fast commuter- paniers on carbon



yogie

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Jul 2, 2006
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Hi

I am getting another bike from a flatbar Giant CRX to an OCR or TCR to increase my speed. I like to use panniers as I find it more comfortable than having back-pack on when I commute. I also like to get a carbon bike for comfort.

There are pannier racks that can clam onto the pole below the seat. The problem is that I have is that you cannot clam onto carbon pole as it will destroy it. A smart bike saleman suggested that I change the pole to an aluminium one so that it would work. Do you think there will be any problems as the aluminum pole will then be on the carbon frame? Seemed to be Ok the other way around where the carbon poles are put in bikes with aluminum frames (eg OCR 2)?
 

mysrh

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Apr 2, 2006
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Hi Yogie, just want to say, I've sent message to you. BTW, you live so close to where I live :p
 

gclark8

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Apr 13, 2004
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You may void the warranty by clamping anything to carbon frames, check the owners manual first. My advice, if it does not have the mounts drilled and tapped, don't fit it.
 

thomas_cho

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Jan 4, 2005
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yogie said:
Hi

I am getting another bike from a flatbar Giant CRX to an OCR or TCR to increase my speed. I like to use panniers as I find it more comfortable than having back-pack on when I commute. I also like to get a carbon bike for comfort.

There are pannier racks that can clam onto the pole below the seat. The problem is that I have is that you cannot clam onto carbon pole as it will destroy it. A smart bike saleman suggested that I change the pole to an aluminium one so that it would work. Do you think there will be any problems as the aluminum pole will then be on the carbon frame? Seemed to be Ok the other way around where the carbon poles are put in bikes with aluminum frames (eg OCR 2)?

I am not sure if the move from a CRX to a OCR would constitute a faster bike. Aren't they both based on the same geometry?

The TCR would have a more racey geometry, shorter wheelbase and is probably a lighter frame compared to the OCR.

What do you think makes the CRX slower than the OCR? Weight? Tyres?
 

mikesbytes

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Apr 12, 2006
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Don't do it. If the bike does not have the eyelits at the axil for mounting a carrier, then it is not designed to support a carrier. Also the handling of the bike may not be suitable for having weight at the back.

My OCR2 has the eyelits to support a carrier and I beleive it would do what you want. The difference in the weight between an Alimumim frame and a carbon frame is not sufficient enough to affect commuting. Spend the money you save on good shoes.

If weight is really that important, then don't take your junk to/from work. Shirts/Suits can be drycleaned locally, shoes left under the desk etc etc.
 

cluster blaster

New Member
Dec 4, 2005
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yogie said:
Hi

I am getting another bike from a flatbar Giant CRX to an OCR or TCR to increase my speed. I like to use panniers as I find it more comfortable than having back-pack on when I commute. I also like to get a carbon bike for comfort.

There are pannier racks that can clam onto the pole below the seat. The problem is that I have is that you cannot clam onto carbon pole as it will destroy it. A smart bike saleman suggested that I change the pole to an aluminium one so that it would work. Do you think there will be any problems as the aluminum pole will then be on the carbon frame? Seemed to be Ok the other way around where the carbon poles are put in bikes with aluminum frames (eg OCR 2)?
Keep the flat-bar CRX for commuting with those panniers on. To "increase speed", pedal harder. Google-out some simple training program, stick to it and you will be faster. I'd put a good clipless pedals on it, and bought some nice shoes. Good tyres help too.

Now, after having done that, if you still feel the NEED to buy a drop-bar racer, then stand in front of a mirror and acknowledge to yourself, that you are hooked to cycling and you WANT (as opposed to NEED) another bike. Then just go out there and get the TCR - provided the geometry fits you. Forget about the clamp-on rack, because:
1. It will slow you down. You wanted to go faster, remember..
2. It won't look good.
2. The bike will handle funny - TCR's are true racing bikes, and as such have short wheel base. Anything hanging out there will compromise the handling
3. You can bring all the stuff to work on Monday on your "slow" flat-bar bike and then just commute naked on your flashy TCR.

Just be careful when using shared cyclepaths - do not assume that just because you bought a racing bike that everyone will give way for the champion. Take it easy and enjoy the ride. Smile.
 

