Favorit Rapido

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Kirk, Jun 22, 2003.

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  1. Kirk

    Kirk Guest

    I got this bike for $40, at a garage sale, about 10 years ago. Anyone know anything about this brand
    of bike? It was made in Czechoslovakia, if that helps.

    Even though I've owned the bike for a decade, I started riding it seriously only a year or so ago.
    I guess this means I'm pretty new to riding.

    While I'm happy with the bike, I'm just wondering how it compares to others. I put on a new
    seat, new handlebar tape, a couple of bags, new pedals with the toe-strap thingies, and some
    other geegaws.

    I get the feeling that I'm riding one old, ugly bike, one with a bunch of stuff tacked onto it.
    It's got just two gears in the front; no suspension whatsoever; and center-pull brakes, which have
    never worked very well. Outfitted with my road-touring stuff, it weighs around 28 lbs. (13kg)

    Is it a pretty normal bike for road riding today, or am I riding the equivalent of one of those
    early 1900's bone-breakers?

    I'm not planning on getting rid of it. I'm just curious how it compares to others.

    -- Kirk

    "I f*cked Harry Potter."

    -- bumper stickers we all wished we'd see, but don't.
     
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  2. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "Kirk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > I got this bike for $40, at a garage sale, about 10 years ago. Anyone
    know
    > anything about this brand of bike? It was made in Czechoslovakia, if that helps.
    >
    > Even though I've owned the bike for a decade, I started riding it
    seriously
    > only a year or so ago. I guess this means I'm pretty new to riding.
    >
    > While I'm happy with the bike, I'm just wondering how it compares to others. I put on a new seat,
    > new handlebar tape, a couple of bags, new pedals with the toe-strap thingies, and some other
    > geegaws.
    >
    > I get the feeling that I'm riding one old, ugly bike, one with a bunch of stuff tacked onto it.
    > It's got just two gears in the front; no
    suspension
    > whatsoever; and center-pull brakes, which have never worked very well. Outfitted with my
    > road-touring stuff, it weighs around 28 lbs. (13kg)
    >
    > Is it a pretty normal bike for road riding today, or am I riding the equivalent of one of those
    > early 1900's bone-breakers?
    >
    > I'm not planning on getting rid of it. I'm just curious how it compares
    to
    > others.
    >
    >
    > -- Kirk
    >
    > "I f*cked Harry Potter."
    >
    > -- bumper stickers we all wished we'd see, but don't.

    Ahhhhh....the Favorit...or as we used to say, Not MY Favorit!!! Yeah, you're riding a
    communist-produced piece of junk. Sorry!! :) Seriously, they were OK bikes when they were new but
    we started to have serious supply problems for parts. Some parts were completely non-standard sizes
    and we simply couldn't get spares. I can't remember details, but it would be things like a handle
    bar stem that was, say, 26.2mm in diameter when the industry standard was 25.4. I doubt they're even
    produced anymore. We never sold them but some of the Eastern European immigrants here imported them
    and we ended up fixing them.

    From the ride standpoint, they are pretty modern. They used pretty much standard Italian-style
    geometry so they ride pretty normal. They generally had horrible paint and finishes. They used
    Eastern-bloc produced components, no Japanese or Western European stuff generally. Their kid's bikes
    were worse: coaster hubs with no available parts, 12 and 18" diameter tires with no replacements, a
    nightmare. I like to think of them as the Yugo of the bicycle industry.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  3. Kirk

    Kirk Guest

    "S. Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Ahhhhh....the Favorit...or as we used to say, Not MY Favorit!!! Yeah, you're riding a
    > communist-produced piece of junk. Sorry!! :)
    Seriously,
    > they were OK bikes when they were new but we started to have serious
    supply
    > problems for parts. Some parts were completely non-standard sizes and we simply couldn't get
    > spares. I can't remember details, but it would be things like a handle bar stem that was, say,
    > 26.2mm in diameter when the industry standard was 25.4. I doubt they're even produced anymore. We
    > never sold them but some of the Eastern European immigrants here imported them and we ended up
    > fixing them.
    >
    > From the ride standpoint, they are pretty modern. They used pretty much standard Italian-style
    > geometry so they ride pretty normal. They
    generally
    > had horrible paint and finishes. They used Eastern-bloc produced components, no Japanese or
    > Western European stuff generally. Their kid's bikes were worse: coaster hubs with no available
    > parts, 12 and 18"
    diameter
    > tires with no replacements, a nightmare. I like to think of them as the Yugo of the bicycle
    > industry.

    Hey, thanks for the info. For $40, it seems like a pretty good bike.

    -- Kirk
     
  4. In <[email protected]>, "Kirk" <[email protected]> opined:

    > Hey, thanks for the info. For $40, it seems like a pretty good bike.

    There are a whole lot of bikes you could have gotten for $40 that you wouldn't say were "pretty
    good", so that's all that really matters, right?

    --
    Dave Salovesh [email protected]
     
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