Fasting level 2.6 what does this mean?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Mike Mansfield, Mar 1, 2004.

  1. Blood test results showed a fasting insulin level of 2.6, the reference should be 6.0-27.0. Is this
    low level of insulin an unhealthy condition? My fasting blood glucose was 100, cholesterol and other
    test were okay. Age 54, not overweight.

    Advice and comments appreciated.

    Mike
     
    Tags:


  2. Mike Collins

    Mike Collins Guest

    Mike Mansfield wrote:
    > Blood test results showed a fasting insulin level of 2.6, the reference should be 6.0-27.0. Is
    > this low level of insulin an unhealthy condition? My fasting blood glucose was 100, cholesterol
    > and other test were okay. Age 54, not overweight.
    >
    > Advice and comments appreciated.
    >
    > Mike
    Your insulin levels are meaningless without units.

    --
    Mike Collins UK Mike&heather-at-oakwellmount-dot-freeserve-dot-co-dot-uk
     
  3. Oldal4865

    Oldal4865 Guest

    Mike Mansfield wrote in message <7c6fe1c6.[email protected]>...
    >Blood test results showed a fasting insulin level of 2.6, the reference should be 6.0-27.0. Is this
    >low level of insulin an unhealthy condition? My fasting blood glucose was 100, cholesterol and
    >other test were okay. Age 54, not overweight.
    >
    > Advice and comments appreciated.
    >
    > Mike

    Well, we're not endocrinologists or even doctors.

    However, your HOMA score looks pretty normal (i.e. Not Insulin Resistant) from here.

    2.6 x 100/22.5 = 11.6

    (if that insulin value was 2.6 micro-International Units/Liter)

    Most/Many (?) Type 2 diabetics in the U.S. become Insulin Resistant years before developing the
    symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes. Therefore, it's a good thing "not to be Insulin Resistant" at your age)

    "HOMEOSTASIS MODEL ASSESSMENT (HOMA) AS A CLINICAL INDEX FOR INSULIN RESISTANCE IN PATIENTS WITH
    TYPE 2 DIABETES IN COMPARISON TO THE EUGLYCAEMIC CLAMP
    T. Wiesner, M. Blüher, R. Paschke III Medical Department, University of Leipzig, Germany Insulin
    resistance plays an important role in type 2 diabetes. The gold standard for the in vivo
    measurement of insulin resistance is the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique. However,
    this technique is time-consumig, expensive and not suitable for epidemiologic studies. The
    Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) was developed as a simple and inexpensive alternative to the
    more complex clamp technique. . . .(snip)./ . .For our insulin assay (MEIA, ABBOTT) we
    calculated a HOMA of >20 as insulin resistant (optimized by receiver operating characteristics
    (ROC)). The specificity of the model is 89.9% and the sensitivity 84.4% for our patients. The
    mean HOMA value was
    80.17 ± 56 for individuals with insulin resistance and 14.82 ± 9.26 for insulin sensitive probands
    (p = 0.01), respectively, as determined by the clamp technique. In conclusion, our data therefore
    suggest, that the HOMA is a suitable and simple method to reliably assess the degree of insulin
    resistance in epidemiological studies. . ."

    However, on the other hand, your fasting blood glucose (FbG) is a bit high for a non-diabetic, and
    your fasting insulin is a bit low. That might be a symptom of approaching Adult-onset Type 1
    diabetes. You are about the right body build, and right age for adult-onset Type 1 so you might want
    to keep an eye on your FbG for the next few years.

    If you know any diabetics who test their blood sugars at home (i.e. "smart" diabetics), you might be
    able to arrange to borrow their kit now and then. Otherwise, the Wal-Mart Relion meter and blood
    glucose testing strips are about the cheapest on the market and, I think, the strips have a very
    long shelf life.

    If you run across any announcements by folks offering free diabetes blood tests (look hard in the
    newspaper in March and Nov when this happens a lot), then for certain, run down and get one.

