fat and blood sugar

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by anonymous, Feb 17, 2004.

  1. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Does fat have any effect on blood sugar level
     
    Tags:


  2. Mike V

    Mike V Guest

  3. markd

    markd Guest

    Indirectly, the metabolic syndrom which can lead to full blown diabetes, causes elevated blood
    glucose levels and is thought to be a disorder of fat metabolism. When consumed fat can slow the
    absorbtion of carbs and the resulting blood glucose level..

    >Does fat have any effect on blood sugar level
     
  4. Tcomeau

    Tcomeau Guest

    When first coined the term "metabolic syndrome" was directly linked to carbohydrate consumption,
    blood glusose levels, obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. There was no mention of dietary
    fats. Only research from industry groups try to lump dietary fat in as part of the problem.

    TC

    [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Indirectly, the metabolic syndrom which can lead to full blown diabetes, causes elevated blood
    > glucose levels and is thought to be a disorder of fat metabolism. When consumed fat can slow the
    > absorbtion of carbs and the resulting blood glucose level..
    >
    >
    > >Does fat have any effect on blood sugar level
     
  5. markd

    markd Guest

    It has been called a few things over time, syndrom now generally the accepted term. Dietary fat is
    not the issue, blood lipid profiles is, regardless of source of fats. High trigs, low hdl, and high
    ldl are a standard criteria for deciding on diagnosis; in addition to those you list. A disorder in
    fat metabolism in muscle tussue is the leading source in current thinking as where the insulin
    resisence starts, preceeded by a distorted blood lipid profile and higher then normal post meal and
    fasting blood glucose levels. It is all interraleted, no chicken and egg black and white "cause"
    here. Neither are evil "industry" groups at work, just the result of large population studies.

    >When first coined the term "metabolic syndrome" was directly linked to carbohydrate consumption,
    >blood glusose levels, obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. There was no mention of dietary
    >fats. Only research from industry groups try to lump dietary fat in as part of the problem.
    >
    >TC
    >
    >[email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected] et.com>...
    >> Indirectly, the metabolic syndrom which can lead to full blown diabetes, causes elevated blood
    >> glucose levels and is thought to be a disorder of fat metabolism. When consumed fat can slow the
    >> absorbtion of carbs and the resulting blood glucose level..
    >>
    >>
    >> >Does fat have any effect on blood sugar level
     
  6. Tcomeau

    Tcomeau Guest

    Some recent studies have shown that the so-called high-protein/high-fat diets improves blood lipid
    levels, therefore high-carb diets may be part of the cause of blood lipid problems. These results
    were totally opposite of the predicted results of a higher fat diet.

    Another study linked blood glucose levels directly to beta cell apoptosis in a "dose dependent
    manner". A high carb diets leads to high blood glucose levels which leads to b cell death which
    leads to insulin resistance.

    There is a direct link between refined carbs and obesity, syndrome x, insulin resistance
    and diabetes.

    TC

    [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > It has been called a few things over time, syndrom now generally the accepted term. Dietary fat is
    > not the issue, blood lipid profiles is, regardless of source of fats. High trigs, low hdl, and
    > high ldl are a standard criteria for deciding on diagnosis; in addition to those you list. A
    > disorder in fat metabolism in muscle tussue is the leading source in current thinking as where the
    > insulin resisence starts, preceeded by a distorted blood lipid profile and higher then normal post
    > meal and fasting blood glucose levels. It is all interraleted, no chicken and egg black and white
    > "cause" here. Neither are evil "industry" groups at work, just the result of large population
    > studies.
    >
    >
    > >When first coined the term "metabolic syndrome" was directly linked to carbohydrate consumption,
    > >blood glusose levels, obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. There was no mention of dietary
    > >fats. Only research from industry groups try to lump dietary fat in as part of the problem.
    > >
    > >TC
    > >
    > >[email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected] et.com>...
    > >> Indirectly, the metabolic syndrom which can lead to full blown diabetes, causes elevated blood
    > >> glucose levels and is thought to be a disorder of fat metabolism. When consumed fat can slow
    > >> the absorbtion of carbs and the resulting blood glucose level..
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> >Does fat have any effect on blood sugar level
     
