Fatter tires on road/touring bike

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Sojourner, Jun 12, 2003.

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  1. Sojourner

    Sojourner Guest

    I have a Trek 470 ('bout 8 to 10 years old) that has been in storage for the last five years. I
    think its time it came out of the closet. >:D

    However, having moved from urbanized well-paved citydom to a rural area where they have never even
    heard of the term "berm" (and sometimes off the road is into a 30 foot ravine) I'm not planning on
    doing any road riding.

    However, there are dirt trails - nice, SMOOOOOTH, dirt trails - that I ought to be able to take my
    sorta-touring bike on - if I lose the road tires, which are probably dry-rotted by now anyway.

    So how wide can I go, say, 35, 38? The 470 was the cheap version of the
    520.

    I'm not into buying another bike partly due to poverty and partly because they just don't make
    anything that fits me (I'm 5'2" female with 31" inseam, means I need way short top tube cuz I'm so
    short waisted, this 470 has been finagled around to fit pretty well, I see no reason to start over
    with something new when I orter be able to make this work).

    Nashbar's got a "comfort road tire" in 700x35 and 700x38 that sounds like it might fit the bill
    (plus its cheap, like $13 apiece on sale). Can I use it? Any other suggestions?

    Thanks.

    Sojourner.
     
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  2. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Thu, 12 Jun 2003 07:10:51 -0500, Sojourner <[email protected]> from
    http://extra.newsguy.com wrote:

    >
    >Nashbar's got a "comfort road tire" in 700x35 and 700x38 that sounds like it might fit the bill
    >(plus its cheap, like $13 apiece on sale). Can I use it? Any other suggestions?

    Is there a bike shop near you? Take your bike in and see what they can recommend.
    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace a slowly listening salami kills a dismal
    wallpaper poem,
    7:37:43 PM 12 June 2003
     
  3. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Sojourner" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have a Trek 470 ('bout 8 to 10 years old) that has been in storage for the last five years. I
    > think its time it came out of the closet. >:D
    >
    > However, having moved from urbanized well-paved citydom to a rural area where they have never even
    > heard of the term "berm" (and sometimes off the road is into a 30 foot ravine) I'm not planning on
    > doing any road riding.
    >
    > However, there are dirt trails - nice, SMOOOOOTH, dirt trails - that I ought to be able to take my
    > sorta-touring bike on - if I lose the road tires, which are probably dry-rotted by now anyway.
    >
    > So how wide can I go, say, 35, 38? The 470 was the cheap version of the
    > 520.

    Consider cyclocross tires. Something like an Avocet Kevlar Cross II in a 700x32c would handle both
    the trails (even if they get a little muddy) and the road, should you find any you feel
    comfortable with.

    RichC
     
  4. B

    B Guest

    > Any other suggestions?

    Your brakes will determine how large a tire you can fit.

    B

    (remove clothes to reply)
     
  5. Sojourner <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    >>
    > So how wide can I go, say, 35, 38? The 470 was the cheap version of the
    > 520.
    >
    Are you sure about this? I thought the 420 was the cheap version of the 520. There IS a newer 470
    which is more "road" bike, as in narrow tires and little clearance. Some road bikes won't accept
    larger than 25's.

    You can see how much clearance there is between the tire and frame (seat tube, chainstays, fork),
    and also the brake arches (do you have cantilever brakes?).

    You can install the wheel with the tire deflated, then inflate it in place, as long as there's
    sufficient clearance once installed.

    www.sheldonbrown.com has articles on tire sizes and other topics. Marked sizes are not always
    accurate. I believe he has a table showing the range of tire sizes for a given rim size.

    OTTOMH the 520 comes with Top Touring 700*32. I suspect a 35 would fit, possibly a 38 without
    fenders. But it depends on the tire as well as the amount of clearance available.

    hth
     
  6. Sojourner

    Sojourner Guest

    Kevan Smith wrote:
    > On Thu, 12 Jun 2003 07:10:51 -0500, Sojourner <[email protected]> from
    > http://extra.newsguy.com wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Nashbar's got a "comfort road tire" in 700x35 and 700x38 that sounds like it might fit the bill
    >>(plus its cheap, like $13 apiece on sale). Can I use it? Any other suggestions?
    >
    >
    > Is there a bike shop near you? Take your bike in and see what they can recommend.

