Feet, Pins and Needles and Circus Bears

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by Porncone, May 19, 2009.

  1. Porncone

    Porncone New Member

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    This post has nothing to do with circus bears. I added them to the title as a cheap stunt to get views.

    I've searched the forums for tingling/pins and needles in the feet and have found only advice about 'hot foot'. That doesn't seem to match the symptoms I'm exhibiting so I thought I'd start a new thread. 5 weeks ago yesterday, I came down with a URI that was primarily focused in my head (congestion, runny nose, sneezing, etc.). I had just put in a decent week of training (730 TSS) so taking a few days off the bike was probably a good idea. After a few days, the virus moved into my chest and made camp there for the next 10 days or so. Eventually, a trip to the Doc in the Box and a prescription for zithromax finally cured me. Total of 3 weeks sick with 1+ weeks off the bike.

    When the cold set in, I began feeling a mild pins and needles sensation in both feet all the time. I could stand, walk and ride without grimacing, but the sensation was always there. It was present when I woke up and still there when I went to bed. It did/does seem like the sensation is less noticable following a ride, which I guess is a good thing. On several occassions, I have ridden specifically to quiet the tingling.

    Mechanically, I upgraded my pedals from old delta Look pedals to Keo Carbons about a week prior to getting sick. I put roughly 60 miles on the new pedals before getting sick and staying off the bike. I don't recall feeling anything during that week to indicate it was the pedals, and I don't think there's much of a difference between the old and new Look pedals (though if the stack height was so significantly different as to require a saddle height adjustment, that might explain a whole lot). I also bought a new pair of Bontrager RXL shoes, but only wore them twice (they're white and it's been raining a lot). I upgraded my saddle about 5 months ago and have had zero problems with it. Everything else is the same as it has been since I was fitted last April.

    I've sought medical advice from the same doctor that gave me the antibiotics for the URI. He listened my history, nodded in agreement, shared a few cycling stories and ordered a 'random blood glucose' test to check for diabetes. Diabetic neuropathy is one of many explanations for chronic pins and needles in the feet. The result was 101 about 2 hours after drinking a Starbucks grande caffe mocha. My feeling (and that of the members of diabetesforums.com) is that a 101 is well within normal limits and I do not have diabetes. However, this doctor feels I am diabetic with no other evidience to suggest that diagnosis is accurate. I am going through with a workup so I can rule diabetes out as a possible cause, but I'm fairly sure the results will be negative and I'll be back to looking for the root cause.

    Has anyone else experienced anything like this? Is there a cycling-related cause? I don't think the symptoms began with the new pedals, but I haven't ruled anything out yet and am willing to try whatever to fix it. I went back to my old shoes and have been making sure they're not too tight. The old and new pedals are very similar and the only real difference I noted was that the Keos appear a bit shorter. My cleats are in the same position, which is nearly all the way back (towards the heel).

    Any advice is greatly appreciated.
     
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  2. kazz330

    kazz330 New Member

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    it sounds like your saddle is cutting off circulation to your feet/legs.

    I would try a different saddle.
     
  3. dnote627

    dnote627 New Member

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    My holistic physician said that the stinging, itching, twitching or burning in muscles could be from a potassium deficiency. I use a liquid mineral supplement to over come this.
     
  4. graywulf

    graywulf New Member

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    Yes, Kazz is right. Pins and needles is most commonly a result of poor circulation. It could mean a clot, diabetes, ..... but I don't think it is. I would try adjusting your cleats as well, maybe lower the seatpost, raise it, etc - new shoes may throw off that measurement.
     
  5. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    I've never had a problem with changing equipment, frames, shoes or even switching between different bike types (time trial with 82degree seat angle and mountain bikes with 72 within hours). In general you don't get major events like yours from equipment change - sore knees maybe, pins and needles through circulatory or nerve problems... no.

    I don't think your problem is with the zithromax because it's known side effects don't include pins and needles.

    You didn't do anything that may have trapped a nerve or slightly tweek your back? As you're getting the symptoms off the bike I'd put my money on it not being bike related - but I've been wrong before... but it's not an impossible feat to pop a vertibrae out of place if you're bent forwards during an extreme coughing fit. I've been there and done that one.

    In addition to a real check for diabetes, I'd get the doc to order a full blood panel and take it from there. You could be a little pro-active during your time off the bike and put your old pedals back on and use your old shoes.

    Sure it's a pisser not to use the new stuff but something has happened and the parts that you can control are essentially free - put everything back the way they were just to rule them out. WHEN you're fully over the cold/flu get back on the bike and see what happens before and after the rides.
     
  6. Feltski

    Feltski New Member

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    I recently read a medical journal that stated that if you are diagnosed with diabetes today, you could have already had the disease for as long as 7 years. Not saying you have it, but prolonged tingling in the feet is a common symptom of diabetic neuropathy. The fact that your BG was 101mg/dl says that it is certainly within normal range at the time of the test, however BG fluctuates significantly during the day as you eat. It may be worth purchasing a glucometer and take tests throughout the day, starting as soon as you wake up (after a nights fast), right after a meal, and then one and two hours after the meal. Within 2 hours, you should be back into the 80-110ish mg/dl range. Im sure your doc will do a HbA1c test, which is a good long term indicator of BG. Hope this helps. Keep us posted
     
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