  7. ddunfee

    ddunfee Guest

    My point is not a low carb/high carb one, it is that regardless of source that insulin resistence is
    now thought to be a disorder of fat metabolism at the celluar level. Without digging them out again,
    for those who are significantlly insulin resestent, especially diabetics, research shows that poly
    and mono saturated fats provide better results when trying to reverse the resistence. There is one
    strain of lab rats used in diabetic studies who are made diabetic by feeding them a high saturated
    fat diet, done so before the research project begins. As stated before, it is not a straight line
    cause and effect process, nor is reversing it, when it comes to the metabolic syndrome. It is a
    process with lots of feedback loops among all the metabolic connections of the body. Remember, this
    is not a low carb/high carb question, it is a question as to why fat metabolism disorder causes, as
    the final step, insulin resistence. Lipid profile, fat belly storage, blood glucose and pressure,
    weight, and exercise level are all the risk factors for it. Not all of the above are present for
    insulin resistence, there is a good number of diabetics who are the so called "lean" folk but have
    lipid and/or blood profiles to fit the pattern; not to mention that not all who fit the above get
    the syndrom which speaks of the genetic base to it all. It is not a one answer fits all possible
    questions problem.

    >Some recent studies have shown that the so-called high-protein/high-fat diets improves blood lipid
    >levels, therefore high-carb diets may be part of the cause of blood lipid problems. These results
    >were totally opposite of the predicted results of a higher fat diet.
    >
    >Another study linked blood glucose levels directly to beta cell apoptosis in a "dose dependent
    >manner". A high carb diets leads to high blood glucose levels which leads to b cell death which
    >leads to insulin resistance.
    >
    >There is a direct link between refined carbs and obesity, syndrome x, insulin resistance and
    >diabetes.
    >
    >TC
    >
    >[email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected] et.com>...
    >> It has been called a few things over time, syndrom now generally the accepted term. Dietary fat
    >> is not the issue, blood lipid profiles is, regardless of source of fats. High trigs, low hdl, and
    >> high ldl are a standard criteria for deciding on diagnosis; in addition to those you list. A
    >> disorder in fat metabolism in muscle tussue is the leading source in current thinking as where
    >> the insulin resisence starts, preceeded by a distorted blood lipid profile and higher then normal
    >> post meal and fasting blood glucose levels. It is all interraleted, no chicken and egg black and
    >> white "cause" here. Neither are evil "industry" groups at work, just the result of large
    >> population studies.
    >>
    >>
    >> >When first coined the term "metabolic syndrome" was directly linked to carbohydrate consumption,
    >> >blood glusose levels, obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. There was no mention of dietary
    >> >fats. Only research from industry groups try to lump dietary fat in as part of the problem.
    >> >
    >> >TC
    >> >
    >> >[email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]
    >y-n
    >> >et.com>...
    >> >> Indirectly, the metabolic syndrom which can lead to full blown diabetes, causes elevated blood
    >> >> glucose levels and is thought to be a disorder of fat metabolism. When consumed fat can slow
    >> >> the absorbtion of carbs and the resulting blood glucose level..
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >> >Does fat have any effect on blood sugar level
     
  8. >>Does fat have any effect on blood sugar level

    Haven't seen the beginning of this thread, but the answer AIUI is yes, a little.

    About 30% of the fat you eat gets converted into glucose, but it happens over roughly an 8-hour
    period, so the effect is very slight, normally.
    --
    Martin Thompson [email protected] (use "martin" not "bin") London, UK Home Page:
    http://www.tucana.demon.co.uk Web Shop: http://buy.at/tucana Mobile Phone Ring Tones:
    http://www.ringamoby.com

    "Everything I do and say with anyone makes a difference." Gita Bellin
     
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