    Regards
    Old Al
     
  4. Annette

    Annette Guest

    "oldal4865" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Mike Mansfield wrote in message <[email protected]>...
    > >Blood test results showed a fasting insulin level of 2.6, the reference should be 6.0-27.0. Is
    > >this low level of insulin an unhealthy
    condition?
    > > My fasting blood glucose was 100, cholesterol and other test were okay. Age 54, not overweight.
    > >
    > > Advice and comments appreciated.
    > >
    > > Mike
    >
    > Well, we're not endocrinologists or even doctors.
    >
    > However, your HOMA score looks pretty normal (i.e. Not Insulin
    Resistant)
    > from here.
    >
    > 2.6 x 100/22.5 = 11.6
    >
    > (if that insulin value was 2.6 micro-International Units/Liter)
    >
    > Most/Many (?) Type 2 diabetics in the U.S. become Insulin Resistant years before developing the
    > symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes. Therefore, it's a
    good
    > thing "not to be Insulin Resistant" at your age)
    >
    > "HOMEOSTASIS MODEL ASSESSMENT (HOMA) AS A CLINICAL INDEX FOR INSULIN RESISTANCE IN PATIENTS WITH
    > TYPE 2 DIABETES IN COMPARISON TO THE
    EUGLYCAEMIC
    > CLAMP
    > T. Wiesner, M. Blüher, R. Paschke III Medical Department, University of Leipzig, Germany Insulin
    > resistance plays an important role in type 2 diabetes. The gold standard for the in vivo
    > measurement of insulin resistance is the
    euglycemic
    > hyperinsulinemic clamp technique. However, this technique is
    time-consumig,
    > expensive and not suitable for epidemiologic studies. The Homeostasis
    model
    > assessment (HOMA) was developed as a simple and inexpensive alternative to the more complex clamp
    > technique. . . .(snip)./ . .For our insulin assay (MEIA, ABBOTT) we calculated a HOMA of >20 as
    > insulin resistant (optimized by receiver operating characteristics (ROC)). The specificity of the
    > model is 89.9% and the sensitivity 84.4% for our patients. The mean HOMA value
    was
    > 80.17 ± 56 for individuals with insulin resistance and 14.82 ± 9.26 for insulin sensitive probands
    > (p = 0.01), respectively, as determined by the clamp technique. In conclusion, our data
    > therefore suggest, that the HOMA
    is
    > a suitable and simple method to reliably assess the degree of insulin resistance in
    > epidemiological studies. . ."
    >
    > However, on the other hand, your fasting blood glucose (FbG) is a bit high for a non-diabetic, and
    > your fasting insulin is a bit low. That might be a symptom of approaching Adult-onset Type 1
    > diabetes. You are about the right body build, and right age for adult-onset Type 1 so you might
    > want to keep an eye on your FbG for the next few years.
    >
    > If you know any diabetics who test their blood sugars at home (i.e. "smart" diabetics), you might
    > be able to arrange to borrow their kit now and then. Otherwise, the Wal-Mart Relion meter and
    > blood glucose
    testing
    > strips are about the cheapest on the market and, I think, the strips have
    a
    > very long shelf life.
    >
    > If you run across any announcements by folks offering free diabetes blood tests (look hard in the
    > newspaper in March and Nov when this happens a
    lot),
    > then for certain, run down and get one.
    >
    >
    > Regards
    > Old Al
    >

    Hi there Al,

    Where can I find out more about the HOMA method? Do you have a good link where I could read and
    understand a bit more about it?

    Thanks,

    Annette
     
  5. Oldal4865

    Oldal4865 Guest

    Annette wrote in message ...
    >
    >"oldal4865" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]ws.uni-
    >berlin.de...
    >>
    >> Mike Mansfield wrote in message
    . . . .(snip). . .

    >> > Advice and comments appreciated.
    >> >
    >> > Mike
    >>
    >> Well, we're not endocrinologists or even doctors.
    >>
    >> However, your HOMA score looks pretty normal (i.e. Not Insulin Resistant) from here.
    >>
    >> 2.6 x 100/22.5 = 11.6
    >>
    >> (if that insulin value was 2.6 micro-International Units/Liter)
    >>
    >> Most/Many (?) Type 2 diabetics in the U.S. become Insulin Resistant years before developing
    >> the symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes. Therefore, it's a good thing "not to be Insulin Resistant" at
    >> your age)
    >>
    . . .(snip). . .
    >>
    >> Regards
    >> Old Al
    >>
    >
    >Hi there Al,
    >
    >Where can I find out more about the HOMA method? Do you have a good link where I could read and
    >understand a bit more about it?
    >
    >Thanks,
    >
    >Annette
    >
    >

    Links? Yes. Good Links? Sorry, no.

