Fat Guy *finally* biking - sorta...

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Albert N. Mouse, May 20, 2003.

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  1. Morning all...

    Thanks so much for all the help over the last couple weeks. Thanks to the many posts in both these
    groups (rec.bicycles.misc and alt.mountain-bike) I purchased a Specialized Hardrock bike for myself
    this past weekend.

    It's been roughly 14 years since I was last on two wheels, so I am a little shaky... I even took the
    first fall trying to traverse a small hill in the yard. :) Still have a *long* way to go (and the
    scratches/sprains ot prove
    it)!

    My only complaint is the saddle on the bike. I like the firmness, but it just seems a little to
    narrow (side-to-side) and perhaps a little too short (front-to-back) for my lardy behind... Are
    there any Clydes/Super-Clydes out there who have any saddles they'd advise to try? There are so many
    stinking choices, I need someplace to start lest I wear out he welcome of my local LBS.

    Most readers can stop here... But if you really wanna laugh, I'll post all the gory details below
    in a reply.

    Thanks, Nony Mouse
     
    Tags:


  2. Tacomaboy

    Tacomaboy Guest

    I am 230 and got the Specialized Milano.. 30-40 bucks and very cushy. Also consider getting some
    padded shorts, expensive but VERY helpful... no more sore arse for me... not at all!

    "Albert N. Mouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Morning all...
    >
    > Thanks so much for all the help over the last couple weeks. Thanks to the many posts in both these
    > groups (rec.bicycles.misc and alt.mountain-bike)
    I
    > purchased a Specialized Hardrock bike for myself this past weekend.
    >
    > It's been roughly 14 years since I was last on two wheels, so I am a
    little
    > shaky... I even took the first fall trying to traverse a small hill in the yard. :) Still have a
    > *long* way to go (and the scratches/sprains ot
    prove
    > it)!
    >
    > My only complaint is the saddle on the bike. I like the firmness, but it just seems a little to
    > narrow (side-to-side) and perhaps a little too
    short
    > (front-to-back) for my lardy behind... Are there any Clydes/Super-Clydes
    out
    > there who have any saddles they'd advise to try? There are so many
    stinking
    > choices, I need someplace to start lest I wear out he welcome of my local LBS.
    >
    > Most readers can stop here... But if you really wanna laugh, I'll post all the gory details below
    > in a reply.
    >
    > Thanks, Nony Mouse
     
  3. -------morestuff-------

    So we went to the LBS - the wife, kid and I first thing in the morning. He must've loved us as
    customers since we walked in knowing, or thinking we knew, what we wanted. Within 20 minutes we had
    fingered the bikes we wanted (even the wife got a new one) and had them setting them up.

    For me, I'm very uncomfortable on the bike right now... Aside from the saddle, which I think is
    poorly sized, there just the general yuckiness of sitting on a bike after so many years. I feel like
    I'm so high up, not coordinated enough to really keep steady, etc.

    When we got home, we decided to take the first spin... We loaded the kid on the wife's bike and had
    her spin around the yard just to get a feel for having the child seat on board. I waited patiently
    and then followed her out onto the road.

    The very first time I ever tried to shift a bike. I never had a multi-speed bike before. And what
    happens the first shift I ever make? That's right! The chain pops off the front sprocket and grinds
    along the frame. So much for the simplicity of it all. As my wife happily headed forth, I was
    waddling back to the house to call the LBS and ask them what to do.

    Chain re-seated, I set out again on my own after the wife got back. I'm thankful that we live inthe
    boonies since I would be dangerous on any *real* road. I'm unsteady and weave a fair bit on the
    shoulder... And turning is not my strong point, either.

    At that point, I decided to try my first shift... I guess I was really confused as to what shifting
    on a bike would be. I expected a nice smooth whir and instead met with a *clank* and my first fall.
    With the sound, I was sure something else had broken and that I was *going* to fall - so I just went
    ahead. After brushing off, I realized that everything looked like it was where it should be, so I
    got up and tried again. Sure enough, I think that's just what shifting sounds like. Also interesting
    is that there's a slight delay in shifting on the levers and actually hearing the shift down below.
    Fascinated, but more enlightened, I pedaled the few hundred yards back home.

    As I zinged across the road and back into my yard, I met with fall number 2, and the end of my first
    day of riding. Our front yard has a slight rise that I decided to ride up. I *severely*
    miscalculated the speed/gear/force that I'd need to get up and stalled. Stalling on a bike on an
    incline appears to be something for advanced bikers only and down I went. My left ankle planted
    awkwardly on the lower side of my body and buckled under my girth. From there a chain of events
    unfolded that sent me tumbling over backwards and dragging the inside of both legs along the pedal
    and causing much bleeding.

    To add more injury to injury, the frame then came down on top of my heap and clanked again my knee
    and the only-just-sprained ankle.

    And then I hear my 18 month old son laughing and saying 'Daddy dance'.

    *sigh*

    So.... we'll see how it goes tonight when we try it again.

    Thanks for letting me vent.

