Favorite Pedal Wrench?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Splbound, Apr 22, 2003.

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  1. Splbound

    Splbound Guest

    I'm in the market for a good long pedal wrench. Anyone have a favorite? Park PW-4? Eldi?

    Thanks,

    -Ray
     
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  2. splbound <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I'm in the market for a good long pedal wrench. Anyone have a favorite? Park PW-4? Eldi?

    Using a Park in the local community workshop and an Eldi at home: both do the job, the Eldi IMHO is
    sufficient for home usage.

    --
    MfG/Best regards helmut springer
     
  3. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

  4. Andy-<< Eldi #61, at any real LBS.

    Concur-the Pedro's one is a good one for the home...

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  5. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On 22 Apr 2003 15:50:33 -0500, splbound <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm in the market for a good long pedal wrench. Anyone have a favorite? Park PW-4? Eldi?

    My favorite is a Craftsman 15mm open end, #44507. It fits every pair of pedals I own except for my
    Look PP247s. For these I have a LIFU 33A1, but don't think much of it. The offset handle makes it
    clumsy to use.

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  6. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    John Everett wrote:

    > My favorite is a Craftsman 15mm open end, #44507.

    The jaws of a standard 15mm open end wrench are not strong enough to remove a tight pedal. The
    jaws will just bend. If you've always been able to use such a wrench to remove pedals, you have
    been lucky.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  7. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    Pete Geurds wrote:

    > Terry Morse [email protected] wrote:
    > >The jaws of a standard 15mm open end wrench are not strong enough to remove a tight pedal. The
    > >jaws will just bend. If you've always been able to use such a wrench to remove pedals, you have
    > >been lucky.
    >
    > A cheap wrench might bend. I use a Craftsman wrench too. Hasn't failed yet. I've used a hammer to
    > "help" it too. If it does fail they'll give me a new one!

    Any standard open ended wrench will bend on a stuck pedal, cheap or expensive. Obviously, you have
    not had to remove a truly stuck pedal. Remember, the more you ride, the tighter you pedals get.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  8. Terry Morse wrote:

    >Any standard open ended wrench will bend on a stuck pedal, cheap or expensive. Obviously, you have
    >not had to remove a truly stuck pedal. Remember, the more you ride, the tighter you pedals get.
    >--
    >terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
    >
    >
    I didn't believe you , so I just tried. Those pedals are damned tight and after only 2000 miles.
    Here's my problem I have to box my bike up to take it overseas next weekend, how the hell do I get
    the pedals off? I'm a pretty strong bloke but they just don't budge. I tried the allen key and also
    with an open ended spanner with an extension bar, I now have one less allen key and one less spanner
    in my tool kit. Well actually 5 less allen keys it was one of those cheapy multi tool dealies which
    fell apart in my hand. Please help me. Oh I don't really want to carry a pedal wrench around Asia
    but I'll need to take them off when I come back again.

    --
    Cheers Damian Harvey

    This space reserved for standard disclaimer, witty quote, plug for own business in caps and large,
    bad ASCII art.
     
  9. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > Terry Morse wrote:
    > >Any standard open ended wrench will bend on a stuck pedal, cheap or expensive. Obviously, you
    > >have not had to remove a truly stuck pedal. Remember, the more you ride, the tighter you
    > >pedals get.

    "Damian Harvey" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I didn't believe you , so I just tried. Those pedals are damned tight and after only 2000 miles.
    > Here's my problem I have to box my bike up to take it overseas next weekend, how the hell do I get
    > the pedals off? I'm a pretty strong bloke but they just don't budge. I tried the allen key and
    > also with an open ended spanner with an extension bar, I now have one less allen key and one less
    > spanner in my tool kit. Well actually 5 less allen keys it was one of those cheapy multi tool
    > dealies which fell apart in my hand. Please help me. Oh I don't really want to carry a pedal
    > wrench around Asia but I'll need to take them off when I come back again.

    Consult a competent LBS. They can remove the pedals, clear the crud out of the threads and suggest a
    pedal wrench among their various lengths and brands.

    A pedal wrench is often part of a cyclist's vacation kit. It can sit in an airport locker while you
    are cycling if the weight bothers you.
    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>, "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > Terry Morse wrote:
    > > >Any standard open ended wrench will bend on a stuck pedal, cheap or expensive. Obviously, you
    > > >have not had to remove a truly stuck pedal. Remember, the more you ride, the tighter you
    > > >pedals get.
    >
    >
    > "Damian Harvey" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > I didn't believe you , so I just tried. Those pedals are damned tight and after only 2000 miles.
    > > Here's my problem I have to box my bike up to take it overseas next weekend, how the hell do I
    > > get the pedals off? I'm a pretty strong bloke but they just don't budge. I tried the allen key
    > > and also with an open ended spanner with an extension bar, I now have one less allen key and one
    > > less spanner in my tool kit. Well actually 5 less allen keys it was one of those cheapy multi
    > > tool dealies which fell apart in my hand. Please help me. Oh I don't really want to carry a
    > > pedal wrench around Asia but I'll need to take them off when I come back again.
    >
    > Consult a competent LBS. They can remove the pedals, clear the crud out of the threads and suggest
    > a pedal wrench among their various lengths and brands.
    >
    > A pedal wrench is often part of a cyclist's vacation kit. It can sit in an airport locker while
    > you are cycling if the weight bothers you.

    What differentiates a pedal wrench from an ordinary open-ended wrench? So far, all my pedals have
    been removable with the latter. The only trick I use is that I try to position the wrench so that I
    can squeeze the wrench and crankarm together when I am loosening or tightening the pedal.

    Looking at Park's site, the pedal wrench does look meatier. Am I going to spread my open-end wrench
    by taking off my pedals?