    Looking for HOMA stuff is frustrating. This is all I have in my file and two of them are probably
    dead links. Also, no author that I have found so far really explains it, they are more interested in
    "using it" in a variety of confusing ways.

    However, I took a quick look at Google under HOMA insulin and it seems promising. I missed a lot of
    those cites the first time I went after HOMA references.

    http://www.medforum.nl/idm/vascular_dysfunction_precedes____.htm

    http://www.lef.org/newsarchive/disease/2001/04/13/eng-faxwatch/eng-faxwatch_
    220027_7230838797363709708.html

    http://www.easd.org/37th/Abs01/213.html

    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/reprint/23/4/449.pdf

    Note that the QUICKI method is functionally equivalent to the HOMA method. Both methods just
    multiply Fasting Insulin times Fasting Blood Glucose to produce the variable part of the Function.

    However, one of the frustrating aspects of this technque is that neither the HOMA or QUICKI method
    uses simple, straightforward mathematical functions. They made both of them more complicated for
    what I (as an engineer) see as no good reason at all, e.g. HOMA: why multiply insulin by glucose
    then divide by 22.5. . . .(22.5! What's that, the doc's apartment number?), or take the log of the
    inverse of the product in the QUICKI model. (Hey, not even engineers think in terms of the Logarithm
    of the Inverse Product, pH and pKa notwithstanding)

    http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/full/85/7/2402

    Also, one can calculate HOMA/QUICKI using micro-International Units/L, or pico-mols/Liter for the
    Insulin, and mg/dL or mmol/L for the bG. That gives you four different possible combinations and
    four different values for transition from normal to high Insulin Resistance.

    Getting doctors to agree is sorta like herding cats.

    Regards
    Old Al
     
  6. Annette

    Annette Guest

    Thank you.

    Annette

    "oldal4865" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    berlin.de...
    >
    > Annette wrote in message ...
    > >
    > >"oldal4865" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > >berlin.de...
    > >>
    > >> Mike Mansfield wrote in message
    > . . . .(snip). . .
    >
    > >> > Advice and comments appreciated.
    > >> >
    > >> > Mike
    > >>
    > >> Well, we're not endocrinologists or even doctors.
    > >>
    > >> However, your HOMA score looks pretty normal (i.e. Not Insulin Resistant) from here.
    > >>
    > >> 2.6 x 100/22.5 = 11.6
    > >>
    > >> (if that insulin value was 2.6 micro-International Units/Liter)
    > >>
    > >> Most/Many (?) Type 2 diabetics in the U.S. become Insulin Resistant
    years
    > >> before developing the symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes. Therefore, it's a good thing "not to be
    > >> Insulin Resistant" at your age)
    > >>
    > . . .(snip). . .
    > >>
    > >> Regards
    > >> Old Al
    > >>
    > >
    > >Hi there Al,
    > >
    > >Where can I find out more about the HOMA method? Do you have a good link where I could read and
    > >understand a bit more about it?
    > >
    > >Thanks,
    > >
    > >Annette
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Links? Yes. Good Links? Sorry, no.
    >
    > Looking for HOMA stuff is frustrating. This is all I have in my file and two of them are probably
    > dead links. Also, no author that I have found so far really explains it, they are
    more
    > interested in "using it" in a variety of confusing ways.
    >
    > However, I took a quick look at Google under HOMA insulin and it seems promising. I missed a lot
    > of those cites the first time I went after HOMA references.
    >
    > http://www.medforum.nl/idm/vascular_dysfunction_precedes____.htm
    >
    >
    >
    http://www.lef.org/newsarchive/disease/2001/04/13/eng-faxwatch/eng-faxwatch_
    > 220027_7230838797363709708.html
    >
    >
    > http://www.easd.org/37th/Abs01/213.html
    >
    > http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/reprint/23/4/449.pdf
    >
    > Note that the QUICKI method is functionally equivalent to the HOMA method. Both methods just
    > multiply Fasting Insulin times Fasting Blood Glucose to produce the variable part of the Function.
    >
    > However, one of the frustrating aspects of this technque is that neither the HOMA or QUICKI method
    > uses simple, straightforward mathematical functions. They made both of them more complicated for
    > what I (as an engineer) see as no good reason at all, e.g. HOMA: why multiply
    insulin
    > by glucose then divide by 22.5. . . .(22.5! What's that, the doc's apartment number?), or take the
    > log of the inverse of the product in the QUICKI model. (Hey, not even engineers think in terms of
    > the Logarithm
    of
    > the Inverse Product, pH and pKa notwithstanding)
    >
    > http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/full/85/7/2402
    >
    > Also, one can calculate HOMA/QUICKI using micro-International Units/L,
    or
    > pico-mols/Liter for the Insulin, and mg/dL or mmol/L for the bG. That gives you four different
    > possible combinations and four different values
    for
    > transition from normal to high Insulin Resistance.
    >
    > Getting doctors to agree is sorta like herding cats.
    >
    > Regards
    > Old Al
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  7. Annette