    They recommend buying a new $575 bike! LOL!
     
  7. Sojourner

    Sojourner Guest

    mark freedman wrote:
    > Sojourner <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > Are you sure about this? I thought the 420 was the cheap version of the 520. There IS a newer
    > 470 which is more "road" bike, as in narrow tires and little clearance. Some road bikes won't
    > accept larger than 25's.

    Nope, not sure - bought it almost ten years ago and haven't used it in five (unless I want to pack
    it in the car and drive almost 100 miles, there's nowhere really safe to ride it for any distance).
    It has fenders, it has a rack, it has a kickstand. It was definitely the cheap version of the 520. I
    would have been willing to buy the 520, but it didn't come with a top-tube near short enough for me.
    At the time, I had delusions of riding RAGBRAI some day...

    > You can see how much clearance there is between the tire and frame (seat tube, chainstays,
    > fork), and also the brake arches (do you have cantilever brakes?).

    Everything on it was standard as put on it by Trek, except the stem and brake handles and handlebars
    - I got a shorter stem to shorten the effective forward reach and the short-reach/small-hands Terry
    handles/handlebar. It made it ALMOST short enough for me. I managed most of the MS 150 on it after I
    shortened it up as much as I could. (Kids bikes don't work for me, my legs are long and standover
    height on a kids bike is too short). If "cantilever" brakes means normal real bike brakes, then
    that's what I have (not the kind that came on your Schwinn that you pedaled backwards to engage).
    You pull the brake handles and the cable pulls the brakes up to the rim. 'Zat cantilever?

    Oh yeah, and I put the clipless pedals on there too. Kickstand and fenders weren't standard either.

    > www.sheldonbrown.com has articles on tire sizes and other topics. Marked sizes are not always
    > accurate. I believe he has a table showing the range of tire sizes for a given rim size.

    OMGosh, he's still around? LOL! I'll have to go check it out.

    > OTTOMH the 520 comes with Top Touring 700*32. I suspect a 35 would fit, possibly a 38 without
    > fenders. But it depends on the tire as well as the amount of clearance available.

    Okey dokey, thanks for the help.
     
  8. Sojourner

    Sojourner Guest

    B wrote:
    >>Any other suggestions?
    >
    >
    > Your brakes will determine how large a tire you can fit.
    >
    > B
    >
    > (remove clothes to reply)

    I thought they would have to be just readjusted? Guess I'll have to get assertive and take the bike
    in anyway - in which case they'll want to sell me whatever $30 tires they have in stock, in addition
    to the service work.

    *sigh*

    Thanks.
     
  9. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "Sojourner" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > a kids bike is too short). If "cantilever" brakes means normal real bike brakes, then that's what
    > I have (not the kind that came on your Schwinn that you pedaled backwards to engage). You pull the
    > brake handles and the cable pulls the brakes up to the rim. 'Zat cantilever?

    Caliper Brakes (sometimes called Side Pull):
    http://www.nashbar.com/nashbar_photos/medium/SH-BR7700C.gif

    Cantilever Brakes: http://www.nashbar.com/nashbar_photos/medium/AO-SHCB.gif

    "V" Brakes (aka Linear Pull): http://www.nashbar.com/nashbar_photos/medium/AO-BRD7.gif

    There are also disc brakes: http://www.nashbar.com/nashbar_photos/medium/SH-MDB515.gif

    Hub brakes are cable-actuated brakes built into the wheel hub.

    "Coaster" brakes are rear hub brakes actuated by pedalling backwards.

    -Buck
     
  10. Sojourner

    Sojourner Guest

    Buck wrote:
    > "Sojourner" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    >>a kids bike is too short). If "cantilever" brakes means normal real bike brakes, then that's what
    >>I have (not the kind that came on your Schwinn that you pedaled backwards to engage). You pull the
    >>brake handles and the cable pulls the brakes up to the rim. 'Zat cantilever?
    >
    >
    > Caliper Brakes (sometimes called Side Pull):
    > http://www.nashbar.com/nashbar_photos/medium/SH-BR7700C.gif

    That's them.
     