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  11. Sam Yorko

    Sam Yorko Guest

    A Muzi wrote:
    >
    > A pedal wrench is often part of a cyclist's vacation kit. It can sit in an airport locker while
    > you are cycling if the weight bothers you.

    Man, you haven't flown lately. All the airport lockers were closed after 9/11...

    Sam
     
  12. Scott

    Scott Guest

    splbound wrote:
    > I'm in the market for a good long pedal wrench. Anyone have a favorite? Park PW-4? Eldi?
    >

    I have a Park PW-3 that works fine. I ran into a problem when I got some Time ATAC carbon pedals. No
    wrench flats! Hex only.

    If I were buying today I'd get Pedros "Hex pedal wrench". It's basically a big hex wrench with a
    handle on it. All the bikes I interact with through a pedal tool take the same size hex. "Hex shank
    protrudes through handle helps quickly thread pedals into crank arms. Long length and comfortable
    handles tighten pedals securely." This link will get you close to a picture. Click on "pedal tools":
    http://www.pedros.com/frames/tools.html
     
  13. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > > > Terry Morse wrote:
    > > > >Any standard open ended wrench will bend on a stuck pedal, cheap or expensive. Obviously, you
    > > > >have not had to remove a truly stuck pedal. Remember, the more you ride, the tighter you
    > > > >pedals get.

    > > "Damian Harvey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > I didn't believe you , so I just tried. Those pedals are damned tight and after only 2000
    > > > miles. Here's my problem I have to box my bike up to take it overseas next weekend, how the
    > > > hell do I get the pedals off? I'm a pretty strong bloke but they just don't budge. I tried the
    > > > allen key and also with an open ended spanner with an extension bar, I now have one less allen
    > > > key and one less spanner in my tool kit. Well actually 5 less allen keys it was one of those
    > > > cheapy multi tool
    dealies
    > > > which fell apart in my hand. Please help me. Oh I don't really want to carry a pedal wrench
    > > > around Asia but I'll
    need
    > > > to take them off when I come back again.

    > In article <[email protected]>, "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Consult a competent LBS. They can remove the pedals, clear the crud out of the threads and
    suggest a
    > > pedal wrench among their various lengths and brands.
    > >
    > > A pedal wrench is often part of a cyclist's vacation kit. It can sit in
    an
    > > airport locker while you are cycling if the weight bothers you.

    "Ryan Cousineau" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What differentiates a pedal wrench from an ordinary open-ended wrench? So far, all my pedals have
    > been removable with the latter. The only trick I use is that I try to position the wrench so that
    > I can squeeze the wrench and crankarm together when I am loosening or tightening the pedal.
    >
    > Looking at Park's site, the pedal wrench does look meatier. Am I going to spread my open-end
    > wrench by taking off my pedals?

    Traditionally, pedals did not have more than four or five millimeters of wrench flat available.
    Hence the distinctive shape of a pedal wrench - long, thin and with more material than other
    wrenches around the head because of that length and thinness.

    Lately there's enough room for a full width normal combination wrench. We have used our long series
    (230mm) SnapOn 15mm wrenches with a pipe over the end occaisionally without harm to the wrench.

    We use the nicely designed Eldi #61 for almost all pedal loosening and tightening. But those don't
    take a pipe easily for the odd job which requires excessive leverage.

    Ryan makes a good point about technique in that the wrench should be parallel to the crank, or
    nearly so, for best results.
    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  14. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > A Muzi wrote:
    > > A pedal wrench is often part of a cyclist's vacation kit. It can sit in
    an
    > > airport locker while you are cycling if the weight bothers you.

    "Sam Yorko" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Man, you haven't flown lately. All the airport lockers were closed after 9/11...

    I haven't in many years. Sorry.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  15. Wayne Pein

    Wayne Pein Guest

    Ryan Cousineau wrote:

    > The only trick I use is that I try to position the wrench so that I can squeeze the wrench and
    > crankarm together when I am loosening or tightening the pedal.
    >

    I secure the crankarm to the chainstay with a toe strap.

    Wayne
     
  16. I have a Perk and LOVE it! there is very little play between the wrench and the flats on the pedal
    (less chance of "rounding") and the peened surface look sow kewl!

    Yoyu'll paw for it though ;-3)

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  17. Terry Morse <[email protected]> wrote:
    > The jaws of a standard 15mm open end wrench are not strong enough to remove a tight pedal. The
    > jaws will just bend. If you've always

    Not so for appropriate values of "standard", those tend to be too wide though for some
    pedals though.

    A locksmith's son,

    --
    MfG/Best regards helmut springer
     
  18. John McGraw

    John McGraw Guest

    scott <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > splbound wrote:
    > > I'm in the market for a good long pedal wrench. Anyone have a favorite? Park PW-4? Eldi?

    Gosh, I have never had a problem removing any pedal that I installed. Even after many years. I
    always use a good little dollop of anti-seize. Don't want to use too much, but definitely not too
    little. Although I have stripped the threads removing other peoples installations. I use anti-seize
    on free wheel & fixed cup threads, & grease on all other threads, unless I use Loctite on non-fully
    torqued threads, such as derailer pulley bolts, or cantilever brake bolts. I think I was very lucky,
    many years ago (say the '60, maybe earlier) when I was young, to have encountered stuck pedals &
    have learned how impossible they can be. Also when I have a seized thread, I soak it w/ penetrating
    oil, & rap it smartly w/ a small hammer, to try to aid the oil penetration w/ vibration. I really
    don't know if all this works, but it seems to. BTW I've always felt that grease or oil does not ruin
    the function of Loctite? It may not hold as well, but it seems to hold well enough. Does anyone know
    definitively if this is correct or not? Thanks John
     
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