    Nony Mouse
     
  4. Tacomaboy

    Tacomaboy Guest

    Might want to lower your seat so you can reach the ground, until you develop better balance. That
    way if you come to a stop, you dont fall over. You don't have clips on your pedals, right?
    Otherwise, sounds like you are hitting the learning curve just about right. Shifitng is noisy and
    does take time, but keep at it. ALso remember to stick with the right brake lever... "Albert N.
    Mouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > -------morestuff-------
    >
    > So we went to the LBS - the wife, kid and I first thing in the morning.
    He
    > must've loved us as customers since we walked in knowing, or thinking we knew, what we wanted.
    > Within 20 minutes we had fingered the bikes we
    wanted
    > (even the wife got a new one) and had them setting them up.
    >
    > For me, I'm very uncomfortable on the bike right now... Aside from the saddle, which I think is
    > poorly sized, there just the general yuckiness of sitting on a bike after so many years. I feel
    > like I'm so high up, not coordinated enough to really keep steady, etc.
    >
    > When we got home, we decided to take the first spin... We loaded the kid
    on
    > the wife's bike and had her spin around the yard just to get a feel for having the child seat on
    > board. I waited patiently and then followed her out onto the road.
    >
    > The very first time I ever tried to shift a bike. I never had a
    multi-speed
    > bike before. And what happens the first shift I ever make? That's right! The chain pops off the
    > front sprocket and grinds along the frame. So much for the simplicity of it all. As my wife
    > happily headed forth, I was waddling back to the house to call the LBS and ask them what to do.
    >
    > Chain re-seated, I set out again on my own after the wife got back. I'm thankful that we live
    > inthe boonies since I would be dangerous on any
    *real*
    > road. I'm unsteady and weave a fair bit on the shoulder... And turning is not my strong
    > point, either.
    >
    > At that point, I decided to try my first shift... I guess I was really confused as to what
    > shifting on a bike would be. I expected a nice smooth whir and instead met with a *clank* and my
    > first fall. With the sound, I was sure something else had broken and that I was *going* to fall -
    > so I just went ahead. After brushing off, I realized that everything looked
    like
    > it was where it should be, so I got up and tried again. Sure enough, I think that's just what
    > shifting sounds like. Also interesting is that there's a slight delay in shifting on the levers
    > and actually hearing the shift down below. Fascinated, but more enlightened, I pedaled the few
    > hundred yards back home.
    >
    > As I zinged across the road and back into my yard, I met with fall number
    2,
    > and the end of my first day of riding. Our front yard has a slight rise that I decided to ride up.
    > I *severely* miscalculated the
    speed/gear/force
    > that I'd need to get up and stalled. Stalling on a bike on an incline appears to be something for
    > advanced bikers only and down I went. My left ankle planted awkwardly on the lower side of my body
    > and buckled under my girth. From there a chain of events unfolded that sent me tumbling over
    > backwards and dragging the inside of both legs along the pedal and causing much bleeding.
    >
    > To add more injury to injury, the frame then came down on top of my heap
    and
    > clanked again my knee and the only-just-sprained ankle.
    >
    > And then I hear my 18 month old son laughing and saying 'Daddy dance'.
    >
    > *sigh*
    >
    > So.... we'll see how it goes tonight when we try it again.
    >
    > Thanks for letting me vent.
    >
    > Nony Mouse
     
  5. Technician

    Technician Guest

  6. Tacomaboy

    Tacomaboy Guest

  7. Bob

    Bob Guest

    I hear this all the time, but have you ever tried to stop by using your rear brake only? Personally,
    I'm too heavy and the bike keeps going. I love the front brake and hit it all the time. Of course, I
    make sure my butt is behind the seat when I do it, but the front brake isn't as bad as people would
    have you believe.

    --
    Bob ctviggen at rcn dot com

    "TacomaBoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Yes you quickly learn to apprecaite the term "endo".
    >
    > "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:M[email protected]...
    > > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > > ALso remember to stick with the right brake lever...
    > >
    > > Yeah, but the learning curve is much faster when you grab a handful of left brake. ;-)
    > > --
    > > ~Travis
    > >
    > > travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  8. Tacomaboy

    Tacomaboy Guest

    With my old Cantilever Alivio brakes... I agree, I couldnt stop nearly well enough. But with My
    Deore V brakes, I can stop PLENTY fast, though occasionally, I will use some of the left brake, but
    very sparingly.

