Femur length and cycling better?????

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Andrew Albright, Apr 17, 2003.

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  1. I have heard or read that a longer femur to lower leg ratio results in better cycling, i.e. some
    dude with a longer femur would be a better cyclist.

    Is this folklore or is there a peer-review scientific reference for it? Someone asked me and I could
    not recall if someone had actually done this type of study, or did it fall into the folklore
    category (like a lot of what is done and said in cycling).
     
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  2. Jay Hill

    Jay Hill Guest

    Andrew Albright wrote:
    > I have heard or read that a longer femur to lower leg ratio results in better cycling, i.e. some
    > dude with a longer femur would be a better cyclist.

    I've read this about Greg Lemond, but not in a serious study. I've also read that that is
    responsible for the geometry of the bikes that carry his name.

    If nothing else, you'd get more quads with a longer femur, wouldn't you?

    > Is this folklore or is there a peer-review scientific reference for it? Someone asked me and I
    > could not recall if someone had actually done this type of study, or did it fall into the folklore
    > category (like a lot of what is done and said in cycling).
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >Andrew Albright wrote:
    >> I have heard or read that a longer femur to lower leg ratio results in better cycling, i.e. some
    >> dude with a longer femur would be a better cyclist.
    >
    >I've read this about Greg Lemond, but not in a serious study. I've also read that that is
    >responsible for the geometry of the bikes that carry his name.

    Big Mig is also supposed to have a longer femur.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  4. "Jay Hill" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Andrew Albright wrote:
    > > I have heard or read that a longer femur to lower leg ratio results in better cycling, i.e. some
    > > dude with a longer femur would be a better cyclist.
    >
    > I've read this about Greg Lemond, but not in a serious study. I've also read that that is
    > responsible for the geometry of the bikes that carry his name.
    >
    > If nothing else, you'd get more quads with a longer femur, wouldn't you?

    It would be more of a leverage issue.

    There are computer programs which model biomechanics. Paleontologists have been using them to
    determine what different species of dinosaurs were capable of based upon the skeletal data.

    I'll guess it would be much easier to run one of those programs on a human cyclist because they
    wouldn't have to infer muscular data.

    As an aside, I've also read that Indurain had an ideal femur to inseam ratio, but people may just be
    saying that without actually knowing if it was the case because he was so abnormally gifted.
     
  5. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    "Kurgan Gringioni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Jay Hill" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Andrew Albright wrote:
    > > > I have heard or read that a longer femur to lower leg ratio
    results in
    > > > better cycling, i.e. some dude with a longer femur would be a
    better
    > > > cyclist.
    > >
    > > I've read this about Greg Lemond, but not in a serious study.
    I've
    > > also read that that is responsible for the geometry of the bikes
    that
    > > carry his name.
    > >
    > > If nothing else, you'd get more quads with a longer femur,
    wouldn't you?
    >
    > It would be more of a leverage issue.

    The problem here is that most big time racers don't have physical abnormalities. Eddy Merckx was
    close to dead normal. Axel had a long femur length I think I read. Armstong is in the normal
    range as well.

    You can tell that LeMond had a weird shape because the bike of his they tested in one of the
    magazines had measurements of 52 c-c 59!!!

    > As an aside, I've also read that Indurain had an ideal femur to
    inseam
    > ratio, but people may just be saying that without actually knowing
    if it was
    > the case because he was so abnormally gifted.

    I guess it takes an abnormal to recognize an abnormal.
     
  6. Alex Rodriguez <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > >
    > >
    > >Andrew Albright wrote:
    > >> I have heard or read that a longer femur to lower leg ratio results in better cycling, i.e.
    > >> some dude with a longer femur would be a better cyclist.
    > >
    > >I've read this about Greg Lemond, but not in a serious study. I've also read that that is
    > >responsible for the geometry of the bikes that carry his name.

    Bernard Hinault's book: Road Racing and cycling technique talks about this as well. Hinault also had
    a higher ratio as well. I think it does give a rider bigger advantage, but I don't think it explains
    everything such as training and or technique.
    >
    > Big Mig is also supposed to have a longer femur.
    > -----------------
    > Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  7. That's interesting and makes some sense to me because I know a serious racer where I live that has
    long femurs and he is a powerful rider. He is slightly taller then me but I sense his legs have more
    power because of that. He is great on the flats but I can best him on climbs when I am in the zone
    with my climbing fitness. It seems climbing doesn't suit him that well even though he lives in the
    hills because he usually opts out of long hard climbs. He is thin with very little fat, but not a
    flyweight.

    B-
    --------------------------
    "Andrew Albright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have heard or read that a longer femur to lower leg ratio results in better cycling, i.e. some
    > dude with a longer femur would be a better cyclist.
    >
    > Is this folklore or is there a peer-review scientific reference for it? Someone asked me and I
    > could not recall if someone had actually done this type of study, or did it fall into the folklore
    > category (like a lot of what is done and said in cycling).
     
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