Jeytown

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Apr 26, 2006
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panniers on a racing bike ?????????????

i have panniers on my mtb and i think that it is their place in teh univers on a commuter

placing anything on a carbon frame other than drink holders that are also carbon is like placing a towbar on a ferrari

trust me you dont need the unwanted laughter
 

robalert

New Member
Jun 8, 2005
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Jeytown said:
panniers on a racing bike ?????????????

i have panniers on my mtb and i think that it is their place in teh univers on a commuter

placing anything on a carbon frame other than drink holders that are also carbon is like placing a towbar on a ferrari

trust me you dont need the unwanted laughter
i don't even really like panniers on my CRX... :)

i prefer to pannier up my old mtb
 

yogie

New Member
Jul 2, 2006
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mikesbytes said:
Don't do it. If the bike does not have the eyelits at the axil for mounting a carrier, then it is not designed to support a carrier. Also the handling of the bike may not be suitable for having weight at the back.

My OCR2 has the eyelits to support a carrier and I beleive it would do what you want. The difference in the weight between an Alimumim frame and a carbon frame is not sufficient enough to affect commuting. Spend the money you save on good shoes.

If weight is really that important, then don't take your junk to/from work. Shirts/Suits can be drycleaned locally, shoes left under the desk etc etc.

I agree with you that the handling of the bike may be effected negatively. However it may not be significant and I do not intend to put a large weight on the paniers. I thought the LBS idea of removing the carbon seat posts and putting alloy ones to be a novel idea and involved a lot of lateral thinking.

I agree with you the OCR 2 is a fine bike and I was thinking about it. It has eyelits on the back of the frame. However the gear set for the OCR 2 is a triple crank gear and I was hoping to get a Shimano 105 gearset which I heard was very good. I am not so sure why Giant is not catering for the commuter to wants to get there fast as possible and if paniers and with the 105 gearset.

In relation to the weight. The weight is not important, but the comfort from riding a carbon is.
 

mikesbytes

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Apr 12, 2006
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yogie said:
I agree with you that the handling of the bike may be effected negatively. However it may not be significant and I do not intend to put a large weight on the paniers. I thought the LBS idea of removing the carbon seat posts and putting alloy ones to be a novel idea and involved a lot of lateral thinking.

I agree with you the OCR 2 is a fine bike and I was thinking about it. It has eyelits on the back of the frame. However the gear set for the OCR 2 is a triple crank gear and I was hoping to get a Shimano 105 gearset which I heard was very good. I am not so sure why Giant is not catering for the commuter to wants to get there fast as possible and if paniers and with the 105 gearset.

In relation to the weight. The weight is not important, but the comfort from riding a carbon is.
Funny you should metion it, but I've worn out the cogs that came origionally with the bike and now have 105 cogs, but I also should mention that I use my OCR2 for training.

It sounds like you want medium quality parts on a commuter frame. Do you live in Sydney? try cellbikes. Otherwise talk to a couple of LBS's and find a bike that has medium quality components on a frame that is designed to support a carrier. I think that Cannodale may have a touring model that has those components.

Althernatively, loose 5kg of fat, buy carbon soled shoes, look/spd-sl (not spd)/speedplay road pedals, mitchen pro race 2/conti 4000 tyres, light inner tubes and lower the handle bars on your existing bike.
 

artemidorus

New Member
Mar 10, 2004
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yogie said:
Hi

I am getting another bike from a flatbar Giant CRX to an OCR or TCR to increase my speed. I like to use panniers as I find it more comfortable than having back-pack on when I commute. I also like to get a carbon bike for comfort.

