Ferrari didn't say EPO was as safe as orange juice

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Jim Flom, Jul 24, 2004.

  1. Jim Flom

    Jim Flom Guest

    Ferrari has to be careful about what he says about synthetic EPO.

    He has been saddled for several years with what he says is an inaccurate
    quote that equated EPO's safety with that of orange juice.

    His intent, he writes, was to say that EPO and orange juice can be used
    safely, but both can be dangerous if abused.

    "EPO is illegal. And that is all about it," he writes in the email. "I'm
    totally against administration of any kind of medicines with the intent of
    artificially enhancing performance. Every athlete has rights to take
    medicines for therapeutic reasons or to limit the lesions caused by intense
    sport practice, obviously in every respect to laws and regulations.

    "I am convinced that it is possible to be competitive by developing and
    utilizing the most proper training strategies. The majority of doping
    medicines used in sport are not only dangerous for health; they definitely
    do not improve performances, if not even worsening them."

    Ferrari also writes that he has learned much from his experience with the
    judicial system and sees that the courts are not necessarily the best way to
    deal with the performance-enhancing drugs.

    " I personally think that prohibition alone does not resolve the doping
    problem," he writes. "It is necessary to make athletes understand, with the
    help of credible arguments, that doping is not essential, that often it can
    worsen performances and that it is possible to reach results through
    perfection of nutritional and training strategies and proper lifestyle."

    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/cycling/2004-07-13-armstrong-ferrari_x.htm?csp=1
     
    Tags:


  2. Chris

    Chris Guest

    "Jim Flom" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Ferrari has to be careful about what he says about synthetic EPO.
    >
    > He has been saddled for several years with what he says is an inaccurate
    > quote that equated EPO's safety with that of orange juice.


    He stated that there are many substances that can harm a person if the
    quantity is too much, including orange juice (there was a pitcher of orange
    juice at the interview). One of the journalists that heard the statement
    wrote an article with a headline that he stated EPO was no ore dangerous
    than orange juice.


    >
    > His intent, he writes, was to say that EPO and orange juice can be used
    > safely, but both can be dangerous if abused.
    >
    > "EPO is illegal. And that is all about it," he writes in the email. "I'm
    > totally against administration of any kind of medicines with the intent of
    > artificially enhancing performance. Every athlete has rights to take
    > medicines for therapeutic reasons or to limit the lesions caused by

    intense
    > sport practice, obviously in every respect to laws and regulations.
    >
    > "I am convinced that it is possible to be competitive by developing and
    > utilizing the most proper training strategies. The majority of doping
    > medicines used in sport are not only dangerous for health; they definitely
    > do not improve performances, if not even worsening them."
    >
    > Ferrari also writes that he has learned much from his experience with the
    > judicial system and sees that the courts are not necessarily the best way

    to
    > deal with the performance-enhancing drugs.
    >
    > " I personally think that prohibition alone does not resolve the doping
    > problem," he writes. "It is necessary to make athletes understand, with

    the
    > help of credible arguments, that doping is not essential, that often it

    can
    > worsen performances and that it is possible to reach results through
    > perfection of nutritional and training strategies and proper lifestyle."
    >
    >

    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/cycling/2004-07-13-armstrong-ferrari_x.htm?cs
    p=1
    >
    >
     
  3. Jim Flom

    Jim Flom Guest

    "Chris" wrote...
    >
    > He stated that there are many substances that can harm a person if the
    > quantity is too much, including orange juice (there was a pitcher of

    orange
    > juice at the interview). One of the journalists that heard the statement
    > wrote an article with a headline that he stated EPO was no ore dangerous
    > than orange juice.


    That misquote has been promulgated here too, recently. Maybe Ferrari should
    sue the culprit for libel.
     
  4. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    "Jim Flom" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Chris" wrote...
    > >
    > > He stated that there are many substances that can harm a person if the
    > > quantity is too much, including orange juice (there was a pitcher of

    > orange
    > > juice at the interview). One of the journalists that heard the statement
    > > wrote an article with a headline that he stated EPO was no ore dangerous
    > > than orange juice.

    >
    > That misquote has been promulgated here too, recently. Maybe Ferrari

    should
    > sue the culprit for libel.


    Dr. Ferrari stated "EPO is not dangerous, it's the abuse that is. It's also
    dangerous to
    drink 10 liters of orange juice."

    Thus, EPO is no more dangerous than orange juice if not abused as it is "not
    dangerous" if not abused. The only issue here is for Ferrari to define EPO
    abuse.

    Ferrari also said, "I don't prescribe this stuff. But one can buy EPO in
    Switzerland for example without a prescription, and if a riders does, that
    doesn't scandalize me. EPO doesn't fundamentally change the performance of a
    racer."

    Perhaps he doesn't prescribe "the stuff," but Simeoni has testified under
    oath that Ferrari does "recommend" the stuff. (prescribing "the stuff" for a
    non-medical purpose could get a doctor in trouble with his/her licensing
    authority) Interesting, too that a rider using EPO doesn't scandalize him as
    he says it "doesn't fundamentally change the performance of a racer."
    Really?! Some people thought that someone with a hemnatocrit of 55+ would
    ride better than someone not using EPO and having a hematocrit in the low to
    mid-40s. Perhaps Jeff could ask Ferrari to expound upon this in a future
    article at CyclingNews.
     
  5. B. Lafferty wrote:

    > "Jim Flom" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>"Chris" wrote...
    >>
    >>>He stated that there are many substances that can harm a person if the
    >>>quantity is too much, including orange juice (there was a pitcher of

    >>
    >>orange
    >>
    >>>juice at the interview). One of the journalists that heard the statement
    >>>wrote an article with a headline that he stated EPO was no ore dangerous
    >>>than orange juice.

    >>
    >>That misquote has been promulgated here too, recently. Maybe Ferrari

    >
    > should
    >
    >>sue the culprit for libel.

    >
    >
    > Dr. Ferrari stated "EPO is not dangerous, it's the abuse that is. It's also
    > dangerous to
    > drink 10 liters of orange juice."
    >
    > Thus, EPO is no more dangerous than orange juice if not abused as it is "not
    > dangerous" if not abused. The only issue here is for Ferrari to define EPO
    > abuse.
    >
    > Ferrari also said, "I don't prescribe this stuff. But one can buy EPO in
    > Switzerland for example without a prescription, and if a riders does, that
    > doesn't scandalize me. EPO doesn't fundamentally change the performance of a
    > racer."
    >
    > Perhaps he doesn't prescribe "the stuff," but Simeoni has testified under
    > oath that Ferrari does "recommend" the stuff. (prescribing "the stuff" for a
    > non-medical purpose could get a doctor in trouble with his/her licensing
    > authority) Interesting, too that a rider using EPO doesn't scandalize him as
    > he says it "doesn't fundamentally change the performance of a racer."
    > Really?! Some people thought that someone with a hemnatocrit of 55+ would
    > ride better than someone not using EPO and having a hematocrit in the low to
    > mid-40s. Perhaps Jeff could ask Ferrari to expound upon this in a future
    > article at CyclingNews.


    I've found my doctors, over the years, could be pretty candid about
    things. I had a kidney infection once and was put on medication, I
    asked the doctor if he had any particular recommendation on what to
    drink, since I needed to consume a lot of liquid. He recommended beer,
    as long as I was going to be sick, I might as well enjoy myself. Same
    doctor, when I asked what I could do about my low blood pressure and
    frequent dizzy spells (and occasional blackouts) recommended more salt,
    go get a bag of potato chips.

    If my doctor were knowing that his advice might appear in a newspaper
    article, he'd probably be a bit less glib.
     
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