    Annette Guest

    Thank you.

    Annette

    "oldal4865" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    berlin.de...
    >
    > Annette wrote in message ...
    > >
    > >"oldal4865" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > >berlin.de...
    > >>
    > >> Mike Mansfield wrote in message
    > . . . .(snip). . .
    >
    > >> > Advice and comments appreciated.
    > >> >
    > >> > Mike
    > >>
    > >> Well, we're not endocrinologists or even doctors.
    > >>
    > >> However, your HOMA score looks pretty normal (i.e. Not Insulin Resistant) from here.
    > >>
    > >> 2.6 x 100/22.5 = 11.6
    > >>
    > >> (if that insulin value was 2.6 micro-International Units/Liter)
    > >>
    > >> Most/Many (?) Type 2 diabetics in the U.S. become Insulin Resistant
    years
    > >> before developing the symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes. Therefore, it's a good thing "not to be
    > >> Insulin Resistant" at your age)
    > >>
    > . . .(snip). . .
    > >>
    > >> Regards
    > >> Old Al
    > >>
    > >
    > >Hi there Al,
    > >
    > >Where can I find out more about the HOMA method? Do you have a good link where I could read and
    > >understand a bit more about it?
    > >
    > >Thanks,
    > >
    > >Annette
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Links? Yes. Good Links? Sorry, no.
    >
    > Looking for HOMA stuff is frustrating. This is all I have in my file and two of them are probably
    > dead links. Also, no author that I have found so far really explains it, they are
    more
    > interested in "using it" in a variety of confusing ways.
    >
    > However, I took a quick look at Google under HOMA insulin and it seems promising. I missed a lot
    > of those cites the first time I went after HOMA references.
    >
    > http://www.medforum.nl/idm/vascular_dysfunction_precedes____.htm
    >
    >
    >
    http://www.lef.org/newsarchive/disease/2001/04/13/eng-faxwatch/eng-faxwatch_
    > 220027_7230838797363709708.html
    >
    >
    > http://www.easd.org/37th/Abs01/213.html
    >
    > http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/reprint/23/4/449.pdf
    >
    > Note that the QUICKI method is functionally equivalent to the HOMA method. Both methods just
    > multiply Fasting Insulin times Fasting Blood Glucose to produce the variable part of the Function.
    >
    > However, one of the frustrating aspects of this technque is that neither the HOMA or QUICKI method
    > uses simple, straightforward mathematical functions. They made both of them more complicated for
    > what I (as an engineer) see as no good reason at all, e.g. HOMA: why multiply
    insulin
    > by glucose then divide by 22.5. . . .(22.5! What's that, the doc's apartment number?), or take the
    > log of the inverse of the product in the QUICKI model. (Hey, not even engineers think in terms of
    > the Logarithm
    of
    > the Inverse Product, pH and pKa notwithstanding)
    >
    > http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/full/85/7/2402
    >
    > Also, one can calculate HOMA/QUICKI using micro-International Units/L,
    or
    > pico-mols/Liter for the Insulin, and mg/dL or mmol/L for the bG. That gives you four different
    > possible combinations and four different values
    for
    > transition from normal to high Insulin Resistance.
    >
    > Getting doctors to agree is sorta like herding cats.
    >
    > Regards
    > Old Al
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
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