There are pannier racks that can clam onto the pole below the seat. The problem is that I have is that you cannot clam onto carbon pole as it will destroy it. A smart bike saleman suggested that I change the pole to an aluminium one so that it would work. Do you think there will be any problems as the aluminum pole will then be on the carbon frame? Seemed to be Ok the other way around where the carbon poles are put in bikes with aluminum frames (eg OCR 2)?
Do not buy composite for comfort; you'll be disappointed, particularly if you get a bike with the bars too low. My 58.5cm TCR2 has the bars as high as possible and they are still ~8cm lower than my seat. It's my favourite commute, but it's not everyone's cup of tea.
A TCR would be hopeless with panniers; unstable due to the short wheelbase and your heels would hit the bags, as the stays are very short. You can't put much on a rack hanging off the post, anyway.
Why pay for an ultra-light bike if you are going to load it up?
Put pannier racks and good 25 or 28mm tyres on your CRX and enjoy, unless the bike is not the right size. TCRs just aren't designed for loading or comfort. OCRs are, but you could convert your CRX to an OCR with the simple addition of drop bars, STI shifters, new cables and guides and bar tape bought cheaply on e-bay or through probikekit or equivalent. You might need to change your stem or you might not.
Just don't do it; save your money for cycling consumables.
 

thomas_cho

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Jan 4, 2005
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artemidorus said:
Do not buy composite for comfort; you'll be disappointed, particularly if you get a bike with the bars too low. My 58.5cm TCR2 has the bars as high as possible and they are still ~8cm lower than my seat. It's my favourite commute, but it's not everyone's cup of tea.
A TCR would be hopeless with panniers; unstable due to the short wheelbase and your heels would hit the bags, as the stays are very short. You can't put much on a rack hanging off the post, anyway.
Why pay for an ultra-light bike if you are going to load it up?
Put pannier racks and good 25 or 28mm tyres on your CRX and enjoy, unless the bike is not the right size. TCRs just aren't designed for loading or comfort. OCRs are, but you could convert your CRX to an OCR with the simple addition of drop bars, STI shifters, new cables and guides and bar tape bought cheaply on e-bay or through probikekit or equivalent. You might need to change your stem or you might not.
Just don't do it; save your money for cycling consumables.

Conversions are not cheap, nor cost effective. By the time you are finished, you are better off getting another bike.

I'd say keep your CRX for commuting, AND get a race bike for the weekend rides. Who says you cant have 2 bikes or more?
 

cluster blaster

New Member
Dec 4, 2005
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yogie said:
I agree with you that the handling of the bike may be effected negatively. However it may not be significant and I do not intend to put a large weight on the paniers. I thought the LBS idea of removing the carbon seat posts and putting alloy ones to be a novel idea and involved a lot of lateral thinking.
Might be a good idea to test the lateral thinking of the LBS owner: ask if you can test-ride the TCR with that alloy seat post and loaded panniers... If you see his jaw sinking you'll know it was not such a good idea after all...
 

artemidorus

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Mar 10, 2004
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thomas_cho said:
Conversions are not cheap, nor cost effective. By the time you are finished, you are better off getting another bike.

I'd say keep your CRX for commuting, AND get a race bike for the weekend rides. Who says you cant have 2 bikes or more?
Thomas, not necessarily true. Shifters, $200 maximum (I got DA 9spd for $200 last year on e-bay, one could probably do better). Drop bar, $30-50. Stem, $10-40. Tape $10-20. New cables/guides, I'm guessing $20-30. As low as <$260, depending on patience. What's a carbon OCR worth?
 

gclark8

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Apr 13, 2004
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Do you get the feeling that Yogi is winding us up? Maybe even taking the ****?? :rolleyes:
 

mikesbytes

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Apr 12, 2006
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gclark8 said:
Do you get the feeling that Yogi is winding us up? Maybe even taking the ****?? :rolleyes:
Pehaps he only wanted his idea validated and wasn't interested in the alternatives suggested.
 

yogie

New Member
Jul 2, 2006
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thomas_cho said:
Conversions are not cheap, nor cost effective. By the time you are finished, you are better off getting another bike.

I'd say keep your CRX for commuting, AND get a race bike for the weekend rides. Who says you cant have 2 bikes or more?

Thanks for all the input. I've decided to get a composite and ride it to work without a bag or a small backpack (ie no paniers). With enough planning you can bring the stuff you need by car for work for the next few days and then commute by bike the following days, and have recovery days in between. It is much more aero-dynamic without paniers (however less convenient) and in Perth with the Fremantle Doctor wind aero-dynamics can be a big factor on certain days.

... who said getting more than 1 bike is illegal- aren't adults allowed to have toys?