  11. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "Sojourner" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Buck wrote:
    > > "Sojourner" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]spam...
    > >
    > >
    > >>a kids bike is too short). If "cantilever" brakes means normal real bike brakes, then that's
    > >>what I have (not the kind that came on your Schwinn that you pedaled backwards to engage). You
    > >>pull the brake handles and the cable pulls the brakes up to the rim. 'Zat cantilever?
    > >
    > >
    > > Caliper Brakes (sometimes called Side Pull):
    > > http://www.nashbar.com/nashbar_photos/medium/SH-BR7700C.gif
    >
    > That's them.

    Then that's likely to be the biggest limiting factor in tire size for you. Measure the space between
    the brake hardware and your current tire. Also measure the spaces between the tire and the
    chainstays, as well as the space between the tire and the chainstay bridge (if there is one).
    Basically, measure the distance between your tire and all hard parts. Get back to us with these
    distances and your current tire size and someone around here will be able to give you a ballpark
    size you can go up to. Keep in mind that much like clothing and shoes, the same size tire from
    different manufacturers can have very different dimensions.

    Come to think of it, maybe you should just take it to the shop. Hands-on is so much better
    sometimes.

    -Buck
     
  12. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Fri, 13 Jun 2003 22:22:50 -0500, Sojourner <[email protected]> from
    http://extra.newsguy.com wrote:

    >Kevan Smith wrote:
    >> On Thu, 12 Jun 2003 07:10:51 -0500, Sojourner <[email protected]> from
    >> http://extra.newsguy.com wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Nashbar's got a "comfort road tire" in 700x35 and 700x38 that sounds like it might fit the bill
    >>>(plus its cheap, like $13 apiece on sale). Can I use it? Any other suggestions?
    >>
    >>
    >> Is there a bike shop near you? Take your bike in and see what they can recommend.
    >
    >They recommend buying a new $575 bike! LOL!

    Well, there you go! Help the economy.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace YOW!!! I am having fun!!!
    4:25:55 PM 13 June 2003
     
  13. Sojourner

    Sojourner Guest

    Kevan Smith wrote:
    > On Fri, 13 Jun 2003 22:22:50 -0500, Sojourner <[email protected]> from
    > http://extra.newsguy.com wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Kevan Smith wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Thu, 12 Jun 2003 07:10:51 -0500, Sojourner <[email protected]> from
    >>>http://extra.newsguy.com wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Nashbar's got a "comfort road tire" in 700x35 and 700x38 that sounds like it might fit the bill
    >>>>(plus its cheap, like $13 apiece on sale). Can I use it? Any other suggestions?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Is there a bike shop near you? Take your bike in and see what they can recommend.
    >>
    >>They recommend buying a new $575 bike! LOL!
    >
    >
    > Well, there you go! Help the economy.

    Unfortunately, that is no help to MY economy - I was laid off two weeks ago. :D
     
  14. Sojourner

    Sojourner Guest

    Buck wrote:

    > Come to think of it, maybe you should just take it to the shop. Hands-on is so much better
    > sometimes.

    What can I say, I wanted to do it myself and save $40 or so - no job, you know.

    However, you are undoubtedly right. Thanks for the advice.
     
  15. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Sat, 14 Jun 2003 00:16:59 -0500, Sojourner <[email protected]> from
    http://extra.newsguy.com wrote:

    >Kevan Smith wrote:
    >> On Fri, 13 Jun 2003 22:22:50 -0500, Sojourner <[email protected]> from
    >> http://extra.newsguy.com wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Kevan Smith wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Thu, 12 Jun 2003 07:10:51 -0500, Sojourner <[email protected]> from
    >>>>http://extra.newsguy.com wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Nashbar's got a "comfort road tire" in 700x35 and 700x38 that sounds like it might fit the bill
    >>>>>(plus its cheap, like $13 apiece on sale). Can I use it? Any other suggestions?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Is there a bike shop near you? Take your bike in and see what they can recommend.
    >>>
    >>>They recommend buying a new $575 bike! LOL!
    >>
    >>
    >> Well, there you go! Help the economy.
    >
    >Unfortunately, that is no help to MY economy - I was laid off two weeks ago. :D

    new freedom to train yourself into the pro peloton!

