fast forward seat posts for tris

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by cannonman, Jan 25, 2005.

  1. cannonman

    cannonman New Member

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    hey im building a bike for triathlons and im lookin for some advice. Im 5' 10" and ride a 56cm frame. Im interested in knowing if a forward angled seat post (profile fast forward) would improve my position enough to be in the right position for a tri set up in order to save my lags for the run. Thanks
     
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  2. e_guevara

    e_guevara New Member

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    Works for a lot guys who don't want to blow off a chunk off their budget on a tri bike. If you're really serious about tri's, consider a tri-specific bike (read: Cannondale Ironman :D)

    This thread might be useful http://www.cyclingforums.com/t206418-.html
     
  3. stang106

    stang106 New Member

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    Cannonman, this is what I have figured for myself: At 40 and have over 30 triathlons and two Ironmans I have come to the conclusion that the best possible position is one thats comfortable. I am aiming for a 1030 Ironman this spring and Need the best possible compromise between aero and comfort. More aero means less power, often to the point where the aero position is slower. You will need to do a ton of research to dial in your position. It is also harder to drink,eat and digest the lower you are. I made the mistake last year thinking I could get a better time in a lower position and after getting a repeated sore lower back My chiropractor figured out I was overextending my hamstrings. A good position will show a double 90 degree angle- ankle-hip-torso (pedal down) and forearm-torso. This is true for the hoods as well. I will be doing at least 10-12 180 km rides to tune in my position, I will also need to figure out caloric demands and what is absorbed well, hydration, soodium and potassium replacement, and brick the runs to get a feel of how well I come off and make the transition. If I am not comfortable on the bike how the heck am I going to run a 3:45 or so marathon? I'm just an average athlete and the littlest detail can make a huge difference i n time. Try different positons and don't go by what works for anyone else as they are different than you. Keep notes of different setups. borrow seatposts and stems. Start with hanging a plumb from your knee joint and get your saddle for/aft to string the pedal axle. Then get the two nineties. After a bunch of ride like that move your sadddle ahead 2 cm at atime and you will instantly feel if it feels better or worse and also do your own time trial with each setup. I could feel what works and what doesn't but I still felt I was never dialed in. New bike this season so I get to start over. Let us know how you make out. Go for comfort.

    Dave
     
  4. cannonman

    cannonman New Member

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    Thanks a bunch for the tips on getting started ill take your advice into consideration
     
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