    "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:D[email protected]...
    > I hear this all the time, but have you ever tried to stop by using your
    rear
    > brake only? Personally, I'm too heavy and the bike keeps going. I love
    the
    > front brake and hit it all the time. Of course, I make sure my butt is behind the seat when I do
    > it, but the front brake isn't as bad as people would have you believe.
    >
    > --
    > Bob ctviggen at rcn dot com
    >
    > "TacomaBoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Yes you quickly learn to apprecaite the term "endo".
    > >
    > > "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > > > ALso remember to stick with the right brake lever...
    > > >
    > > > Yeah, but the learning curve is much faster when you grab a handful of left brake. ;-)
    > > > --
    > > > ~Travis
    > > >
    > > > travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
    > >
    > >
    >
     
  9. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > With my old Cantilever Alivio brakes... I agree, I couldnt stop nearly well enough. But with My
    > Deore V brakes, I can stop PLENTY fast, though occasionally, I will use some of the left brake,
    > but very sparingly.
    >

    I tend to use each equally, but with a bit more on the front as it tends to have more stopping
    power. stopping power can then be much smoother in transition. i always figure too much back
    and i skid, too much front and i endo, a nice blend of the two works perfect (as perfect as V
    brakes can be).
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  10. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Tue, 20 May 2003 10:55:34 -0400, Albert N. Mouse wrote:

    > The very first time I ever tried to shift a bike. I never had a multi-speed bike before. And what
    > happens the first shift I ever make? That's right! The chain pops off the front sprocket and
    > grinds along the frame. So much for the simplicity of it all. As my wife happily headed forth, I
    > was waddling back to the house to call the LBS and ask them what to do.

    Maybe the LBS didn't share with you: bikes don't shift well under load. Low-end bike components are
    particularly bad about this. What this means is, you want to be in the right gear BEFORE you start
    the hill, not trying to shift halfway up. This may be part of the problem.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  11. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Tue, 20 May 2003 17:45:07 GMT, Bob wrote:
    > I hear this all the time, but have you ever tried to stop by using your rear brake only?
    > Personally, I'm too heavy and the bike keeps going. I love the front brake and hit it all the
    > time. Of course, I make sure my butt is behind the seat when I do it, but the front brake isn't as
    > bad as people would have you believe.

    You're absolutely right, the rear brake alone does little more than cause skidding. The front wheel
    has all the weight when you're stopping, and the front brake (or "left brake" as someone is calling
    it, but this isn't a wheelchair!) is the one that actually WORKS. Think of it the rear brake as a
    little assist to the front brake.

    I've ridden several miles of technical trail with a broken rear brake without any issues. If I'd
    have broken the front brake, I'd have been looking for some easy route to hobble the bike home.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  12. Zilla

    Zilla Guest

    You need ABS on your left break - your hand/fingers. Try modulating the front brake -
    gripping/releasing in rapid successions.

    --
    - Zilla Cary, NC (Remove XSPAM)

    "TacomaBoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > With my old Cantilever Alivio brakes... I agree, I couldnt stop nearly
    well
    > enough. But with My Deore V brakes, I can stop PLENTY fast, though occasionally, I will use some
    > of the left brake, but very sparingly.
    >
    > "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:D[email protected]...
    > > I hear this all the time, but have you ever tried to stop by using your
    > rear
    > > brake only? Personally, I'm too heavy and the bike keeps going. I love
    > the
    > > front brake and hit it all the time. Of course, I make sure my butt is behind the seat when I do
    > > it, but the front brake isn't as bad as people would have you believe.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Bob ctviggen at rcn dot com
    > >
    > > "TacomaBoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Yes you quickly learn to apprecaite the term "endo".
    > > >
    > > > "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > > > > ALso remember to stick with the right brake lever...
    > > > >
    > > > > Yeah, but the learning curve is much faster when you grab a handful
    of
    > > > > left brake. ;-)
    > > > > --
    > > > > ~Travis
    > > > >
    > > > > travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
  13. Gyp

    Gyp Guest

    TacomaBoy wrote:
    > Yes you quickly learn to apprecaite the term "endo".

    I've always been cautous of using the front brake on decents but to be honest since its the front
    brake thats most useful for braking its a mistake to "ignore it". Last weekend my rear sidewall
    split and after making repairing the inner tube I had to go back to base for a new tyre (since I
    don't carry one as they never go wrong <Doh>!) and I had to release the rear v-brakes. It wasn't
    that bad with only the front disc brake..

    Gyp
     
  14. John Harlow

    John Harlow Guest

    > Most readers can stop here... But if you really wanna laugh, I'll post all the gory details below
    > in a reply.

    Nony,

    We've all been there; it takes a lot of trial and error (especially the error part). The great
    thing is, the more you ride the better you get - especially at first. It will gradually go from
    totally frustrating to totally fun. The only way you can lose is to have the bike end up rotting
    away in the garage.
     
  15. John Harlow wrote:
    > The great thing is, the more you ride the better you get - especially at first. It will gradually
    > go from totally frustrating to totally fun.

    Nony, Come with me and I'll show yout he "Barney loop" at Bear Brook S.P.

    All last Summer I used to run a weekly "novice ride" aka Into to Mountain Biking" There where I
    would go over the basics of proper braking and shifting and trail-riding in a VERY controlled
    and safe manner around this 1 very tame mile loop. (It was called Kong Dorko and his Army of
    Barney's ;-)

    You CAN do it, and I will be more than happy to help you. Send me a message and we'll set up a
    date/time. I'm working security @ night out at the ariport so my days are almost totally open.

    > The only way you can lose is to have the bike end up rotting away in the garage.

    I'll drink to that
     
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