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace I'll show you MY telex number if you show
    me YOURS ...
    2:08:00 AM 14 June 2003
     
  16. Sojourner

    Sojourner Guest

    Kevan Smith wrote:

    > new freedom to train yourself into the pro peloton!

    Unlikely, as (1) I don't have credit cards (credit cards are EVIL!)
    (2) I'm 44 and out of shape - on my best day ever I would not have been a racer. I'm the only
    cyclist I know who rides the brakes all the way DOWN the hills.... LOL! Speed an't my thang.

    Thanks anyway. Off to the shop I go (I guess) to see about slightly fatter tires...
     
  17. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Sat, 14 Jun 2003 23:49:08 -0500, Sojourner <[email protected]> from
    http://extra.newsguy.com wrote:

    >Thanks anyway. Off to the shop I go (I guess) to see about slightly fatter tires...

    You can have some of my 'spare tire'.

    Please. :)

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace FROZEN ENTREES may be flung by members of
    opposing SWANSON SECTS ...
    1:24:12 AM 15 June 2003
     
  18. "Sojourner" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > Buck wrote:
    >
    >> Come to think of it, maybe you should just take it to the shop. Hands-on is so much better
    >> sometimes.
    >
    > What can I say, I wanted to do it myself and save $40 or so - no job, you know.
    >
    > However, you are undoubtedly right. Thanks for the advice.

    Well, You probably can have your cake and eat it too. At my two closest bike shops, they don't
    have any problem if I bring them a bike to assess the type of tires that would fit. And if I want
    to install them myself and they don't fit, they are more than willing to exchange them for a size
    that would fit. Just explain your problem (as large as it fits) and the type of terrain you want
    to ride into and they might steer you towards adequate tire. Or maybe they already know which ones
    would be too big.

    Regards,

    Michel Gagnon
     
  19. Sojourner

    Sojourner Guest

    Kevan Smith wrote:
    > On Sat, 14 Jun 2003 23:49:08 -0500, Sojourner <[email protected]> from
    > http://extra.newsguy.com wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >>Thanks anyway. Off to the shop I go (I guess) to see about slightly fatter tires...
    >
    >
    > You can have some of my 'spare tire'.
    >
    > Please. :)

    Thanks. However, I have more than enough of that of my own... after five years off-bike, things are
    not looking good in that department. LOL!
     
  20. Sojourner

    Sojourner Guest

    Michel Gagnon wrote:

    > Well, You probably can have your cake and eat it too. At my two closest bike shops, they don't
    > have any problem if I bring them a bike to assess the type of tires that would fit. And if I want
    > to install them myself and they don't fit, they are more than willing to exchange them for a size
    > that would fit. Just explain your problem (as large as it fits) and the type of terrain you want
    > to ride into and they might steer you towards adequate tire. Or maybe they already know which ones
    > would be too big.

    I need to get it tuned up anyway after letting it sit for 5 years. So I guess I'll take it in for
    that, anyway, and ask "the other question" then.

    BTW, it IS a Trek 420 50 cm with 20.4" top tube length (I did dig that much info up). That top tube
    length (and I don't know if that is absolute or effective) was too long for me. Wish I'd bought a
    Terry instead, but I didn't know they existed back then when I had money and I could have afforded a
    Terry, not now, although they are making a hybrid I might be able to afford when I am working again.
    Of course by that time I might have fat tires and be used to the tricked out 420... On the other
    other hand, if I get the job I'm interviewing for, I'll be working "in town" again (90 miles from
    home) and might just want my road bike to be a road bike to ride in town on real bike paths.

    We'll see what the future brings.

    Thanks, everyone, for all the help and advice.

    Sojourner
     
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