >> [snip]
    >> NOTES : [email protected], 2/15/97, posted to r.f.cooking: :This recipe
    >> came from my 4th grade teacher's mother, a lovely Armenian
    >> woman, nearly 50 years ago! I wouldn't make pilaf any other way....and
    >> it always gets raves. Elizabeth Dean Brooks, rec.food.cooking"
    >> [snip]

    >
    > I make this exact dish, ever since learning it from my next door
    > neighbor, who was Armenian. Now if only I could make those two-layer
    > meatballs (kufta)... -aem
    >


    oh! I had egyptian kufta (similar to the armenian) in october at a ramadan
    dinner. They were delightful and I've been promised a cooking lesson!

    --
    ..:Heather:.
    www.velvet-c.com
     
  18. aem

    aem Guest

    The Bubbo wrote:
    >
    > oh! I had egyptian kufta (similar to the armenian) in october at a ramadan
    > dinner. They were delightful and I've been promised a cooking lesson!
    >

    That could be great fun. Don't pass up the chance. At holidays my
    neighbor's extended family would come and the kitchen would be full of
    Armenian women and they were BUSY all day! Eventually the table would
    be full of delightful things. The kufta were a specially spiced ground
    meat ball around which was an outer layer of a different ground meat,
    differently spiced. Subtle, complex, enchanting. No way were they
    going to let me in on their secrets. Since then, I've found that there
    are many, many varieties of meatballs in Armenian cooking, all called
    kufta, so I'll never really know how this particular family made them.
    Oh well, it's a good memory. -aem
     
  19. The Bubbo

    The Bubbo Guest

    aem wrote:
    >
    > The Bubbo wrote:
    >>
    >> oh! I had egyptian kufta (similar to the armenian) in october at a ramadan
    >> dinner. They were delightful and I've been promised a cooking lesson!
    >>

    > That could be great fun. Don't pass up the chance. At holidays my
    > neighbor's extended family would come and the kitchen would be full of
    > Armenian women and they were BUSY all day! Eventually the table would
    > be full of delightful things. The kufta were a specially spiced ground
    > meat ball around which was an outer layer of a different ground meat,
    > differently spiced. Subtle, complex, enchanting. No way were they
    > going to let me in on their secrets. Since then, I've found that there
    > are many, many varieties of meatballs in Armenian cooking, all called
    > kufta, so I'll never really know how this particular family made them.
    > Oh well, it's a good memory. -aem
    >


    My friend Jessi is married to an Eguptian dude. She gets invited to all these
    big cooking get togethers and the old Muslim women (mostly Egyptian in this
    case, but from lots of other places as well) go crazy trying to teach the
    american girl how to cook things. In turn, Jessi has taught me a few things as
    well.

    The Egyptian kufta were long and narrow and cooked on a skewer. I met the cook
    who made them for the buffet and apparently he is well known in his circle for
    his kufta, his eggplant something or other with tomato and garlic, and
    something else that I don't remember but happily ate.

    --
    ..:Heather:.
    www.velvet-c.com
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>,
    The Bubbo <[email protected]> wrote:

    > aem wrote:
    > >
    > > The Bubbo wrote:
    > >>
    > >> oh! I had egyptian kufta (similar to the armenian) in october at a ramadan
    > >> dinner. They were delightful and I've been promised a cooking lesson!
    > >>

    > > That could be great fun. Don't pass up the chance. At holidays my
    > > neighbor's extended family would come and the kitchen would be full of
    > > Armenian women and they were BUSY all day! Eventually the table would
    > > be full of delightful things. The kufta were a specially spiced ground
    > > meat ball around which was an outer layer of a different ground meat,
    > > differently spiced. Subtle, complex, enchanting. No way were they
    > > going to let me in on their secrets. Since then, I've found that there
    > > are many, many varieties of meatballs in Armenian cooking, all called
    > > kufta, so I'll never really know how this particular family made them.
    > > Oh well, it's a good memory. -aem
    > >

    >
    > My friend Jessi is married to an Eguptian dude. She gets invited to all these
    > big cooking get togethers and the old Muslim women (mostly Egyptian in this
    > case, but from lots of other places as well) go crazy trying to teach the
    > american girl how to cook things. In turn, Jessi has taught me a few things as
    > well.
    >
    > The Egyptian kufta were long and narrow and cooked on a skewer. I met the cook
    > who made them for the buffet and apparently he is well known in his circle for
    > his kufta, his eggplant something or other with tomato and garlic, and
    > something else that I don't remember but happily ate.


    Ever been to Holy Land deli/restaurant/grocery store on Lowry & Central
    NE? One gyro platter serves 2 easily.
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-8-05, My Farfel-less
    Farfel with Mushrooms. Jeez!
     
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